Category: Film & Music Awards


It’s Tribeca time again as the film fest kicks off tomorrow in typical New York fashion with The National rock-doc Mistaken for Strangers.

Ryland Aldrich, the festival editor, wrote for twitchfilm.com that at that film, the other galas, and the midnight lineup yesterday — and today we turn our attention to the documentary and narrative competitions. The documentary competition specifically has become a real focus for Tribeca in recent years. Here are a few films in each of those sections that caught our eye. Read more about the festival here: http://bit.ly/14tF6OT

World Documentary Competition
MICHAEL H. PROFESSION: DIRECTOR
Prolific behind-the-scenes documentarian Yves Montmayeur takes a look at the man, the myth, the legend, and the twitter account of director Michael Haneke.


TEENAGE
Based on a book by Jon Savage and narrated by Jena Malone, Ben Whishaw, Julia Hummer and Jessie Usher, director Matt Wolf’s documentary examines the very notion of an age existing between childhood and life as an adult.


POWERLESS
Fahad Mustafa and Deepti Kakkar’s documentary looks at modern day Robin Hoods who put themselves at great risk by robbing electricity from paying customers to provide it to those too poor for power.


OXYANA
Sean Dunne’s feature directorial debut is this look at the OxyContin abuse epidemic gripping the small town of Oceana, West Virginia. The film is scored by indie folk band Deer Tick.


ALIAS RUBY BLADE: A STORY OF LOVE AND REVOLUTION
Docu editor Alex Meiller’s (Capitalism: A Love Story) directorial debut is this enthralling-looking docu about Timor-Leste covert documentarian-turned-activist Kirsty Sword Gusmão.


BIG MEN
Rachel Boynton (Our Brand is Crisis) takes a look at the huge personal costs of big oil doing business in West Africa in her latest docu, executive produced by Brad Pitt


THE KILL TEAM
Veteran docu cinematographer Dan Krauss reports firsthand accounts of battlefield from the US soldiers accused of gratuitous killings of Afghan civilians.

World Narrative Competition


SUNLIGHT JR.
Naomi Watts and Matt Dillon star in this Florida-set domestic poverty drama from Laurie Collyer, director of Sundance 2006 awards title Sherrybaby.


WILL YOU STILL LOVE ME TOMORROW?
Arvin Chen‘s follow-up to Au Revoir Taipei takes another crack at the Taiwanese romantic comedy genre with this multi-threaded Berlin-premiering narrative.


BLUEBIRD
Indie editor Lance Edmands’s (Tiny Furniture, Nobody Walks) feature directorial debut is this small town drama starring Amy Morton, John Slattery, Louisa Krause, Emily Meade, Margo Martindale, and Adam Driver.


THE ROCKET
This rural Laos-set adventure from Aussie director Kim Mordaunt looks to be all kinds of fun.


BEFORE SNOWFALL
There may not be a lot of competition, but it is completely fair to call Hisham Zaman‘s border crossing adventure the most interesting sounding Kurdish language Norwegian-German co-production this year.


THE BROKEN CIRCLE BREAKDOWN
My quick pitch for Felix Van Groeningen’s follow-up to Cannes ’09 title The Misfortunates is a Flemish Blue Valentine involving a couple who are obsessed with American country/western living.

 

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So which one do you prefer?

Culled from over 2800 entries, the 60 films that will play in New York will compete for Oscar contention.

WHERE THEY GO: Elijah Wood
Katy Winn/Getty Images

The Tribeca Film Festival‘s 2013 lineup has added 60 short films that run the gamut from documentary to narrative and experimental and include stars such as Elijah WoodElle Fanning and Lauren Ambrose.

The program is broken down into eight categories, with themes that include first person narrative, late night genre (think: vampires and werewolves), New York City and apocalyptic disasters.

Beyond festival recognition, the winners of Tribeca’s Best Narrative Short award and Best Documentary Short awards will be automatically qualified for next year’s Academy Awards, circumventing other required points of entry.

