Tag Archive: Warner Bros


Kristen Bell as Veronica Mars. Image: Warner Bros

Nearly six years after the cancellation of the whip-smart television show about a teenage private eye in a California town deeply divided by class (and murder!), the Kickstarter for the Veronica Marsmovie ends later today, after breaking fundraising records and taking in over $5 million on the crowdfunding platform. The tremendous success of the Kickstarter, launched a month ago by creator Rob Thomas and actress Kristen Bell, has even inspired talk that this could change the way films get made — particularly for properties with devoted followings willing to put their money where their fandom is.

So what are the implications of Kickstarter resurrection and fan-funded film? What could this mean for other beloved (but cancelled) series like Freaks and Geeks or Chuck? And what happened to Veronica and her father after the cliffhanger at the end of Season 3? Wired talked to Thomas to find out or read more the interview here: http://bit.ly/ZprzQt

Wired: Do you think the success of your Kickstarter could be the start of a new business model for film? How do you see it working for other people who aspire to make movies?

Rob Thomas: I think it will be an important pioneer for a certain type of film. I’m not convinced that this will revolutionize how most movies get made, but I think there’s an opportunity now for projects that are similar to ours – that have some bit of public support behind it before they launch on Kickstarter… For something like Veronica Mars, where there’s a bit of a cult following and people are really emotionally invested in it, I do think this is a new avenue. There is no other way that this movie was going to get made.

Warner Bros owns the title Veronica Mars. I don’t… The lowest-priced movie Warner Bros tends to makes is a $30 million, and it goes up from there. They make Lord of the Rings. They don’t make theVeronica Mars movie, typically. So trying to convince Warner Bros to make a $30 million Veronica Marsmovie just wasn’t going to happen, for understandable reasons. When I took this project in, I didn’t take it in through their feature division. I’m making the movie with Warner Bros Digital; they do a lot of the smaller budget [projects]. I think we’re only going to be their second movie with a theatrical release; they typically do things straight to digital and digital download.

With this model, it’s almost a marketing device, a way to judge if there was enough interest in a movie this size. For a Friday Night Lights movie or a Freaks and Geek movie or a Chuck movie, I think it could be a possibility. I think this opens up a door. What I’m interested in as a writer is [if] a writer optioned a book and brought on an actor with some name value – if that combination could raise the money on Kickstarter to make a movie.

Wired: What would you think about Kickstarting a totally new movie project from scratch that didn’t have that preexisting recognition?

Rob Thomas: It would be so gutsy to do that. I started as a novelist, and I have novels. So I wonder, what if I took one of my books and maybe attached – not Kristen Bell … but an actor with that sort of renown and said, “We’re going to try and make this [movie] for $1.5 million dollars.” That would be such an interesting experiment. And I may try it. No one learns as much as when they do anything the first time, and I feel like I’ve learned so much that I have this knowledge that very few people in the world do about running a really big Kickstarter project. And if I never do it again, it’s wasted knowledge. But it’s also a lot of work. Having gotten TV shows on the air, that’s so much less work that trying to get theVeronica Mars movie made.

Wired: How does the financial model of the movie work, and how is the money being allocated?

Rob Thomas: It’s all going to the budget of the movie. We get to make a bigger movie the more money we make … The back end of the movie is divvied up like any other movie that gets made. The stars of the show will get a piece of the back end; the producer will get a piece of the back end. Clearly Warner Bros will own a big part of it. And I hope Warner Bros does well on it, because if not, they won’t make any more of these. I think there’s a scenario where everybody wins: where Kristen and I get to make the movie we’ve been hoping to make; where fans get to see the movie; and where Warner Bros makes money on it as well.

Wired: So in terms of the film’s plot, what’s happened to Veronica since the last time that we saw her at the end of Season 3?

Rob Thomas: Not only that was the last time she worked a case, but she left Neptune shortly there after. She ruins her father’s career as an officer of the law, and he gets indicted.

Wired: No!

Rob Thomas: Yes. Veronica transfers to Stanford, graduates, and goes to Columbia Law School.  And as we pick up the movie, it’s sort of like Tom Cruise at the beginning of The Firm. She’s finished law school, is waiting to take the bar, and interviewing with law firms. But then something happens in Neptune that pulls her back, and makes her metaphorically pick up her magnifying glass again.

Wired: A lot of Veronica’s appeal came from this sense that she was an underdog, but presumably in the adult world she’s getting recognition for her talents in ways that she didn’t from her cliquey high school classmates. Has her character outgrown that underdog status, or is that something you wanted to continue in the film?

Rob Thomas: It was certainly what I was working towards at the end of season 3. If we’d had a season 4, I wanted to get Veronica back into an underdog state. I think we liked Veronica best as a pariah of sorts.

Wired: How do you think fans’ attitudes and expectations about the show have changed since the show ended? Do they’re looking for nostalgia or growth in Veronica and the rest of the cast?

Rob Thomas: I think they’re looking for both. I know there’s something just automatically hook-y about a 17-year-old girl who’s a private eye. There’s less of a hook when it’s a 27-year-old woman. It’s a little more normal, a little more inside-the-box. … You have to make it work as a PI movie. And I understand the cons of nostalgia, but there are some Veronica Mars pleasure zones that I want to hit. If there were a [James] Bond movie and there wasn’t a martini scene – there are just certain things where I’d be cheating the audience if I didn’t include them. But I want it to work as a standalone movie as well for people who have never seen Veronica Mars, and just heard buzz about it and want to check it out finally when it’s a movie. I had never watched Firefly, but I’d heard the buzz so I went and saw the movie. I hope there are plenty of people who will give the Veronica Mars movie that chance.

