Tag Archive: kathryn bigelow


blogs.indiewire.com reported that over the weekend, Hollywood’s A-list have been flying into London, to be greeted by the traditional British February welcome of rain-that-sometimes-turns-into-snow, in order to brave tonight’s British Academy of Film and Television Awards (or BAFTA Awards), the U.K. equivalent to the Oscars.

Here is a full list of the nominees and winners (winners in bold, updating live):

BEST FILM
ARGO Grant Heslov, Ben Affleck, George Clooney
LES MISÉRABLES Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Debra Hayward, Cameron Mackintosh
LIFE OF PI Gil Netter, Ang Lee, David Womark
LINCOLN Steven Spielberg, Kathleen Kennedy
ZERO DARK THIRTY Mark Boal, Kathryn Bigelow, Megan Ellison

OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM
ANNA KARENINA Joe Wright, Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Paul Webster, Tom Stoppard
THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL John Madden, Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin, Ol Parker
LES MISÉRABLES Tom Hooper, Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Debra Hayward, Cameron Mackintosh, William Nicholson, Alain Boublil, Claude-Michel Schönberg, Herbert Kretzmer
SEVEN PSYCHOPATHS Martin McDonagh, Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin
SKYFALL Sam Mendes, Michael G. Wilson, Barbara Broccoli, Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, John Logan

OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER
BART LAYTON (Director), DIMITRI DOGANIS (Producer) The Imposter
DAVID MORRIS (Director), JACQUI MORRIS (Director/Producer) McCullin
DEXTER FLETCHER (Director/Writer), DANNY KING (Writer) Wild Bill
JAMES BOBIN (Director) The Muppets
TINA GHARAVI (Director/Writer) I Am Nasrine

FILM NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
AMOUR Michael Haneke, Margaret Ménégoz
HEADHUNTERS Morten Tyldum, Marianne Gray, Asle Vatn
THE HUNT Thomas Vinterberg, Sisse Graum Jørgensen, Morten Kaufmann
RUST AND BONE Jacques Audiard, Pascal Caucheteux
UNTOUCHABLE Eric Toledano, Olivier Nakache, Nicolas Duval Adassovsky, Yann Zenou, Laurent Zeitoun

DOCUMENTARY
THE IMPOSTER Bart Layton, Dimitri Doganis
MARLEY Kevin Macdonald, Steve Bing, Charles Steel
McCULLIN David Morris, Jacqui Morris
SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN Malik Bendjelloul, Simon Chinn
WEST OF MEMPHIS Amy Berg

ANIMATED FILM
BRAVE Mark Andrews, Brenda Chapman
FRANKENWEENIE Tim Burton
PARANORMAN Sam Fell, Chris Butler

DIRECTOR
AMOUR Michael Haneke
ARGO Ben Affleck
DJANGO UNCHAINED Quentin Tarantino
LIFE OF PI Ang Lee
ZERO DARK THIRTY Kathryn Bigelow

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
AMOUR Michael Haneke
DJANGO UNCHAINED Quentin Tarantino
THE MASTER Paul Thomas Anderson
MOONRISE KINGDOM Wes Anderson, Roman Coppola
ZERO DARK THIRTY Mark Boal

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
ARGO Chris Terrio
BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD Lucy Alibar, Benh Zeitlin
LIFE OF PI David Magee
LINCOLN Tony Kushner
SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK David O. Russell

LEADING ACTOR
BEN AFFLECK Argo
BRADLEY COOPER Silver Linings Playbook
DANIEL DAY-LEWIS Lincoln
HUGH JACKMAN Les Misérables
JOAQUIN PHOENIX The Master

LEADING ACTRESS
EMMANUELLE RIVA Amour
HELEN MIRREN Hitchcock
JENNIFER LAWRENCE Silver Linings Playbook
JESSICA CHASTAIN Zero Dark Thirty
MARION COTILLARD Rust and Bone

SUPPORTING ACTOR
ALAN ARKIN Argo
CHRISTOPH WALTZ Django Unchained
JAVIER BARDEM Skyfall
PHILIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN The Master
TOMMY LEE JONES Lincoln

SUPPORTING ACTRESS
AMY ADAMS The Master
ANNE HATHAWAY Les Misérables
HELEN HUNT The Sessions
JUDI DENCH Skyfall
SALLY FIELD Lincoln

ORIGINAL MUSIC
ANNA KARENINA Dario Marianelli
ARGO Alexandre Desplat
LIFE OF PI Mychael Danna
LINCOLN John Williams
SKYFALL Thomas Newman

CINEMATOGRAPHY
ANNA KARENINA Seamus McGarvey
LES MISÉRABLES Danny Cohen
LIFE OF PI Claudio Miranda
LINCOLN Janusz Kaminski
SKYFALL Roger Deakins

EDITING
ARGO William Goldenberg
DJANGO UNCHAINED Fred Raskin
LIFE OF PI Tim Squyres
SKYFALL Stuart Baird
ZERO DARK THIRTY Dylan Tichenor, William Goldenberg

PRODUCTION DESIGN
ANNA KARENINA Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer
LES MISÉRABLES Eve Stewart, Anna Lynch-Robinson
LIFE OF PI David Gropman, Anna Pinnock
LINCOLN Rick Carter, Jim Erickson
SKYFALL Dennis Gassner, Anna Pinnock

COSTUME DESIGN
ANNA KARENINA Jacqueline Durran
GREAT EXPECTATIONS Beatrix Aruna Pasztor
LES MISÉRABLES Paco Delgado
LINCOLN Joanna Johnston
SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN Colleen Atwood

MAKE UP & HAIR
ANNA KARENINA Ivana Primorac
HITCHCOCK Julie Hewett, Martin Samuel, Howard Berger
THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY Peter Swords King, Richard Taylor, Rick Findlater
LES MISÉRABLES Lisa Westcott
LINCOLN Lois Burwell, Kay Georgiou