The festival, in its 12th year, received over 2800 entries, and the final selection of 60 films represent 19 different nations. Read more here: http://bit.ly/WFmFDj

The Tribeca Film Festival will run from April 17-28, kicked off by an opening night documentary about and concert starring indie rock band The National. The roster of full length features that will play at the festival include projects from Paul RuddJulianne MooreRussell CroweJohn Slattery and Naomi Watts.

 

SXSW Danny Boyle

So far one of the highlights of SXSW was the panel featuring director Danny Boyle. The enthusiasm he shared with Jack Giroux from filmschoolrejects.com about the event was evident during his Q&A. Even when the nifty “Danny Boyle’s Filmography” montage Fox Searchlight cut together was playing we saw Boyle dancing to it. He was happy to be there, and so were we.

While the Slumdog Millionaire director was there to promote Trance, Boyle discussed many of his films, and the lessons he learned from them. Unfortunately he didn’t have time to reminisce about all his movies, but what the director of Trance did talk about was noteworthy. Read more here:  http://bit.ly/Y7DUbk

That’s why we took notes:

Become a Great Filmmaker By Showing Interest in Priesthood 

“There are similarities [between a director and a priest]. There’s directing in priesthood and pouncing around. There are a number of directors who were going to be priests, like, Martin Scorsese and John Woo. Confessing your sins with movies is nice. You go to these dark places and access your darker side.”

Study Actors

“Theater is a much easier place to access, and you learn skills there. I learned how to deal with actors and the secrets. In the new film, TranceRosario Dawson says, ’5% of the population is extremely suggestible.’ They use techniques to find the 5%, and they’re often actors who want to change and do things that change them. I think you get that with an actor: wanting to experience something as an actor and as a storyteller. You have to trust your actor be a storyteller. Most people go to the cinema to see the actors.”

Your First Movie Has a Magic You Might Not Get Back

“Yeah, I think there’s something wonderful about your first time. Film is so technical. There’s so many elements that are manipulative, which you construct specifically to produce an effect. There’s a worry you’ll lose the innocence of your first try.

Lie to Financiers and Win an Oscar 

“There’s a perversity in there that’s delicious. We used Slumdog‘s impact to make a film we wanted to make. Nobody was going to make [127 Hours] because it’s a guy alone for six days and cuts his arm off. You lie to them, ‘Yeah, it’s an action movie with one guy!’. [For Slumdog] We didn’t tell them a third of it was going to be in Hindi. Sure, some kids get their eyes taken out, but it’s like Amelie crossed with Trainspotting! You’ll say anything to get your film made.

“Too MTV” Isn’t a Bad Thing 

“I was watching The Big Chill on the way over here, and those were bold choices. The Doors and Ride of the Valkyries in Apocalypse Now…I mean this whole realistic world is now being shown through this prism. When we started with Shallow Grave and Trainspotting we did that, but we were attacked as being ‘too MTV.’ They said they were like music videos. I thought it was a compliment at the time. People are living their life like that. I see my life like pop music, singing to myself and seeing it here and there.”

The Power of Music

“My coming of age was puck. In 1978 I was 20, and that was an amazing time for me. 15 years later there was rave culture in Britian, and I was just about old enough to go enjoy that. I was 35, around when I started making films. Although the book [“Trainspotting”] is about drugs, the film is about dance culture. We did that unapolgetically. We wanted to make a drug movie you could watch, since most are so depressing. Maybe someone does heroin, throws up, and sits in a corner for 10 hours, but that’s not cinematic. The drug does destroy people in the film, but the rhythm of the film can be expressed with a different tempo. That’s why the music in Trainspotting…there’s a hidden path from pop to electronic down music and then to Brit pop.”

Movies Should Assault

“I love energy in movies. I want my films to mesmerize people. I used to get that with Nic Roeg films, where I’m pinned by the characters and there’s no oxygen…I want the rabbit in the headlights. We don’t go to a dark room to discuss a film, but feel it and experience it. If it’s a dumb action movie, you may not want to. Depends on the context. When you’ve paid 12 dollars, I want you to be assaulted by the film. I want the film to assault you.”