Wired: One final question for you from Twitter: Any chance that the Party Down crew could cater the Neptune High 10-year reunion?

Rob Thomas: [laughs] There’s no chance. What’s funny is most of the members of the Party Downcrew have already played people on Veronica Mars. Adam Scott was a creepy teacher; Ken Marino is going to be in the movie as Vinnie Van Lowe. Someone like Martin Starr hasn’t been in Veronica Mars, so you might see him – but he won’t be catering it.

 

Warner Bros. Pictures has revealed the trailer for The Hangover Part III, hitting theaters on May 24. Check it out in the player below!The film stars Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms, Zach Galifianakis, Ken Jeong, Heather Graham, Jeffrey Tambor, Justin Bartha, John Goodman, Sasha Barrese, Gillian Vigman and Jamie Chung.The Hangover Part III is the third and final film in director Todd Phillips’ record-shattering comedy franchise. This time, there’s no wedding. No bachelor party. What could go wrong, right? But when the Wolfpack hits the road, all bets are off. The Trailer for The Hangover Part III is Here! – ComingSoon.net.

 

The Canadian twin sisters prepare to release their 7th studio album. Listen to it now.

Courtesy Warner Bros.

Courtesy Warner Bros.

Tegan & Sara were once heralded for their folky indie-rock sound. But as of late, the twin sisters have become an even bigger mainstream success, riding their self-made wave of 80′s inspired pop-rock-infused love songs. With their latest album Heartthrob taking on even happier synth sounds, unbridled love and sexual overtones, could they be the Vince Clarke and Andy Bell (Erasure) of 2013?

Building a base of real rock fans hit high gear when The Black Keys asked them to open a series of concert dates last October. “This is the thing, people that like licks, also like dance hits,” joked Tegan in an interview. But according to Sara, rock’s not the only genre they’d like to conquer. Although the duo recently collaborated with dance maven David Guetta, Sara said she’d even enjoy working with the masters of metal, Mastadon, proving the girls are truly up for anything.

Read more here http://x1075lasvegas.cbslocal.com/2013/01/28/tegan-sara-stream-new-pop-rock-album-heartthrob/

Discussing the weathered look of the album art, Sara confesses, “I love the idea that we make these albums and that they feel so in the moment and modern and vibrant and relevant and then like in two years, you feel it sort of slip away.”

Heartthrob hits stores tomorrow, January 29th. Listen to the album in its entirety here.

_dga-awards

The Directors Guild of America has released nominees for its Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film award, which will be presented at the 65th annual DGA Awards Dinner on February 2 at Hollywood & Highland. The guild will reveal its TV noms tomorrow. Here’s the film list, a group that includes first-time nominee Ben Affleck (Argo) and 11-time nominee Steven Spielberg (Lincoln):

BEN AFFLECK
Argo
(Warner Bros. Pictures)
Mr. Affleck’s Directorial Team:
· Unit Production Manager: Amy Herman
· First Assistant Director: David Webb
· Second Assistant Director: Ian Calip
· Second Second Assistant Directors: Clark Credle, Gavin Kleintop
· First Assistant Director (Turkey Unit): Belkis Turan
This is Mr. Affleck’s first DGA Feature Film Award nomination.

KATHRYN BIGELOW
Zero Dark Thirty
(Columbia Pictures)
Ms. Bigelow’s Directorial Team:
· Unit Production Manager: Colin Wilson
· First Assistant Director: David A. Ticotin
· Second Assistant Directors: Ben Lanning, Sarah Hood
· First Assistant Director (Jordan Unit): Scott Robertson
· Second Assistant Directors (Jordan Unit): Jonas Spaccarotelli, Yanal Kassay
· Second Second Assistant Director (Jordan Unit): Tarek Afifi
· Unit Production Manager (India Unit): Rajeev Mehra
This is Ms. Bigelow’s second DGA Feature Film Award nomination. She won the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film for The Hurt Locker in 2009.

TOM HOOPER
Les Misérables
(Universal Pictures)
Mr. Hooper’s Directorial Team:
· Unit Production Manager: Patrick Schweitzer
· First Assistant Director: Ben Howarth
· Second Assistant Director: Harriet Worth
· Second Second Assistant Director: Dan Channing Williams
This is Mr. Hooper’s second DGA Feature Film Award nomination. He won the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film for The King’s Speech (2010) and was previously nominated for the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Movies for Television/Mini-Series for John Adams in 2008.

ANG LEE
Life of Pi
(Twentieth Century Fox)
Mr. Lee’s Directorial Team:
· Unit Production Manager: Michael J. Malone
· Unit Production Manager (Taiwan): Leo Chen
· First Assistant Directors: William M. Connor, Cliff Lanning
· Second Assistant Directors: Robert Burgess, Ben Lanning
· Unit Production Manager (India Unit): Sanjay Kumar
· First Assistant Director (India Unit): Nitya Mehra
· Second Assistant Director (India Unit): Ananya Rane
· Second Second Assistant Directors (India Unit): Namra Parikh, Freya Parekh
· Second Assistant Directors (Montreal Unit): Derek Wimble, Renato De Cotiis
This is Mr. Lee’s fourth DGA Feature Film Award nomination. He won the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film for Brokeback Mountain (2005) and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000) and was nominated for Sense and Sensibility in 1995.