SOUND
DJANGO UNCHAINED Mark Ulano, Michael Minkler, Tony Lamberti, Wylie Stateman
THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY Tony Johnson, Christopher Boyes, Michael Hedges, Michael Semanick, Brent Burge, Chris Ward
LES MISÉRABLES Simon Hayes, Andy Nelson, Mark Paterson, Jonathan Allen, Lee Walpole, John Warhurst
LIFE OF PI Drew Kunin, Eugene Gearty, Philip Stockton, Ron Bartlett, D. M. Hemphill
SKYFALL Stuart Wilson, Scott Millan, Greg P. Russell, Per Hallberg, Karen Baker Landers

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS
THE DARK KNIGHT RISES Paul Franklin, Chris Corbould, Peter Bebb, Andrew Lockley
THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY Joe Letteri, Eric Saindon, David Clayton, R. Christopher White
LIFE OF PI Bill Westenhofer, Guillaume Rocheron, Erik-Jan De Boer
MARVEL AVENGERS ASSEMBLE Nominees TBC
PROMETHEUS Richard Stammers, Charley Henley, Trevor Wood, Paul Butterworth

SHORT ANIMATION
HERE TO FALL Kris Kelly, Evelyn McGrath
I’M FINE THANKS Eamonn O’Neill
THE MAKING OF LONGBIRD Will Anderson, Ainslie Henderson

SHORT FILM
THE CURSE Fyzal Boulifa, Gavin Humphries
GOOD NIGHT Muriel d’Ansembourg, Eva Sigurdardottir
SWIMMER Lynne Ramsay, Peter Carlton, Diarmid Scrimshaw
TUMULT Johnny Barrington, Rhianna Andrews
THE VOORMAN PROBLEM Mark Gill, Baldwin Li

THE EE RISING STAR AWARD (voted for by the public)
ELIZABETH OLSEN
ANDREA RISEBOROUGH
SURAJ SHARMA
JUNO TEMPLE
ALICIA VIKANDER

source: hollywoodreporter.com image from blogs.indiewire.com

_Bafta_2446156c

Tomorrow night’s BAFTA Awards are the last televised stop on the awards calendar before the Oscars, and in a year where several key races remain unsettled, they’ll be watched even more eagerly than usual by awards pundits. (Well, “followed” if not “watched” — I, for one, won’t have access to the live broadcast of the show, annually shown on a quaint tape-delay system that suggests the BBC hasn’t quite got to grips yet with a little thing called the internet. But I digress.)

Like the Academy, the BAFTA voters lavished attention on an apparent frontrunner, only to undermine it by eliminating it from the Best Director race. The difference, of course, is that the British and American groups dealt this backhand to different films. Where the Oscars left Ben Affleck (as a director, at least) out of the party, the Brits decided Steven Spieberg could afford to sit this one out, despite handing “Lincoln” a field-leading 10 nominations. This truly is the season of mixed signals, as Guy Lod wrote for hitfix.com

In any event, BAFTA embraced “Argo” wholeheartedly, shocking onlookers by adding a Best Actor nod for Ben Affleck (his first and only individual acting mention of the season.) Though “Life of Pi” — a genuine box office story in the UK — seemed to be surging around the time of the nominations, I’ve a feeling BAFTA will follow the lead of the Globes and the Guilds by crowning Affleck’s tidy Hollywood thriller. Still, if Ang Lee manages to sneak past Ben Affleck tomorrow night to win his third Best Director BAFTA, this very unusual race could get even harder to read. With nine nominations and impressive local box office, “Life of Pi” feels due more than just a technical award or two, and could even be a spoiler in the Best Film race too.

Read more at http://bit.ly/WCe5Dp

The awards will be announced on Sunday 10 February at a ceremony hosted by Stephen Fry at the Royal Opera House, London.

Best Film

Argo – Grant Heslov, Ben Affleck, George Clooney
Les Misérables – Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Debra Hayward, Cameron Mackintosh
Life of Pi – Gil Netter, Ang Lee, David Womark
Lincoln – Steven Spielberg, Kathleen Kennedy
Zero Dark Thirty – Mark Boal, Kathryn Bigelow, Megan Ellison

Outstanding British Film

Anna Karenina – Joe Wright, Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Paul Webster, Tom Stoppard
The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel – John Madden, Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin, Ol Parker
Les Misérables – Tom Hooper, Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Debra Hayward, Cameron Mackintosh, William Nicholson, Alain Boublil, Claude-Michel Schönberg, Herbert Kretzmer
Seven Psychopaths – Martin McDonagh, Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin
Skyfall – Sam Mendes, Michael G. Wilson, Barbara Broccoli, Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, John Logan

Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer

Bart Layt (Director), Dimitri Doganis (Producer) – The Imposter
David Morris (Director), Jacqui Morris (Director/Producer) – McCullin Dexter Fletcher (Director/Writer), Danny King (Writer) – Wild Bill
James Bobin (Director) – The Muppets
Tina Gharavi (Director/Writer) – I Am Nasrine

Film Not in the English Language

Amour – Michael Haneke, Margaret Ménégoz
Headhunters – Morten Tyldum, Marianne Gray, Asle Vatn
The Hunt – Thomas Vinterberg, Sisse Graum Jørgensen, Morten Kaufmann
Rust and Bone – Jacques Audiard, Pascal Caucheteux
Untouchable – Eric Toledano, Olivier Nakache, Nicolas Duval Adassovsky, Yann Zenou, Laurent Zeitoun

Documentary

The Imposter – Bart Layton, Dimitri Doganis
Marley – Kevin Macdonald, Steve Bing, Charles Steel
McCullin – David Morris, Jacqui Morris
Searching for Sugar Man – Malik Bendjelloul, Simon Chinn
West of Memphis – Amy Berg

Animated Film

Brave – Mark Andrews, Brenda Chapman
Frankenweenie – Tim Burton
Paranorman – Sam Fell, Chris Butler