A Few Other Tidbits From Boyle

  • “In the films we make, we try to change genre so you don’t go in, ‘I know how to do this.’ I’ve done that before, and it’s not good for you. You should try to work it out.”
  • “The risk taking you shouldn’t do is what you should do, but you should cover your back. Those risks make your films standout.”
  • “I was never a fan of zombie movies. I never thought we were making one [with 28 Days Later], but that’s what everyone calls it. It’s gone on to kick off a renewal of interest, including a TV show we have no rights for.”
  • “When I go to a movie I’m happy to let myself be changed by the experience.”
  • “I have a terrible temper. There were a few moments on The Olympics where I was vile, which was surprising. In a huge, corporate thing like that, you have to defend your patch.”
  • When it came to turning down knighthood, Boyle said, “Just wasn’t my cup of tea, really. I have no interest in that.”

From the outside, it looked like Steven Spielberg’s political biopic would walk the Oscars, but canny campaigning saw Ben Affleck‘s Iran-hostage drama pip it at the post. Here’s how they did it

Argo and Lincoln

Head to head … Argo and Lincoln

Argo‘s yo-yo awards season ended on an upswing on Sunday as the Tehran yarn clinched the Big Kahuna of movie honours. Ben Affleck‘s third outing as director endured the proverbial rollercoaster ride over the past five months and the Warner Bros crowd will be partying late into the night after winning best picture. This was the first time since Driving Miss Daisy in 1989 that the prize had gone to a movie whose director had not been nominated for an Oscar.

  1. Argo
  2. Production year: 2012
  3. Country: USA
  4. Cert (UK): 15
  5. Runtime: 120 mins
  6. Directors: Ben Affleck
  7. Cast: Alan Arkin, Ben Affleck, Bryan Cranston, Christopher Denham, Clea DuVall, John Goodman, Kerry Bishe, Rory Cochrane, Scoot McNairy, Tate Donovan, Victor Garber
  8. More on this film

The popular narrative of what has been an unusually high-calibre awards season is that Argo – the people’s favourite – snuck in at the eleventh hour to swipe the best picture prize from Lincoln. Not so. Argo never lost its high standing among voters and maintained its campaign momentum – albeit in a more nuanced manner in recent weeks – despite the mighty efforts of the publicity machine behind Steven Spielberg‘s august history lesson.

The campaign machine was chugging along nicely and then on 8 October, four days before Argo was due to open in US cinemas, Lincoln premiered at the New York film festival. Spielberg was about to throw a spanner in the works. Suddenly Argo was no longer the name on everyone’s lips. Lincoln was being hailed in some quarters as a masterpiece, perhaps Spielberg’s best since Schindler’s List. Hollywood lined up to kneel before the altar of Daniel Day-Lewis. An air of invincibility coalesced around Lincoln as the first awards groups prepared to announce their winners.

Day-Lewis as Abraham Lincoln was a match made in prestige movie heaven and the Anglo-Irish actor dominated his category, earning accolades from just about every awards group including the influential Screen Actors Guild, the largest voting block in the Academy. He duly won his third lead actor Oscar on Sunday and became the first man to do so. Spielberg did not make it on to the winners’ podium and, in a rare surprise on the night, had to watch as Ang Lee won best director for Life of Pi.

Read more here: http://bit.ly/XvUPak

By the start of the year Lincoln had garnered the most Golden Globe and Oscar nominations and was the perceived frontrunner. This suited the Argo camp, which wanted their contender to be the marginal underdog. At the Golden Globes in January, Lincoln suffered its first public reversal as Argo prevailed in the best dramatic picture contest and Affleck beat Spielberg in the directing category.

Two weeks later, over the course of one heady weekend, Argo delivered a one-two punch to land best picture at the Producers Guild of America and best ensemble cast at the Screen Actors Guild. On 3 February Affleck became only the third person to win the DGA award without an Oscar nomination. Two weeks later Chris Terrio won the WGA’s adapted screenplay honour. The votes for successive shows had already been cast. The late cascade of prizes may have seemed like people were suddenly championing Argo, but in reality the movie’s enduring pedigree never wavered and Hollywood had made up its mind.