STEVEN SPIELBERG
Lincoln
(DreamWorks Pictures/Twentieth Century Fox)
Mr. Spielberg’s Directorial Team:
· Unit Production Manager: Susan McNamara
· First Assistant Director: Adam Somner
· Second Assistant Director: Ian Stone
· Second Second Assistant Directors: Eric Lasko, Trevor Tavares
This is Mr. Spielberg’s eleventh DGA Feature Film Award nomination. He won the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film three times for Saving Private Ryan (1998), Schindler’s List (1993) and The Color Purple (1985). He was also nominated in this category for Munich (2005), Amistad (1997), Empire of the Sun (1987), E.T.: The Extra Terrestrial (1982), Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) and Jaws (1975). Mr. Spielberg was honored with the DGA’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2000.

 

— article taken from deadline.com

_The_Writers_Guild_of_America_Awards

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

Flight, Written by John Gatins; Paramount Pictures

Looper, Written by Rian Johnson; TriStar Pictures

The Master, Written by Paul Thomas Anderson; The Weinstein Company

Moonrise Kingdom, Written by Wes Anderson & Roman Coppola; Focus Features

Zero Dark Thirty, Written by Mark Boal; Columbia Pictures

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

Argo, Screenplay by Chris Terrio; Based on a selection from The Master of Disguise by Antonio J. Mendez and the Wired Magazine article “The Great Escape” by Joshuah Bearman; Warner Bros. Pictures

Life of Pi, Screenplay by David Magee; Based on the novel by Yann Martel; 20th Century Fox

Lincoln, Screenplay by Tony Kushner; Based in part on the book Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln by Doris Kearns Goodwin; DreamWorks Pictures

The Perks of Being a Wallflower, Screenplay by Stephen Chbosky; Based on his book; Summit Entertainment

Silver Linings Playbook, Screenplay by David O. Russell; Based on the novel by Matthew Quick; The Weinstein Company

DOCUMENTARY SCREENPLAY

The Central Park Five, Written by Sarah Burns and David McMahon and Ken Burns; Sundance Selects

The Invisible War, Written by Kirby Dick; Cinedigm Entertainment Group

Mea Maxima Culpa: Silence in the House of God, Written by Alex Gibney; HBO Documentary Films

Searching for Sugar Man, Written by Malik Bendjelloul; Sony Pictures Classics

We Are Legion: The Story of the Hacktivists, Written byBrian Knappenberger; Cinetic Media

West of Memphis, Written by Amy Berg & Billy McMillin; Sony Pictures Classics

TELEVISION NOMINEES

DRAMA SERIES

Boardwalk Empire, Written by Dave Flebotte, Diane Frolov, Chris Haddock, Rolin Jones, Howard Korder, Steve Kornacki, Andrew Schneider, David Stenn, Terence Winter; HBO

Breaking Bad, Written by Sam Catlin, Vince Gilligan, Peter Gould, Gennifer Hutchison, George Mastras, Thomas Schnauz, Moira Walley-Beckett; AMC

Game of Thrones, Written by David Benioff, Bryan Cogman, George R. R. Martin, Vanessa Taylor, D.B. Weiss; HBO

Homeland, Written by Henry Bromell, Alexander Cary, Alex Gansa, Howard Gordon, Chip Johannessen, Meredith Stiehm; Showtime

Mad Men, Written by Lisa Albert, Semi Chellas, Jonathan Igla, Andre Jacquemetton, Maria Jacquemetton, Brett Johnson, Janet Leahy, Victor Levin, Erin Levy, Frank Pierson, Michael Saltzman, Matthew Weiner; AMC

COMEDY SERIES

30 Rock, Written by Jack Burditt, Kay Cannon, Robert Carlock, Tom Ceraulo, Vali Chandrasekaran, Luke Del Tredici, Tina Fey, Lauren Gurganous, Matt Hubbard, Colleen McGuinness, Sam Means, Dylan Morgan, Nina Pedrad, John Riggi, Josh Siegel, Ron Weiner, Tracey Wigfield; NBC

Girls, Written by Judd Apatow, Lesley Arfin, Lena Dunham, Sarah Heyward, Bruce Eric Kaplan, Jenni Konner, Deborah Schoeneman, Dan Sterling; HBO

Louie, Written by Pamela Adlon, Vernon Chatman, Louis C.K.; FX

Modern Family, Written by Cindy Chupack, Paul Corrigan, Abraham Higginbotham, Ben Karlin, Elaine Ko, Steven Levitan, Christopher Lloyd, Dan O’Shannon, Jeffrey Richman, Audra Sielaff, Brad Walsh, Bill Wrubel, Danny Zuker; ABC

Parks and Recreation, Written by Megan Amram, Greg Daniels, Nate Dimeo, Katie Dippold, Daniel J. Goor, Norm Hiscock, Dave King, Greg Levine, Joe Mande, Aisha Muharrar, Nick Offerman, Chelsea Peretti, Amy Poehler, Alexandra Rushfield, Mike Scully, Michael Schur, Harris Wittels, Alan Yang; NBC

NEW SERIES

Girls, Written by Judd Apatow, Lesley Arfin, Lena Dunham, Sarah Heyward, Bruce Eric Kaplan, Jenni Konner, Deborah Schoeneman, Dan Sterling; HBO