Director

Amour – Michael Haneke
Argo – Ben Affleck
Django Unchained – Quentin Tarantino
Life of Pi – Ang Lee
Zero Dark Thirty – Kathryn Bigelow

Original Screenplay

Amour – Michael Haneke
Django Unchained – Quentin Tarantino
The Master – Paul Thomas Anderson
Moonrise Kingdom – Wes Anderson, Roman Coppola
Zero Dark Thirty – Mark Boal

Adapted Screenplay

Argo – Chris Terrio
Beasts of the Southern Wild – Lucy Alibar, Benh Zeitlin
Life of Pi – David Magee
Lincoln – Tony Kushner
Silver Linings Playbook – David O. Russell

Leading Actor

Ben Affleck – Argo
Bradley Cooper – Silver Linings Playbook
Daniel Day-Lewis – Lincoln
Hugh Jackman – Les Misérables
Joaquin Phoenix –The Master

Leading Actress

Emmanuelle Riva – Amour
Helen Mirren – Hitchcock
Jennifer Lawrence – Silver Linings Playbook
Jessica Chastain – Zero Dark Thirty
Marion Cotillard – Rust and Bone

Supporting Actor

Alan Arkin – Argo
Christoph Waltz – Django Unchained
Javier Bardem – Skyfall
Philip Seymour Hoffman – The Master
Tommy Lee Jones – Lincoln

Supporting Actress

Amy Adams – The Master
Anne Hathaway – Les Misérables
Helen Hunt – The Sessions
Judi Dench – Skyfall
Sally Field – Lincoln

Original Music

Anna Karenina – Dario Marianelli
Argo – Alexandre Desplat
Life of Pi – Mychael Danna
Lincoln – John Williams
Skyfall – Thomas Newman

Cinematography

Anna Karenina – Seamus McGarvey
Les Misérables – Danny Cohen
Life of Pi – Claudio Miranda
Lincoln – Janusz Kaminski
Skyfall  – Roger Deakins

Editing

Argo – William Goldenberg
Django Unchained – Fred Raskin
Life of Pi – Tim Squyres
Skyfall – Stuart Baird
Zero Dark Thirty – Dylan Tichenor, William Goldenberg

Production Design

Anna Karenina – Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer
Les Misérables – Eve Stewart, Anna Lynch-Robinson
Life of Pi – David Gropman, Anna Pinnock
Lincoln – Rick Carter, Jim Erickson
Skyfall – Dennis Gassner, Anna Pinnock

Costume Design

Anna Karenina – Jacqueline Durran
Great Expectations – Beatrix Aruna Pasztor
Les Misérables – Paco Delgado
Lincoln – Joanna Johnston
Snow White and the Huntsman – Colleen Atwood

Make-up and Hair

Anna Karenina – Ivana Primorac
Hitchcock – Julie Hewett, Martin Samuel, Howard Berger
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey – Peter Swords King, Richard Taylor, Rick Findlater
Les Misérables – Lisa Westcott
Lincoln – Lois Burwell, Kay Georgiou

Sound

Django Unchained – Mark Ulano, Michael Minkler, Tony Lamberti, Wylie Stateman
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey – Tony Johnson, Christopher Boyes, Michael Hedges, Michael Semanick, Brent Burge, Chris Ward
Les Misérables – Simon Hayes, Andy Nelson, Mark Paterson, Jonathan Allen, Lee Walpole, John Warhurst
Life of Pi – Drew Kunin, Eugene Gearty, Philip Stockton, Ron Bartlett, D. M. Hemphill
Skyfall – Stuart Wilson, Scott Millan, Greg P. Russell, Per Hallberg, Karen Baker Landers

Special Visual Effects

The Dark Knight Rises – Paul Franklin, Chris Corbould, Peter Bebb, Andrew Lockley
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey – Joe Letteri, Eric Saindon, David Clayton, R. Christopher White
Life of Pi – Bill Westenhofer, Guillaume Rocheron, Erik-Jan De Boer
Marvel Avengers Assemble – Nominees TBC
Prometheus – Richard Stammers, Charley Henley, Trevor Wood, Paul Butterworth

Short Animation

Here to Fall – Kris Kelly, Evelyn McGrath
I’m Fine Thanks – Eamonn O’Neill
The Making of Longbird – Will Anderson, Ainslie Henderson

Short Film

The Curse – Fyzal Boulifa, Gavin Humphries
Good Night – Muriel d’Ansembourg, Eva Sigurdardottir
Swimmer – Lynne Ramsay, Peter Carlton, Diarmid Scrimshaw
Tumult – Johnny Barrington, Rhianna Andrews
The Voorman Problem – Mark Gill, Baldwin Li

The EE Rising Star Award (voted for by the public)

Elizabeth Olsen
Andrea Riseborough
Suraj Sharma
Juno Temple
Alicia Vikander

–taken from bfi.org.uk

Zero Dark Thirty Review

Zero Dark Thirty (or ‘Everything You Wanted to Know About Torture, But Were Too Afraid To Ask’) is the latest by Academy Award winning director, Kathryn Bigelow who has returned to the big screen with her follow up to The Hurt Locker. It has been a note of contention for the past few years whether Bigelow won the award for her war thriller because she was is a woman (note Bret Easton Ellis on Twitter), because The Hurt Locker was nominated the same year as her ex-husband’s Avatar, because it was a contemporary war film or (and the most simple answer being) she is a good filmmaker, who (surprisingly) makes good films. As an audience member or critic, very few of us want to admit the last option is a viable one – it’s much more fun to beat the winners down or come up with other reasons why they were chosen, but I can honestly admit, hand on heart that after watching Zero Dark Thirty, all my suspicions were confirmed – I am ready to admit it *takes deep breath* – Kathryn Bigelow is a damn good filmmaker.