 

 

Michael Haneke

 

Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

After several failed attempts, the director won the best foreign language film award for “Amour” as his home country had its best Oscar outing since 1961.

It’s been a long wait with several failed attempts, but Michael Haneke has finally won the best foreign language Oscar for his home country, Austria.

When Haneke’s Amour was named as the award winner Sunday night, it marked the end of a long struggle by the Austrian government to have Haneke’s films – many of which like Amour have been in French – accepted as properly Austrian in the eyes of the Academy.

Foreign language films can now be in any language other than English. Their nationality is determined by the creative force behind the film.

Read more here: http://bit.ly/YvM6B7

Alongside Haneke, that deep Austrian talent pool includes Vienna hometown hero Christoph Waltz, who took home his second best supporting actor Oscar Sunday for his role as German bounty hunter King Schultz in Quentin Tarantino‘s Django Unchained.

Two Austrian Oscars in one night – that hasn’t  happened since 1961, when Billy Wilder won three Oscars in a single year for The Apartment. The film took home the best picture, best director and best original screenplay honors that year.

 

  • Directing

    A government official in the director’s native Taiwan praises his accomplishment, while Indian stars tweet in delight over Lee’s statement in Hindi during his acceptance speech.

HONG KONG and DELHI – Just hours after bagging an Oscar statuette in Los Angeles, Ang Lee has been told of yet another award coming his way: an honorary citizen’s medal from the municipal authorities of Taichuing, the Taiwanese city where he shot the ocean scenes in Life of Pi.

Speaking to the Taiwanese CNA news agency, Taichung mayor Jason Hu – who watched the awards ceremony after a medical check-up in a Taipei hospital – said Lee deserves the Best Director prize, and that he thanked Lee for putting the island on the map by shooting Life of Pi there and then giving Taiwan a call-out in his acceptance speech.

Hu said Lee, who was born in southern Taiwan and left the island to study filmmaking in the US in 1979, should be accorded with recognition by the Taiwanese government, and he will make the filmmaker an honorary citizen of Taichung.

Read more about Ang Lee here: http://bit.ly/VHDmuV

Life of Pi has proven to be a hit in Taiwan, where it took US$15.6 million. The film also took about US$85 million on mainland China, an amount which surpassed its American earnings of US$69.6 million.

Meanwhile, Lee set the Indian blogosphere alight by concluding his acceptance speech on Sunday night with a salutation in Hindi.

“YES!!! Life of Pi wins four Oscars, with most deserved Best Director Oscar for Ang Lee, who ended speech with ‘Namaste,’” actor Kabir Bedi posted on his twitter account.

“Congratulations to the entire team of Life Of Pi and to the Genius called Ang Lee. Proud to have worked with him.:),” said a tweet by actor Anupam Kher,who was at the Oscar ceremony as part of the ensemble cast of Silver Linings Playbook. Kher — who also posted a photo of himself with Lee taken at a pre-Oscar party — had earlier worked with the two-time Oscar winning director in 2007’sLust, Caution.

“Ohhhh how beautiful to see Ang Lee on the stage. He truly truly truly deserves it,” tweeted actorAdil Hussain who stars in Life of Pi, playing the principal character’s father.

Perhaps the tweet that best captured the enthusiasm of Lee’s Oscar win and acceptance speech came from Bollywood banner Balaji Telefilms CEO Tanuj Garg: “Every Indian has just had an orgasm over Ang Lee’s ‘namaste.’”

 

After about six months of buzz, noise, gripes, campaigning, smearing and whatnot, the 85th Academy Awards are finally here. It’s been a long and eventful season and one of the most interesting in recent years if only because the winners weren’t locked up in advance like “The Artist” last year. In fact, it’s been one of the most up and down, surprising seasons in an age. “Argo” took the buzz early on in Telluride, “Silver Linings Playbook” took the baton after that in Toronto when it won the coveted Audience Award and then “Zero Dark Thirty,” “Lincoln” and “Life of Pi” entered the fray later in the fall and changed everything (remember when everyone thought “Les Misérables” would be the frontrunner after those reports of audiences crying and cheering?). But the “Argo” groundswell started to mount late in the game after director Ben Affleck was snubbed by the Academy during the nominations and the ground started moving under everyone’s feet again.