The Mindy Project, Written by Ike Barinholtz, Jeremy Bronson, Linwood Boomer, Adam Countee, Harper Dill, Mindy Kaling, Chris McKenna, B.J. Novak, David Stassen, Matt Warburton; Fox

Nashville, Written by Wendy Calhoun, Jason George, David Gould, David Marshall Grant, Dee Johnson, Todd Ellis Kessler, Callie Khouri, Meredith Lavender, Nancy Miller, James Parriott, Liz Tigelaar, Marcie Ulin; ABC

The Newsroom, Written by Brendan Fehily, David Handelman, Cinque Henderson, Paul Redford, Ian Reichbach, Amy Rice, Aaron Sorkin, Gideon Yago; HBO

Veep, Written by Jesse Armstrong, Simon Blackwell, Roger Drew, Sean Gray, Armando Iannucci, Ian Martin, Tony Roche, Will Smith; HBO

EPISODIC DRAMA

“Buyout” (Breaking Bad), Written by Gennifer Hutchison; AMC

“Dead Freight” (Breaking Bad), Written by George Mastras; AMC

“Fifty-One” (Breaking Bad), Written by Sam Catlin; AMC

“New Car Smell” (Homeland), Written by Meredith Stiehm; Showtime

“The Other Woman” (Mad Men), Written by Semi Chellasand Matthew Weiner; AMC

“Say My Name” (Breaking Bad), Written by Thomas Schnauz; AMC

EPISODIC COMEDY

“The Debate” (Parks and Recreation), Written by Amy Poehler; NBC

“Episode 9” (Episodes), Written by David Crane & Jeffrey Klarik; Showtime

“Leap Day” (30 Rock), Written by Luke Del Tredici; NBC

“Little Bo Bleep” (Modern Family), Written by Cindy Chupack; ABC

“Mistery Date” (Modern Family), Written by Jeffrey Richman; ABC

“Virgin Territory” (Modern Family), Written by Elaine Ko; ABC

LONG FORM – ORIGINAL

Hatfields & McCoys, Nights Two and Three, Teleplay byTed Mann and Ronald Parker, Story by Bill Kerby andTed Mann; History Channel

Hemingway & Gellhorn, Written by Jerry Stahl andBarbara Turner; HBO

“Pilot” (Political Animals), Written by Greg Berlanti; USA

LONG FORM – ADAPTED

Coma, Nights 1 and 2, Teleplay by John McLaughlin, Based on the book by Robin Cook; A&E

Game Change, Written by Danny Strong, Based on the book by Mark Halperin and John Heilemann; HBO

ANIMATION

“A Farewell to Arms” (Futurama), Written by Josh Weinstein; Comedy Central

“Forget-Me-Not” (Family Guy), Written by David A. Goodman; Fox

“Holidays of Future Passed” (The Simpsons), Written byJ. Stewart Burns; Fox

“Ned ‘N Edna’s Blend Agenda” (The Simpsons), Written by Jeff Westbrook; Fox

“Treehouse of Horror XXIII” (The Simpsons), Written byDavid Mandel & Brian Kelley; Fox

COMEDY / VARIETY (INCLUDING TALK) – SERIES

The Colbert Report, Writers: Michael Brumm, Stephen Colbert, Rich Dahm, Paul Dinello, Eric Drysdale, Rob Dubbin, Glenn Eichler, Dan Guterman, Peter Gwinn, Barry Julien, Jay Katsir, Frank Lesser, Opus Moreschi, Tom Purcell, Meredith Scardino, Scott Sherman, Max Werner; Comedy Central

Conan, Writers: Jose Arroyo, Andres du Bouchet, Deon Cole, Josh Comers, Dan Cronin, Michael Gordon, Brian Kiley, Laurie Kilmartin, Rob Kutner, Todd Levin, Brian McCann, Conan O’Brien, Matt O’Brien, Jesse Popp, Andy Richter, Brian Stack, Mike Sweeney; TBS

The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, Writers: Rory Albanese, Kevin Bleyer, Richard Blomquist, Steve Bodow, Tim Carvell, Hallie Haglund, J.R. Havlan, Elliott Kalan, Dan McCoy, Jo Miller, John Oliver, Zhubin Parang, Daniel Radosh, Jason Ross, Lauren Sarver, Jon Stewart; Comedy Central

Jimmy Kimmel Live, Writers: Tony Barbieri, Jonathan Bines, Joelle Boucai, Sal Iacono, Eric Immerman, Gary Greenberg, Josh Halloway, Bess Kalb, Jimmy Kimmel, Jeff Loveness, Molly McNearney, Bryan Paulk, Danny Ricker, Rick Rosner; ABC

Key & Peele, Writers: Jay Martel, Ian Roberts, Keegan-Michael Key, Jordan Peele, Sean Conroy, Colton Dunn, Charlie Sanders, Alex Rubens, Rebecca Drysdale; Comedy Central

Portlandia, Writers: Fred Armisen, Carrie Brownstein, Karey Dornetto, Jonathan Krisel, Bill Oakley; IFC

Real Time with Bill Maher, Writers: Scott Carter, Adam Felber, Matt Gunn, Brian Jacobsmeyer, Jay Jaroch, Chris Kelly, Mike Larsen, Bill Maher, Billy Martin; HBO