Right, now that I have gotten that out of the way, how about we get onto brass taxZero Dark Thirty is based upon one of the most followed stories of the past two decades; in reality it has affected thousands, if not millions around the globe and is one of the greatest victories in recent American history. I am talking about the tracking down, capturing and killing of terrorist, Osama Bin Laden, the man who was responsible for changing American history and so many lives in September 2011.

Mark Boal’s script, along with the work of Bigelow, is telling the story of greatest manhunt in history in a fictionalised telling of the operation, which lead to Bin Laden.

 

Taking a moment to look at Zero Dark Thirty as a whole piece of work – the film seems to have arrived at a point where we openly have a dialogue surrounding terrorism and it’s downfall. As an audience we are happy to admit the good guys can win in the story, and it no longer looks fake because ultimately it happened in reality. What I did take away from this film, and continue to ponder over is the feeling of an extended (and with much more money) episode of Homeland. This of course is not a negative, it has fast become of the most popular shows on both sides of the Atlantic, winning awards galore both for the show and it’s talent. But at the same time, I was finding it a little difficult to get Maya away from Carrie (Claire Danes’ bi-polar obsessed character) because both women become dangerously obsessed with finding the ‘baddie’. But whilst Homeland serialises the issues, and cuts them up into nice little chunks for the audience to digest each week, waiting on the end of their seat for the next episode, Zero Dark Thirty pounds them home, punch by punch, scene by scene. Maya becomes locked in a battle with everyone around her because she knows that she is moving in the right direction.

Zero Dark Thirty also observes a very interesting movement we are currently having with powerful women. I am pretty sure that not even ten years ago, we would have a terrorist thriller, which finds itself relying upon a woman to do the work. Instead, traditionally, women were seducers, traitors, lovers, wives and sometimes the (stay in the office) boss but not in recent memory (Homeland aside) is a tough woman, not sexualised but instead running against all the odds in a foreign part of the world to get the work done. This is where Jessica Chastain comes in; she is beautiful and there is no denying that but her performance as Maya blows every tough man performance out of the water. She is a no bullshitting bitch, who intends to find her goal and when she gets there, that will be the end but not before then. She is thrilling, and powerful.

Read more here http://bit.ly/10V55gi

 

–by ollie charles images from frontrowreviews.co.uk

_golden_globes_best_picture

Could it be that the Golden Globes actually have better taste than the Oscars? After all, Globe voters this year found room for critically lauded performances by Marion Cotillard (“Rust and Bone”), Rachel Weisz (“The Deep Blue Sea”), John Hawkes (“The Sessions”) and Richard Gere (“Arbitrage”) that the Academy voters overlooked. And the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (the group that picks the Globes) had the sense to nominate Kathryn Bigelow (“Zero Dark Thirty”) and credit the Globes’ unique practice of expanding the field by breaking out a separate Comedy/Musical category, as well as the idiosyncratic makeup of the HFPA (a small group of about 100 entertainment journalists, contrasted with the Academy’s 6,000 or so movie-industry professionals).

The result, however, is a slate that — this year, at least — matches up only roughly with the Oscar nominees list, making the predictive value of the Globes more dubious than usual. And vice versa; you can’t predict the Globes by guessing how the Academy would vote.

Still, judging by what the HFPA voters like — movies and performers with international appeal, classical Hollywood filmmaking, and familiar faces who’ll brighten their televised cocktail party — it’s not hard to guess which stars and movies will win when the trophies are handed out on Jan. 13. Here’s a cheat sheet for your home ballot.

BEST MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA
“Argo”
“Django Unchained”
“Life of Pi”
“Lincoln”
“Zero Dark Thirty”

In the night’s most important race (since it’s the most predictive of Oscar’s Best Picture category), where the Academy gave us a wide-open race among nine worthy contenders, the HFPA gives us essentially a two-horse competition between “Lincoln” and “Zero Dark Thirty”; the rest will be also-rans. “Lincoln” has the edge as a piece of classical filmmaking from Hollywood’s biggest brand-name director, but “Zero Dark Thirty” seems to have most of the awards momentum this season and is likely to squeak past.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA
Jessica Chastain (“Zero Dark Thirty”)
Marion Cotillard (“Rust and Bone”)
Helen Mirren (“Hitchcock”)
Naomi Watts (“The Impossible”)
Rachel Weisz (“The Deep Blue Sea”)

Just because I praised the Globe voters above for recognizing several of these performances that Academy members passed over doesn’t mean I don’t think that in the end, the HFPA will still go for Chastain, the hot rising star of the past couple years. For the rest, it’s just an honor to be nominated, though out of all of these, Cotillard or Watts could manage an upset for playing women in umimaginably extreme circumstances.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

Daniel Day-Lewis (“Lincoln”)
Richard Gere (“Arbitrage”)
John Hawkes (“The Sessions”)
Joaquin Phoenix (“The Master”)
Denzel Washington (“Flight”)

As with the actresses, Gere and Hawkes should be grateful just to have been invited. As much I’d love to see Phoenix win just to here what kind of gonzo acceptance speech the awards-averse actor would give, and tho i love more him more as Daniel Plainview but this race belongs to Day-Lewis, surely. Enough said.

BEST MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel
“Les Miserables”
“Moonrise Kingdom”
“Salmon Fishing in the Yemen”
“Silver Linings Playbook”

“Marigold” and “Yemen” are the kind of multinational comedies with older-audience appeal that hit the HFPA’s demographic sweet spot, and “Playbook” has buzz, but the smash “Les Mis” will take the category. Russel Crowe has a band, he’s the vocalist. Hugh Jackman i once saw him sang with Richard Marx. Anne Hathaway, oh boy, she’s not that bad at singing.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL
Emily Blunt (“Salmon Fishing in the Yemen”)
Judi Dench (“The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel”)
Jennifer Lawrence (“Silver Linings Playbook”)
Maggie Smith (“Quartet”)
Meryl Streep (“Hope Springs”)

Enough with Meryl Streep. I love Jen but Katniss Everdeen (who happens to be the only person in this category who also got an Oscar nod) is going to hit the bullseye on this target.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL
Jack Black (“Bernie”)
Bradley Cooper (“Silver Linings Playbook”)
Hugh Jackman (“Les Miserables”)
Ewan McGregor (“Salmon Fishing in the Yemen”)
Bill Murray (“Hyde Park on Hudson”)

It’s great that the HFPA are recognizing the Oscar-snubbed performances of Black, McGregor and Murray, but the race is between Cooper and Jackman. Cooper’s terrific in “Playbook,” but i will go with Dave Mustaine of Megadeth on this one Jackman’s titanic Jean Valjean in “Les Miz” is going to carry this one.