Read more about Oscars here: http://bit.ly/YqxuoM

Best Picture
“Amour”
WINNER: “Argo”
“Beasts Of The Southern Wild”
“Django Unchained”
“Les Misérables”
“Life Of Pi”
“Lincoln”
“Silver Linings Playbook”
“Zero Dark Thirty”

Best Director
Michael Haneke – “Amour”
Benh Zeitlin – “Beasts Of The Southern Wild”
WINNER: Ang Lee – “Life Of Pi”
Steven Spielberg – “Lincoln”
David O. Russell – “Silver Linings Playbook”

Best Actor In A Leading Role
Denzel Washington – “Flight”
Hugh Jackman – “Les Misérables”
Daniel Day-Lewis – “Lincoln”
Joaquin Phoenix – “The Master”
Bradley Cooper – “Silver Linings Playbook”

Best Actress In A Leading Role
Emmanuelle Riva – “Amour”
Quvenzhane Wallis – “Beasts Of The Southern Wild”
Naomi Watts – “The Impossible”
Jennifer Lawrence – “Silver Linings Playbook”
Jessica Chastain – “Zero Dark Thirty”

Best Actor In A Supporting Role
WINNER: Christoph Waltz – “Django Unchained”
Robert De Niro – “Silver Linings Playbook”
Alan Arkin – “Argo”
Tommy Lee Jones – “Lincoln”
Philip Seymour Hoffman – “The Master”

Best Actress In A Supporting Role
WINNER: Anne Hathaway – “Les Misérables”
Sally Field – “Lincoln”
Amy Adams “The Master”
Helen Hunt – “The Sessions”
Jacki Weaver – “Silver Linings Playbook”

Best Original Screenplay
Michael Haneke – “Amour”
WINNER: Quentin Tarantino – “Django Unchained”
John Gatins – “Flight”
Wes Anderson & Roman Coppola – “Moonrise Kingdom”
Mark Boal – “Zero Dark Thirty”

Best Adapted Screenplay
WINNER: Chris Terrio – “Argo”
Lucy Alibar, Benh Zeitlin – “Beasts of the Southern Wild”
David Magee – “Life of Pi”
Tony Kushner – “Lincoln”
David O. Russell – “Silver Linings Playbook”

Best Foreign Language Film
WINNER: “Amour”
“Kon-Tiki”
“No”
“A Royal Affair”
“War Witch”

Best Animated Feature Film
WINNER: “Brave”
“Frankenweenie”
ParaNorman
“The Pirates! Band of Misfits”
“Wreck-It Ralph”

Best Original Song
“Before My Time” – “Chasing Ice”
“Pi’s Lullaby” – “Life of Pi”
“Suddenly” – “Les Miserables
“Skyfall” – “Skyfall”
“Everybody Needs a Best Friend” – “Ted”

Best Cinematography
WINNER: Claudio Miranda – “Life of Pi”
Seamus McGarvey – “Anna Karenina”
Robert Richardson – “Django Unchained”
Janusz Kaminski – “Lincoln”
Roger Deakins – “Skyfall”

Best Film Editing
WINNER: William Goldenberg – “Argo”
Tim Squyres – “Life of Pi”
Michael Kahn – Lincoln
Jay Cassidy and Crispin Struthers – “Silver Linings Playbook”
William Goldenberg, Dylan Tichenor – Zero Dark Thirty

Best Costume Design
WINNER: Jacqueline Durran – “Anna Karenina”
Paco Delgado – “Les Misérables”
Joanna Johnston – “Lincoln”
Eiko Ishioka – “Mirror Mirror”
Colleen Atwood – “Snow White and the Huntsman

Best Documentary Feature
WINNER: “Searching For Sugar Man”
“5 Broken Cameras”
“The Gatekeepers”
“How To Survive A Plague”
“The Invisible War”

Best Visual Effects
WINNER: “Life of Pi”
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey
“Marvel’s The Avengers”
“Prometheus”
“Snow White and the Huntsman”