Saturday Night Live, Head Writer: Seth Meyers, Writers:James Anderson, Alex Baze, Neil Casey, Jessica Conrad, James Downey, Shelly Gossman, Steve Higgins, Colin Jost, Zach Kanin, Chris Kelly, Joe Kelly, Erik Kenward, Rob Klein, Lorne Michaels, John Mulaney, Christine Nangle, Mike O’Brien, Josh Patten, Paula Pell, Marika Sawyer, Sarah Schneider, Pete Schultz, John Solomon, Kent Sublette, Bryan Tucker, Additional Sketch By Emily Spivey, Jorma Taccone, Additional Material By Frank Sebastiano; NBC Universal

COMEDY / VARIETY – MUSIC, AWARDS, TRIBUTES – SPECIALS

66th Annual Tony Awards, Written by Dave Boone; Special Material by Paul Greenberg; Opening and Closing Songs by David Javerbaum, Adam Schlesinger; CBS

2012 Film Independent Spirit Awards, Written by Billy Kimball, Wayne Federman; IFC

After the Academy Awards, Head Writers: Gary Greenberg, Molly McNearney; Writers: Tony Barbieri, Jonathan Bines, Sal Iacono, Eric Immerman, Jimmy Kimmel, Jeffrey Loveness, Bryan Paulk, Danny Ricker, Richard G. Rosner; ABC

National Memorial Day Concert, Written by Joan Meyerson; PBS

DAYTIME DRAMA

Days of Our Lives, Written by Lorraine Broderick, Carolyn Culliton, Richard Culliton, Rick Draughon, Christopher Dunn, Lacey Dyer, Janet Iacobuzio, David A. Levinson, Ryan Quan, Dave Ryan, Melissa Salmons, Roger Schroeder, Elizabeth Snyder, Christopher J. Whitesell, Nancy Williams Watt; NBC

One Life to Live, Written by Lorraine Broderick, Ron Carlivati, Anna Theresa Cascio, Daniel J. O’Connor, Elizabeth Page, Jean Passanante, Melissa Salmons, Katherine Schock, Scott Sickles, Courtney Simon, Chris Van Etten; ABC

The Young and the Restless, Written by Amanda Beall, Jeff Beldner, Susan Dansby, Janice Ferri Esser, Jay Gibson, Scott Hamner, Marla Kanelos, Natalie Minardi Slater, Beth Milstein, Michael Montgomery, Anne Schoettle, Linda Schreiber, Sarah K. Smith, Christopher J. Whitesell, Teresa Zimmerman; CBS

CHILDREN’S – EPISODIC & SPECIALS

“The Good Sport” (Sesame Street); Written by Christine Ferraro; PBS

CHILDREN’S – LONG FORM OR SPECIAL

“Girl vs. Monster,” Story by Annie DeYoung; Teleplay byAnnie DeYoung and Ron McGee; Disney Channel

DOCUMENTARY – CURRENT EVENTS

“The Anthrax Files” (Frontline), Written by Michael Kirk; PBS

“A Perfect Terrorist” (Frontline); Written by Thomas Jennings; PBS

“Lost in Detention” (Frontline), Written by Rick Young; PBS

“Money, Power and Wall Street: Episode One” (Frontline), Written by Martin Smith and Marcela Gaviria; PBS

“Money, Power and Wall Street: Episode Three” (Frontline), Written by Michael Kirk & Mike Wiser; PBS

“Money, Power and Wall Street: Episode Four” (Frontline), Written by Marcela Gaviria and Martin Smith; PBS

DOCUMENTARY – OTHER THAN CURRENT EVENTS

“The Amish” (American Experience), Written by David Belton; PBS

“Clinton” (American Experience), Written by Barak Goodman; PBS

“Death and the Civil War” (American Experience), Written by Ric Burns; PBS

“The Fabric of the Cosmos: The Illusion of Time” (Nova), Telescript by Randall MacLowry, Story by Joseph McMaster and Randall MacLowry; PBS

“The Fabric of the Cosmos: Quantum Leap” (Nova), Telescript by Josh Rosen and Julia Cort, Story byJoseph McMaster and Josh Rosen; PBS

“Johnny Carson: King of Late Night” (American Masters), Written by Peter T. Jones; PBS

NEWS – REGULARLY SCHEDULED, BULLETIN, OR BREAKING REPORT

“Tragedy In Colorado: The Movie Theatre Massacre,” Written by Lisa Ferri, Joel Siegel; ABC News

NEWS – ANALYSIS, FEATURE, OR COMMENTARY

“The Ghost of Joe McCarthy” (Moyers & Company), Written by Bill Moyers, Michael Winship; Thirteen/ WNET

“Making History at Ole Miss,” Written by Polly Leider; CBS News

“The Regime Responds” (Frontline), Written by Marcela Gaviria; PBS

“Stem Cell Fraud” (60 Minutes), Written by Scott Pelley, Michael Rey and Oriana Zill de Granados, CBS News

RADIO NOMINEES

NEWS – REGULARLY SCHEDULED OR BREAKING REPORT

“CBS Radio News,” Written by Duane Tollison; CBS Radio News

“Local and National News,” Written by Mark Hugh Miller; CBS Radio News

“Remembering Andy Williams,” Written by Arlene Lebe; CBS Radio News

“World News This Year 2011,” Written by Darren Reynolds; ABC News Radio

NEWS – ANALYSIS, FEATURE OR COMMENTARY

“Dishin Digital,” Written by Robert Hawley; WCBS-AM

“Pre-existing Conditions and the Affordable Care Act,” Written by Scott J. Saloway; CBS Radio News