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM
“Brave”
“Frankenweenie”
“Hotel Transylvania”
“Rise of the Guardians”
“Wreck-It Ralph”

It’s either “Frankenweenie” or “Brave”. Sorry Burton, but when it comes to Pixar i have to be brave on choosing “Brave”.

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
“Amour”
“A Royal Affair”
“The Intouchables”
“Kon-Tiki”
“Rust and Bone”

I am wondering why HFPA snubbed Emmanuelle Riva. She’s my fave on Best Actress category on Oscar next February. Maybe “Amour” was categorized in Foreign Languange Film. I don’t know. But “Amour” it is. In the name of love.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

Amy Adams (“The Master”)
Sally Field (“Lincoln”)
Anne Hathaway (“Les Miserables”)
Helen Hunt (“The Sessions”)
Nicole Kidman (“The Paperboy”)

You were good Mrs. Lincoln but no offense this prize belongs to the heart-rending Hathaway of “Les Mis.” She deserves it more.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE
Alan Arkin (“Argo”)
Leonardo DiCaprio (“Django Unchained”)
Philip Seymour Hoffman (“The Master”)
Tommy Lee Jones (“Lincoln”)
Christoph Waltz (“Django Unchained”)

This may be the toughest Globe race to call. DiCaprio? Hmm.. Not now amigo.  Waltz? You’re not Hans Landa this time. Arkin? Nope. It’s two horse race between Hoffman and Jones. Hoffman’s best role was at “Capote”. So i’ll go with Tommy Lee Jones though i hate the wig.

BEST DIRECTOR – MOTION PICTURE
Ben Affleck (“Argo”)
Kathryn Bigelow (“Zero Dark Thirty”)
Ang Lee (“Life of Pi”)
Steven Spielberg (“Lincoln”)
Quentin Tarantino (“Django Unchained”)

It’s really between Spielberg and Bigelow. It’s political thingy. “Lincoln” is not my fave Spielberg’s  movie. “Schindler’s List” or “Saving Private Ryan” attracted me more. But who has bigger role in America history? Abe or Osama? Yes i’ll go with Spielberg.

BEST SCREENPLAY – MOTION PICTURE
Mark Boal (“Zero Dark Thirty”)
Tony Kushner (“Lincoln”)
David O. Russell (“Silver Linings Playbook”)
Quentin Tarantino (“Django Unchained”)
Chris Terrio (“Argo”)

Again, it’s a battle between “Zero Dark Thirty” and “Lincoln.” Again i’ll go with Kusner’s “Lincoln”

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE – MOTION PICTURE
Mychael Danna (“Life of Pi”)
Alexandre Desplat (“Argo”)
Dario Marianelli (“Anna Karenina”)
Tom Tykwer, Johnny Klimek, Reinhold Heil (“Cloud Atlas”)
John Williams (“Lincoln”)

I’m a fan of Alexandre Desplat. But it’s not his year. It’s either John Williams or Mychael Danna. His scoring is my lullaby. Me easily get carried away. Eversince “The Imaginarium of Dr Parnassus”, you have my vote Mr. Danna!

BEST ORIGINAL SONG – MOTION PICTURE
“For You” from “Act of Valor” (Monty Powell, Keith Urban)
“Not Running Anymore” from “Stand Up Guys” (Jon Bon Jovi)
“Safe & Sound” from “The Hunger Games” (Taylor Swift, John Paul White, Joy Williams, T Bone Burnett)
“Skyfall” from “Skyfall” (Adele, Paul Epworth)
“Suddenly” from “Les Miserables” (Claude-Michel Schonberg, Alain Boublil, Herbert Kretzmer)

In celebrating 50 years the James Bond franchise, well it’s not James Bond’s best song. Garbage and Carly Simon still top on my list. But  Adele still probably gets it, so “Skyfall” it is.

Well after all. It’s just a prediction. I may be wrong. But at least more than 30% of my predictions are gonna get along with HFPA. So place your bet before it’s too late.