Best Production Design
WINNER:Rick Carter, Jim Erickson, Peter T Frank – “Lincoln”
Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer – “Anna Karenina”
Dan Hennah, Ra Vincent, Simon Bright – “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey”
Eve Stewart – “Les Misérables”
David Gropman, Anna Pinnock – “Life of Pi”

Best Original Score
WINNER: Mychael Danna – “Life of Pi”
Dario Marianelli – “Anna Karenina”
Alexandre Desplat – “Argo”
John Williams – “Lincoln”
Thomas Newman – “Skyfall”

Best Make Up
WINNER: “Les Misérables”
“Hitchcock”
“The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey”

Best Sound Editing
WINNER: (TIE) “Skyfall” and “Zero Dark Thirty”
“Argo”
“Django Unchained”
“Life of Pi”

Best Sound Mixing
WINNER: “Les Misérables”
“Argo”
“Life of Pi”
“Lincoln”
“Skyfall

Best Documentary Short Film
WINNER: “Inocente”
“Kings Point”
“Mondays At Racine”
“Open Heart”
“Redemption”

Best Animated Short
WINNER: “Paperman”
“Adam and Dog”
“Fresh Guacamole”
“Head Over Heels”
“Maggie Simpson In the Longest Daycare”

Best Live-Action Short Film
WINNER: “Curfew”
“Asad”
“Buzkashi Boys”
“Death of a Shadow”
“Henry”

Silver Linings Playbook Feel Good Movie - H 2013

The Weinstein Company
The 28th annual Independent Spirit Awards gala, hosted by Andy Samberg, is held as a luncheon in a tent on Santa Monica beach on Saturday, Feb 23. The Hollywood Reporter‘s live blog of the event can be found here or here: http://bit.ly/VErzxB

Below is a list of the nominees, with the winners marked in bold:

Best Feature
“Beasts Of The Southern Wild”
“Bernie”
“Keep The Lights On”
“Moonrise Kingdom”
Winner: “Silver Linings Playbook”

Best Director
Wes Anderson – “Moonrise Kingdom”
Julia Loktev – “The Loneliest Planet”
Winner: David O. Russell – “Silver Linings Playbook”
Ira Sachs – “Keep The Lights On”
Benh Zeitlin – “Beasts of the Southern Wild”

Best First Feature
“Fill The Void”
“Gimme The Loot”
“Safety Not Guaranteed”
“Sound Of My Voice”
Winner: “The Perks Of Being A Wallflower”

John Cassavetes Award
“Breakfast With Curtis”
“The Color Wheel”
Winner: “Middle Of Nowhere”
“Mosquita y Mari”
“Starlet”

Best Male Lead
Jack Black – “Bernie”
Bradley Cooper – “Silver Linings Playbook”
Winner: John Hawkes – “The Sessions”
Thure Lindhart – “Keep The Lights On”
Matthew McConaughey – “Killer Joe”
Wendell Pierce – “Four”

Best Female Lead
Linda Cardenelli – “Return”
Emayatzy Corinealdi – “Middle Of Nowhere”
Winner: Jennifer Lawrence – “Silver Linings Playbook”
Quvenzhane Wallis – “Beasts Of The Southern Wild”
Mary Elizabeth Winstead – “Smashed”

Best Supporting Male
Winner: Matthew McConaughey – “Magic Mike”
David Oyelowo – “Middle Of Nowhere”
Michael Pena – “End Of Watch”
Sam Rockwell – “Seven Psychopaths
Bruce Willis – “Moonrise Kingdom”

Best Supporting Female
Rosemarie DeWitt – “Your Sister’s Sister
Ann Dowd – “Compliance”
Winner: Helen Hunt – “The Sessions”
Brit Marling – “Sound Of My Voice”
Lorraine Toussaint – “MIddle Of Nowhere”

Best Screenplay
Wes Anderson – “Moonrise Kingdom”
Zoe Kazan – “Ruby Sparks”
Martin McDonagh – “Seven Psychopaths”
Winner: David O Russell – “Silver Linings Playbook”
Ira Sachs & Mauricio Zacharias – “Keep The Lights On”