“Tributes,” Written by Gail Lee, CBS Radio News

PROMOTIONAL WRITING AND GRAPHIC ANIMATION NOMINEES

ON-AIR PROMOTION (RADIO OR TELEVISION)

“Partners”, Written by Dan A. Greenberger; CBS

TELEVISION GRAPHIC ANIMATION

“CBS News Animations,” Animation by David Rosen; CBS News

“The Oscars” (Sunday Morning with Charles Osgood), Animation by Bob Pook; CBS

(*Editor Note: There were no nominees in the Documentary – Radio category this year.)

taken from wga.org

Box Office Results: The Hobbit Sets New December Opening Weekend Record

the hobbit

The ComingSoon.net Box Office Report has been updated with studio estimates for the weekend. Clickhere for the full box office estimates of the top 12 films and then check back on Monday for the final figures based on actual box office.

New Line Cinema and MGM’s The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey kicked off the holiday season with an estimated $84.8 million, a new December opening weekend record, surpassing the $77.2 million earned by Will Smith-starrer I Am Legend the same weekend in 2007. The Peter Jackson film debuted in 4,045 theaters in which it averaged a strong $20,958 per location.

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey received an A CinemaScore from moviegoers which should help with word-of-mouth through the holidays. 58% of the audience was over the ages of 25 and males made up 57% of the audience.

$10.1 million of the domestic total came from the 326 IMAX theaters the film opened in this weekend. That’s an average of $31,000 per screen. Internationally, the picture broke an IMAX December record grossing $5 million in 126 IMAX locations (an average of $40,000). The IMAX locations which showed the film in 48 fps were quite strong, generating $44,000 per screen domestically and $57,000 per screen internationally. IMAX’s global weekend total for “The Hobbit” is an estimated $15+ million, which is a record for December.

In North America, DreamWorks Animation’s Rise of the Guardians remained in second place with $7.4 million for a four-week total of $71.4 million. The animated family adventure cost about $145 million to make.

DreamWorks Pictures‘ Lincoln climbed a spot to third with $7.2 million. The $65 million Steven Spielberg film has earned $107.9 million after six weeks in theaters.

Dropping from first place to fourth, Sony and MGM’s Skyfall added $7 million domestically for a total of $272.4 million after six weeks. Internationally, the 23rd James Bond film grossed an estimated $12.2 million this weekend, bringing the overseas total to $678.7 million. Worldwide, the film has earned $951 million to date.

Ang Lee’s Life of Pi rounded out the top five with $5.4 million its fourth weekend. The Twentieth Century Fox Film release has collected $69.6 million after four weeks.

Also, Summit’s The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 2 earned $45.2 million its fifth weekend for a domestic total of $276.9 million.

Weekend Box Office

December 14, 2012 – December 16, 2012 

TW LW Title Studio Weekend Theaters Total Week
1 The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey New Line Cinema (Warner Bros. Pictures)
$84,775,000
4,045
$84,775,000
1
2 2 Rise of the Guardians DreamWorks Animation
$7,420,000
3,387
$71,362,000
4
3 4 Lincoln DreamWorks Pictures
$7,244,000
2,285
$107,898,000
6
4 1 Skyfall Columbia Pictures (Sony), MGM
$7,000,000
2,924
$272,366,000
6
5 5 Life of Pi 20th Century Fox
$5,400,000
2,548
$69,559,000
4
6 3 The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 2 Summit Entertainment
$5,175,000
3,042
$276,865,000
5
7 7 Wreck-It Ralph Walt Disney Pictures
$3,273,000
2,249
$168,779,000
7
8 6 Playing for Keeps FilmDistrict
$3,247,000
2,840
$10,838,000
2
9 8 Red Dawn FilmDistrict
$2,394,000
2,250
$40,889,000
4
10 11 Silver Linings Playbook The Weinstein Company
$2,084,000
371
$16,954,000
5
11 9 Flight Paramount Pictures
$1,940,000
1,823
$89,448,000
7
12 Argo Warner Bros. Pictures
$1,145,000
667
$104,930,000
10

 

Source: comingsoon.net

 

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey’ 48 FPS 3D – Good or Bad?

The-Hobbit-Unexpected-Journey-HFR-Poster

Most critics have weighed in with their thoughts about director Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (read our review), with the reactions varying accordingly. However, the most commonly-derided aspect is the film’s appearance when projected in its native format: 48 frames per second (fps) 3D, which is twice the standard for theater showings. The issue has hounded An Unexpected Journeysince Jackson premiered footage in 48 fps at CinemaCon 2012; lately, he seems to be spending more time discussing the format (or, rather, defending it) than other film elements, thematic and technical alike.

Warner Bros. is noticeably concerned about blowback, as evidenced by the limited rollout and lack of surcharge for 48 fps Hobbit screenings. Jackson is ready to embrace it as a new storytelling tool but for studios, the jury’s still out on whether 48 fps is the next ‘big thing’ (see: 3D and/or IMAX) or the latest in a line of failed attempts to shake up the viewing experience (Smell-o-vision, anyone?) – and by that we mean, something that audiences will pay for.