— image from screencrush.com some words taken from moviefone.com

Quvenzhane Wallis
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences made history Thursday nominating both the oldest — Emmanuelle Riva, 85, in “Amour” — and the youngest –Quvenzhane Wallis, 9, in “Beasts of the Southern Wild” — actresses in the best actress category.
_amour_t614
The two will compete against Naomi Watts for her role in“The Impossible,” Jessica Chastain for “Zero Dark Thirty”and Jennifer Lawrence for “Silver Linings Playbook.” Wallis, who shot the part when she was only 6, had never acted before starring in Benh Zeitlin’s tale of life in the Bayou, while Riva has been at her craft since 1958. Both are nominated for the first time.
Yet they are up against three actresses, all with previous nominations to their name. Chastain was an unknown two years ago, yet today marks the 35-year old actress’s second nomination in two years for her lead role as CIA analyst Maya in Kathryn Bigelow‘s drama“Zero Dark Thirty.” (She was nominated last year for a supporting role in “The Help.”) Lawrence, 22, is also an over-achiever, landing her second nomination Thursday morning for her role as a neurotic young widow in David O. Russell‘s romantic dramedy. Her first nomination was for 2010’s “Winter’s Bone.” She was named best actress by the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn. and is nominated for both a Golden Globe and SAG Award. Lawrence is vowing to have a better time this year then in 2011, when the pressure of the night and the events leading up to the show led her call it quits on Oscar night by 10:30. “I was already in bed by then,” she said.
It should help that her castmates Bradley Cooper, Jackie Weaver and Robert DeNiro will all be on hand as fellow nominees to help her celebrate. “I have a feeling that no one will allow me to do that this time around,” said Lawrence, who admitted feeling overwhelmed by both the fashion stress and the red carpet interviews. “There is so much pressure that last time I didn’t enjoy it so much. This time I’m going to not let there be too much pressure and just have fun.” Naomi Watts, 44, was nominated for her part in Juan Antonio Bayona’s harrowing disaster tale “The Impossible.” The actress, 44, previously was nominated for the 2003 drama “21 Grams.” She’s also nominated this year for a Golden Globe and SAG Award.
The news is sweet for Watts, who watched the nominations on TV even though she vowed she wouldn’t for fear of being disappointed. While she wishes more of the cast and filmmakers from “The Impossible” were recognized for their work, she was thrilled to receive well wishes from them Thursday morning–and to specifically receive an email from Maria Belon, the real-life woman on whom her role was based. “She wrote something, like she always does, that made me cry,” said Watts. “It’s the message I was waiting for.” Watts is going to try to approach the remainder of the season with the same attitude she believes Belon would. “I feel so connected to this movie and to Maria and her story,” she added. “She would enjoy it. She’s someone that has such a joy of life. I’m always trying to take a page out of her book.” Last year, Viola Davis (“The Help”) and Meryl Streep (“The Iron Lady”) went head to head throughout the Oscar season with Streep taking home the ultimate prize, for the first time in 29 years. The 85th Academy Awards will take place Feb. 24 at Hollywood’s Dolby Theatre.
— article written by nicole sperling for latimes.com riva’s image from telegraph.co.uk

 

_dga-awards

The Directors Guild of America has released nominees for its Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film award, which will be presented at the 65th annual DGA Awards Dinner on February 2 at Hollywood & Highland. The guild will reveal its TV noms tomorrow. Here’s the film list, a group that includes first-time nominee Ben Affleck (Argo) and 11-time nominee Steven Spielberg (Lincoln):

BEN AFFLECK
Argo
(Warner Bros. Pictures)
Mr. Affleck’s Directorial Team:
· Unit Production Manager: Amy Herman
· First Assistant Director: David Webb
· Second Assistant Director: Ian Calip
· Second Second Assistant Directors: Clark Credle, Gavin Kleintop
· First Assistant Director (Turkey Unit): Belkis Turan
This is Mr. Affleck’s first DGA Feature Film Award nomination.

KATHRYN BIGELOW
Zero Dark Thirty
(Columbia Pictures)
Ms. Bigelow’s Directorial Team:
· Unit Production Manager: Colin Wilson
· First Assistant Director: David A. Ticotin
· Second Assistant Directors: Ben Lanning, Sarah Hood
· First Assistant Director (Jordan Unit): Scott Robertson
· Second Assistant Directors (Jordan Unit): Jonas Spaccarotelli, Yanal Kassay
· Second Second Assistant Director (Jordan Unit): Tarek Afifi
· Unit Production Manager (India Unit): Rajeev Mehra
This is Ms. Bigelow’s second DGA Feature Film Award nomination. She won the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film for The Hurt Locker in 2009.

TOM HOOPER
Les Misérables
(Universal Pictures)
Mr. Hooper’s Directorial Team:
· Unit Production Manager: Patrick Schweitzer
· First Assistant Director: Ben Howarth
· Second Assistant Director: Harriet Worth
· Second Second Assistant Director: Dan Channing Williams
This is Mr. Hooper’s second DGA Feature Film Award nomination. He won the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film for The King’s Speech (2010) and was previously nominated for the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Movies for Television/Mini-Series for John Adams in 2008.

ANG LEE
Life of Pi
(Twentieth Century Fox)
Mr. Lee’s Directorial Team:
· Unit Production Manager: Michael J. Malone
· Unit Production Manager (Taiwan): Leo Chen
· First Assistant Directors: William M. Connor, Cliff Lanning
· Second Assistant Directors: Robert Burgess, Ben Lanning
· Unit Production Manager (India Unit): Sanjay Kumar
· First Assistant Director (India Unit): Nitya Mehra
· Second Assistant Director (India Unit): Ananya Rane
· Second Second Assistant Directors (India Unit): Namra Parikh, Freya Parekh
· Second Assistant Directors (Montreal Unit): Derek Wimble, Renato De Cotiis
This is Mr. Lee’s fourth DGA Feature Film Award nomination. He won the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film for Brokeback Mountain (2005) and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000) and was nominated for Sense and Sensibility in 1995.

STEVEN SPIELBERG
Lincoln
(DreamWorks Pictures/Twentieth Century Fox)
Mr. Spielberg’s Directorial Team:
· Unit Production Manager: Susan McNamara
· First Assistant Director: Adam Somner
· Second Assistant Director: Ian Stone
· Second Second Assistant Directors: Eric Lasko, Trevor Tavares
This is Mr. Spielberg’s eleventh DGA Feature Film Award nomination. He won the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film three times for Saving Private Ryan (1998), Schindler’s List (1993) and The Color Purple (1985). He was also nominated in this category for Munich (2005), Amistad (1997), Empire of the Sun (1987), E.T.: The Extra Terrestrial (1982), Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) and Jaws (1975). Mr. Spielberg was honored with the DGA’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2000.

 

— article taken from deadline.com

African-American Film Critics name ‘Zero Dark Thirty’ best film

1134604 - Zero Dark Thirty
“Zero Dark Thirty,” Kathryn Bigelow‘s chronicle of the search for terrorist Osama bin-Laden, continued its winning ways Sunday evening when it was named best film of 2012 by the African-American Film Critics Association.