Best First Screenplay
Rama Burshtein – “Fill The Void”
Winner: Derek Connolly – “Safety Not Guaranteed”
Christopher Ford – “Robot & Frank
Rashida Jones & Will McCormack – “Celeste & Jesse Forever
Jonathan Lisecki – “Gayby”

Best International Feature
Winner: “Amour”
“Once Upon A TIme In Anatolia”
“Rust & Bone”
“Sister”
“War Witch”

Best Documentary
“The Central Park Five”
“How To Survive A Plague”
Winner: “The Invisible War”
“Marina Abramovic: The Artist Is Present”
“The Waiting Room”

Best Cinematography
Winner: Ben Richardson, “Beasts Of The Southern Wild”
“End Of Watch”
“Here”
“Moonrise Kingdom”
“Valley Of The Saints”

Piaget Producers Award
Mynette Louie – “Stones In The Sun”
Derrick Tseng – “Prince Avalanche”
Alicia Van Couvering – “Nobody Walks”

Someone To Watch Award
David Fenster – “Pincus”
Adam Leon – “Gimme The Loot”
Rebecca Thomas – “Electrick Children”

Stella Artois Truer Than Fiction Award
Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Verena Pravel – “Leviathan”
Peter Nicks – “The Waiting Room”
Jasonyyyee Tippet and Elizabeth Mimms – “Only The Young”

Robert Altman Award
“Starlet”

 

1. Barbara Streisand’s Sheer Pantsuit (1969)

2. Demi Moore’s Bike Shorts with a Bustier and Huge Coat (1989)

Demi Moore's Bike Shorts with a Bustier and Huge Coat (1989)

Image by Darlene Hammond/Hulton Archive / Getty Images

3. Bon Jovi’s Baggy Purple Velvet Tux (1991)

Bon Jovi's Baggy Purple Velvet Tux (1991)

4. Geena Davis’ Pink Tutu (1992)

Geena Davis' Pink Tutu (1992)

5. Whoopi Goldberg as Mary Poppins Meets Barney (1993)

Whoopi Goldberg as Mary Poppins Meets Barney (1993)

Via: WireImage

6. Lizzy Gardiner’s Dress Made Out of American Express Gold Cards (1995)

Lizzy Gardiner's Dress Made Out of American Express Gold Cards (1995)

7. Nicole Kidman as a Curtain with Tasseled Trim (1997)

Nicole Kidman as a Curtain with Tasseled Trim (1997)

She basically dressed as a drawing room.

Image by Kevin Mazur/WireImage

8. Juliette Binoche as Velvet Dracula (1997)

Juliette Binoche as Velvet Dracula (1997)

9. Celine Dion in This All-White Getup (1999)

Celine Dion in This All-White Getup (1999)

She basically wore white pants, a long-sleeved turtleneck, and a fedora.

Image by Stringer / Getty Images

10. Trey Parker and Matt Stone as J.Lo and Gwyneth Paltrow (2000)

Trey Parker and Matt Stone as J.Lo and Gwyneth Paltrow (2000)

Image by David McNew / Getty Images

11. Faith Hill as Technicolor Cotton Candy (2001)

Faith Hill as Technicolor Cotton Candy (2001)

Image by Vince Bucci / Getty Images

12. Juliette Binoche as a Flapper (2001)

Juliette Binoche as a Flapper (2001)

She looks fine, almost, but the Oscars are not a costume party!

Image by Chris Weeks / Getty Images

13. Björk’s Swan Dress (2001)

Björk's Swan Dress (2001)

“Stop looking at me, swan!”

Via: SGranitz

14. Diane Keaton as Charlie Chaplin (2004)

Diane Keaton as Charlie Chaplin (2004)

Image by Vince Bucci/Stringer / Getty Images

15. Sally Kirkland’s Exploding Tent Dress (2007)

Sally Kirkland's Exploding Tent Dress (2007)

made by hillary reinsberg for buzzfeed.com read more here: http://bit.ly/VEqlCw

 

 

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