What the higher frame-rate does is remove that thin layer of graininess that allows viewers to distinguish between images projected on a theater screen (something artificial) and their surroundings in the real world, purely on the basis of sight. This results in camera and actors’ movements onscreen appearing faster than normal; not to mention, it makes it all the more obvious when practical effects (be it sets, props, makeup or costumes) and CGI have been manufactured on the cheap.

HD televisions and Blu-rays have a similar impact, revealing the imperfections and flaws in older titles (and newer ones, at that) which were previously masked by the haziness afforded from lower frame-rate projections. Similarly, motion onscreen in general is often perceived as sped-up and therefore blurrier, simply because so many longtime viewers are accustomed to the ‘slowdown’ effect of the traditional 24 frame-rate screening (going back to the early 20th century, that is).

the hobbit-unexpected-journey-reviews

An Unexpected Journey, by comparison, doesn’t suffer so much from those issuesbecause Jackson and his collaborators took added transparency into consideration while shooting at 48 fps; hence, viewers are actually meant to be able to see the finer details. As a result, the fine craftsmanship of film artists who work with their hands, basic machinery or state-of-the-art computers is easier to appreciate; not to mention, scenes where human and CGI players interact seem more believable (as both now look equally “real”).

Of course, this presents a philosophical dilemma: Should these things look “real?” Middle-earth, as presented in The Hobbit, is the sort of fairytale kingdom that one might conjure up from their imagination (as J.R.R. Tolkien did so many years ago). When you reduce artificiality and instill a heightened sense of realism, it dwindles the sensation of peering into a dreamworld; worse, it leaves some people with the same (bad) impression as a low-budget recording of a stage performance. That’s why some have dismissed Jackson’s Hobbit ’experiment’ as misguided at best, a gimmick with little artistic merit at worst.

the hobbit bilbo-rivendell-hobbit-trailer-570x244

Andrew Lesnie’s cinematography throughout An Unexpected Journey uses 3D to its advantage, combing subtle (but constant) camera motion with sweeping crane and aerial shots to generate an immersive visual design. Moreover, when viewed with the 48 fps format, the grandiose shots of environments both real (the New Zealand landscape) and fake (tunnels and mines in the Lonely Mountain) end up bearing a stronger resemblance to a model; that holds true for the individuals that populate them, be they computer-generated or genuine.

Again, this quality can be a distraction and jarring for those not prepared. However, it (arguably) allows cinematic visuals to better imitate what the real world looks like to the human eye, when perceived from either a great height or up close. This also makes the 3D viewing experience smoother and less cumbersome (ie. higher fps = fewer headaches). Moreover, it seems to reduce the frequency of 3D images that take on a pop-up book appearance and benefits certain camera techniques (like changing the depth of field). Indeed, that makes 3D and 48 fps a natural fit.

The-Hobbit-Third-Film-New-Title-and-Release-Date

Jackson’s intention with these technical choices is quite apparent: the more real various components of Middle-earth look, the more moviegoers will feel as though they’ve been transported there (in theory). It’s not meant to distract from key storytelling elements (narrative structure, pacing); rather, it’s meant to enhance. Whether or not it inadvertently ends up serving the former rather that latter and intended purpose, is the basis for continuing debates about the subject.

Interestingly enough, the 48 fps format might be best-suited for films that aren’t reliant on heavy amounts of digital shots or big-budget panache; that is, smaller projects aiming for something closer to cinéma vérité would benefit more from the crystal-clear visual presentation. On the other hand (as mentioned before), that format does reduce physical stress from 3D viewing and helps to seamlessly blend practical/CGI components. Its storytelling value is flexible, depending on what the director is going for (similar to the partial use of IMAX in such films as The Dark Knight Rises).

the hobbit

Jackson perhaps put it best himself when he clarified that increased frame-rate projection is not meant to be an industry game-changer (a la color, sound, 3D). To quote:

“The big thing to realize is that it’s not an attempt to change the film industry. It’s another choice. The projectors that can run at 48 frames can run at 24 frames – it doesn’t have to be one thing or another. You can shoot a movie at 24 frames and have sequences at 48 or 60 frames within the body of the film. You can still do all the shutter-angle and strobing effects. It doesn’t necessarily change how films are going to be made. It’s just another choice that filmmakers have got and for me, it gives that sense of reality that I love in cinema.”

(reviewed by sandy schaefer. images taken from screenrant.com)

 

Hollywood Foreign Press Association, 2013 Golden Globes Announcement

1.    BEST MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

a.    ARGO
Warner Bros. Pictures, GK Films, Smokehouse Pictures; Warner Bros. Pictures

b.    DJANGO UNCHAINED
The Weinstein Company, Columbia Pictures; The Weinstein Company/Sony Pictures Releasing

c.    LIFE OF PI
Fox 2000 Pictures; Twentieth Century Fox

d.    LINCOLN
DreamWorks Pictures, Twentieth Century Fox; Touchstone Pictures

e.    ZERO DARK THIRTY
Columbia Pictures and Annapurna Pictures; Sony Pictures Releasing

2.    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

a.    Jessica Chastain     ZERO DARK THIRTY

b.    Marion Cotillard    RUST AND BONE

c.    Helen Mirren    HITCHCOCK

d.    NAOMI WATTS     THE IMPOSSIBLE

e.    Rachel Weisz     THE DEEP BLUE SEA

3. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

a.    Daniel Day-Lewis     LINCOLN

b.    Richard Gere         ARBITRAGE

c.    JOHN HAWKES         THE SESSIONS

d.    Joaquin Phoenix     THE MASTER

e.    Denzel Washington FLIGHT

4.    BEST MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL
Blueprint Pictures/Participant Media; Fox Searchlight Pictures

b.    LES MISERABLES
Universal Pictures, A Working Title Films/Cameron Mackintosh Productions; Universal Pictures

c.    MOONRISE KINGDOM
Indian Paintbrush; Focus Features

d.    SALMON FISH IN GIN THE YEMEN
CBS Films; CBS Films

e.    SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK
The Weinstein Company; The Weinstein Company