The film, which opens Wednesday, has already won best film honors from the New York Film Critics Circle and the National Board of Review, and it received best film nominations last week for the Critics’ Choice Movie Awards and the Golden Globes.

But it was Ava DuVernay‘s drama about how a marriage is affected when the husband goes to prison, “Middle of Nowhere,” that was the big winner Sunday, receiving four awards: actress for Emayatzy Corinealdi, screenplay for DuVernay, independent film and music for Kathryn Bostic & Morgan Rhodes.

THE ENVELOPE: AWARDS 2013

Ben Affleck was named best director for “Argo,” while actor honors went to Denzel Washington for “Flight.” Sally Fieldwas named best supporting actress for “Lincoln,” and Nate Parker earned the supporting actor award for “Arbitrage.”

France’s “The Intouchables” was named best foreign film, while young Quvenzhane Wallis received breakout performance for “Beasts of the Southern Wild.”

Animation honors went to “Rise of the Guardians.” There was a tie for documentary between “The House I Live In” and “Versailles ’73.”

The organization also selected 10 films of distinction for 2012: “Zero Dark Thirty,” “Argo,” “Lincoln,” “Middle of Nowhere,” “Life of Pi,” “Les Miserables,” Django Unchained,” “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” “Moonrise Kingdom” and “Think Like a Man.”

Billy Dee WilliamsCicely Tyson, Clint Culpepper and Rainforest Films were Special Achievement Award recipients.

The African-American Film Critics Assn. will present the awards in a private ceremony Feb. 8 at the Taglyan Complex in Hollywood.

(By Susan King for latimes.com)

 

Hollywood Foreign Press Association, 2013 Golden Globes Announcement

1.    BEST MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

a.    ARGO
Warner Bros. Pictures, GK Films, Smokehouse Pictures; Warner Bros. Pictures

b.    DJANGO UNCHAINED
The Weinstein Company, Columbia Pictures; The Weinstein Company/Sony Pictures Releasing

c.    LIFE OF PI
Fox 2000 Pictures; Twentieth Century Fox

d.    LINCOLN
DreamWorks Pictures, Twentieth Century Fox; Touchstone Pictures

e.    ZERO DARK THIRTY
Columbia Pictures and Annapurna Pictures; Sony Pictures Releasing

2.    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

a.    Jessica Chastain     ZERO DARK THIRTY

b.    Marion Cotillard    RUST AND BONE

c.    Helen Mirren    HITCHCOCK

d.    NAOMI WATTS     THE IMPOSSIBLE

e.    Rachel Weisz     THE DEEP BLUE SEA

3. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

a.    Daniel Day-Lewis     LINCOLN

b.    Richard Gere         ARBITRAGE

c.    JOHN HAWKES         THE SESSIONS

d.    Joaquin Phoenix     THE MASTER

e.    Denzel Washington FLIGHT

4.    BEST MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL
Blueprint Pictures/Participant Media; Fox Searchlight Pictures

b.    LES MISERABLES
Universal Pictures, A Working Title Films/Cameron Mackintosh Productions; Universal Pictures

c.    MOONRISE KINGDOM
Indian Paintbrush; Focus Features

d.    SALMON FISH IN GIN THE YEMEN
CBS Films; CBS Films

e.    SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK
The Weinstein Company; The Weinstein Company

5.    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    Emily Blunt         SALMON FISHING IN THE YEMEN

b.    Judi Dench             THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL

c.    Jennifer Lawrence  SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK

d.    Maggie Smith         QUARTET

e.    Meryl Streep         HOPE SPRINGS

6. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    Jack Black             BERNIE

b.    BRADLEY COOPER     SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK

c.    Hugh Jackman         LES MISERABLES

d.    Ewan McGregor     SALMON FISHING IN THE YEMEN

e.    Bill Murray         HYDE PARK ON HUDSON

7.    BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

a.    BRAVE
Walt Disney Pictures, Pixar Animation Studios; Walt Disney Pictures

b.    FRANKENWEENIE
Walt Disney Pictures; Walt Disney Pictures

c.    HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA
Columbia Pictures / Sony Pictures Animation; Sony Pictures Releasing

d.    RISE OF THE GUARDIANS
DreamWorks Animation LLC; Paramount Pictures

e.    WRECK-IT RALPH
Walt Disney Pictures, Walt Disney Animation Studios; Walt Disney Pictures

8.    BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

a.    AMOUR (AUSTRIA)
Les Films Du Losange, X Filme Creative Pool, Wega Film; Sony Pictures Classics

b.    AROYALAFFAIR (DENMARK)
(En kongelig affære) 
Zentropa Entertainment; Magnolia Pictures

c.    THE INTOUCHABLES (FRANCE)
(Les Intouchables) 
The WeinstenCompany, Quad Productions, Gaumont, TF1 Films Production, Ten Films, Chaocorp; The Weinstein Company

d.    KON-TIKI (NORWAY/UK/DENMARK)
Nordisk Film Production, Recorded Picture Company; The Weinstein Company

e.    RUST AND BONE (FRANCE)
(De rouille et d’os) 
Page 114, Why Not Productions; Sony Pictures Classics

9. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

a.    Amy Adams             THE MASTER

b.    Sally Field             LINCOLN

c.    Anne Hathaway     LES MISERABLES

d.    Helen Hunt         THE SESSIONS

e.    Nicole Kidman         THE PAPERBOY

10. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

a.    Alan Arkin                 ARGO

b.    Leonardo DiCaprio         DJANGO UNCHAINED

c.    Philip Seymour Hoffman  THE MASTER

d.    Tommy Lee Jones          LINCOLN

e.    Christoph Waltz         DJANGO UNCHAINED

11. BEST DIRECTOR – MOTION PICTURE

a.    Ben Affleck             ARGO

b.    Kathryn Bigelow         ZERO DARK THIRTY

c.    Ang Lee                 LIFE OF PI

d.    Steven Spielberg         LINCOLN

e.    Quentin Tarantino         DJANGO UNCHAINED

12. BEST SCREENPLAY – MOTION PICTURE

a.    Mark Boal                 ZERO DARK THIRTY

b.    Tony Kushner             LINCOLN

c.    David O. Russell         SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK

d.    Quentin Tarantino         DJANGO UNCHAINED

e.    CHRIS TERRIO             ARGO

13. BEST ORIGINAL SCORE – MOTION PICTURE

a.    MYCHAEL DANNA         LIFE OF PI

b.    Alexandre Desplat     ARGO

c.    Dario Marianelli         ANNA KARENINA

d.    TOM TYKWER,            CLOUD ATLAS

e.     JOHNNY KLIMEK,

f.    REINHOLD HEIL

g.    John Williams             LINCOLN

14. BEST ORIGINAL SONG – MOTION PICTURE

a.    “FOR YOU” — ACT OF VALOR
Music by: Monty Powell, Keith Urban Lyrics by: Monty Powell, Keith Urban

b.    “NOT RUNNING ANYMORE”—STAND UP GUYS
Music by: Jon Bon Jovi Lyrics by: Jon Bon Jovi

c.    “SAFE & SOUND” — THE HUNGER GAMES
Music by: Taylor Swift, John Paul White, Joy Williams, T Bone Burnett Lyrics by: Taylor Swift, John Paul White, Joy Williams, T Bone Burnett

d.    “SKYFALL”—SKYFALL
Music by: Adele, Paul Epworth Lyrics by: Adele, Paul Epworth

e.    “SUDDENLY” — LES MISERABLES
Music by: Claude-Michel Schonberg
Lyrics by: Alain Boublil, Claude-Michel Schonberg

15. BEST TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

a.    BREAKING BAD
AMC 
Sony Pictures Television

b.    BOARDWALK EMPIRE
HBO 
Leverage, Closest to the Hole Productions, Sikelia Productions and Cold Front Productions in association with HBO Entertainment

c.    DOWNTON ABBEY: SEASON 2
PBS 
A Carnival / Masterpiece Co-Production

d.    HOMELAND
SHOWTIME 
SHOWTIME, Teakwood Lane Productions, Cherry Pie Productions, Keshet, Fox 21

e.    THE NEWSROOM
HBO 
HBO Entertainment

16. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

a.    CONNIE BRITTON                 NASHVILLE

b.    Glenn Close                 DAMAGES

c.    Claire Danes                 HOMELAND

d.    MICHELLE DOCKERY             DOWNTON ABBEY: SEASON 2

e.    Julianna Margulies          THE GOOD WIFE

17. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

a.    Steve Buscemi                 BOARDWALK EMPIRE

b.    Bryan Cranston              BREAKING BAD

c.    Jeff Daniels                 THE NEWSROOM

d.    Jon Hamm                      MAD MEN

e.    Damian Lewis                 HOMELAND

18. BEST TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    THE BIG BANG THEORY
CBS 
Chuck Lorre Productions, Inc. in association with Warner Bros. Television

b.    EPISODES
SHOWTIME 
SHOWTIME, Hat Trick Productions, Crane Klarik Productions

c.    GIRLS
HBO 
Apatow Productions and I am Jenni Konner Productions in association with HBO Entertainment

d.    MODERN FAMILY
ABC 
Levitan-Lloyd Productions in association with Twentieth Century Fox Television

e.    SMASH
NBC

19. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    ZOOEY DESCHANEL                     NEW GIRL

b.    Julia Louis-Dreyfus                 VEEP

c.    LENA DUNHAM                         GIRLS

d.    Tina Fey                                 30 ROCK

e.    Amy Poehler                         PARKS AND RECREATION

20. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    Alec Baldwin                         30 ROCK

b.    Don Cheadle                         HOUSE OF LIES

c.    LOUIS C.K.                             LOUIE

d.    Matt LeBlanc                         EPISODES

e.    Jim Parsons                             THE BIG BANG THEORY

21. BEST MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

a.    GAME CHANGE
HBO 
Playtone and Everyman Pictures in association with HBO Films

b.    THE GIRL
HBO 
A Wall to Wall, Warner Bros Entertainment GmbH, Moonlighting and BBC Production in association with HBO Films

c. HATFIELDS & MCCOYS 
HISTORY Thinkfactory Media in association with History

d.    THE HOUR
BBC AMERICA 
Kudos Film and Television/BBC America co-production

e.    POLITICAL ANIMALS
USA NETWORK Berlanti Productions and Laurence Mark Productions in association with Warner Horizon Television

22. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

a.    Nicole Kidman                     HEMINGWAY & GELLHORN

b.    Jessica Lange                     AMERICAN HORROR STORY: ASYLUM

c.    SIENNA MILLER                     THE GIRL

d.    Julianne Moore                 GAME CHANGE

e.    Sigourney Weaver                  POLITICAL ANIMALS

23. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

a.    Kevin Costner                     HATFIELDS & MCCOYS

b.    BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH              SHERLOCK (MASTERPIECE)

c.    Woody Harrelson                 GAME CHANGE

d.    TOBY JONES                         THE GIRL

e.    Clive Owen                         HEMINGWAY & GELLHORN

24. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

a.    HAYDEN PANETTIERE                 NASHVILLE

b.    ARCHIE PANJABI                     THE GOOD WIFE

c.    Sarah Paulson                     GAME CHANGE

d.    Maggie Smith                     DOWNTON ABBEY: SEASON 2

e.    Sofia Vergara                      MODERN FAMILY

25. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

a.    MAX GREENFIELD                 NEW GIRL

b.    Ed Harris                         GAME CHANGE

c.    DANNY HUSTON                     MAGIC CITY

d.    Mandy Patinkin                 HOMELAND

e.    Eric Stonestreet                 MODERN FAMILY

 

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