5.    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    Emily Blunt         SALMON FISHING IN THE YEMEN

b.    Judi Dench             THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL

c.    Jennifer Lawrence  SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK

d.    Maggie Smith         QUARTET

e.    Meryl Streep         HOPE SPRINGS

6. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    Jack Black             BERNIE

b.    BRADLEY COOPER     SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK

c.    Hugh Jackman         LES MISERABLES

d.    Ewan McGregor     SALMON FISHING IN THE YEMEN

e.    Bill Murray         HYDE PARK ON HUDSON

7.    BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

a.    BRAVE
Walt Disney Pictures, Pixar Animation Studios; Walt Disney Pictures

b.    FRANKENWEENIE
Walt Disney Pictures; Walt Disney Pictures

c.    HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA
Columbia Pictures / Sony Pictures Animation; Sony Pictures Releasing

d.    RISE OF THE GUARDIANS
DreamWorks Animation LLC; Paramount Pictures

e.    WRECK-IT RALPH
Walt Disney Pictures, Walt Disney Animation Studios; Walt Disney Pictures

8.    BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

a.    AMOUR (AUSTRIA)
Les Films Du Losange, X Filme Creative Pool, Wega Film; Sony Pictures Classics

b.    AROYALAFFAIR (DENMARK)
(En kongelig affære) 
Zentropa Entertainment; Magnolia Pictures

c.    THE INTOUCHABLES (FRANCE)
(Les Intouchables) 
The WeinstenCompany, Quad Productions, Gaumont, TF1 Films Production, Ten Films, Chaocorp; The Weinstein Company

d.    KON-TIKI (NORWAY/UK/DENMARK)
Nordisk Film Production, Recorded Picture Company; The Weinstein Company

e.    RUST AND BONE (FRANCE)
(De rouille et d’os) 
Page 114, Why Not Productions; Sony Pictures Classics

9. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

a.    Amy Adams             THE MASTER

b.    Sally Field             LINCOLN

c.    Anne Hathaway     LES MISERABLES

d.    Helen Hunt         THE SESSIONS

e.    Nicole Kidman         THE PAPERBOY

10. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

a.    Alan Arkin                 ARGO

b.    Leonardo DiCaprio         DJANGO UNCHAINED

c.    Philip Seymour Hoffman  THE MASTER

d.    Tommy Lee Jones          LINCOLN

e.    Christoph Waltz         DJANGO UNCHAINED

11. BEST DIRECTOR – MOTION PICTURE

a.    Ben Affleck             ARGO

b.    Kathryn Bigelow         ZERO DARK THIRTY

c.    Ang Lee                 LIFE OF PI

d.    Steven Spielberg         LINCOLN

e.    Quentin Tarantino         DJANGO UNCHAINED

12. BEST SCREENPLAY – MOTION PICTURE

a.    Mark Boal                 ZERO DARK THIRTY

b.    Tony Kushner             LINCOLN

c.    David O. Russell         SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK

d.    Quentin Tarantino         DJANGO UNCHAINED

e.    CHRIS TERRIO             ARGO

13. BEST ORIGINAL SCORE – MOTION PICTURE

a.    MYCHAEL DANNA         LIFE OF PI

b.    Alexandre Desplat     ARGO

c.    Dario Marianelli         ANNA KARENINA

d.    TOM TYKWER,            CLOUD ATLAS

e.     JOHNNY KLIMEK,

f.    REINHOLD HEIL

g.    John Williams             LINCOLN

14. BEST ORIGINAL SONG – MOTION PICTURE

a.    “FOR YOU” — ACT OF VALOR
Music by: Monty Powell, Keith Urban Lyrics by: Monty Powell, Keith Urban

b.    “NOT RUNNING ANYMORE”—STAND UP GUYS
Music by: Jon Bon Jovi Lyrics by: Jon Bon Jovi

c.    “SAFE & SOUND” — THE HUNGER GAMES
Music by: Taylor Swift, John Paul White, Joy Williams, T Bone Burnett Lyrics by: Taylor Swift, John Paul White, Joy Williams, T Bone Burnett

d.    “SKYFALL”—SKYFALL
Music by: Adele, Paul Epworth Lyrics by: Adele, Paul Epworth

e.    “SUDDENLY” — LES MISERABLES
Music by: Claude-Michel Schonberg
Lyrics by: Alain Boublil, Claude-Michel Schonberg

15. BEST TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

a.    BREAKING BAD
AMC 
Sony Pictures Television

b.    BOARDWALK EMPIRE
HBO 
Leverage, Closest to the Hole Productions, Sikelia Productions and Cold Front Productions in association with HBO Entertainment

c.    DOWNTON ABBEY: SEASON 2
PBS 
A Carnival / Masterpiece Co-Production

d.    HOMELAND
SHOWTIME 
SHOWTIME, Teakwood Lane Productions, Cherry Pie Productions, Keshet, Fox 21

e.    THE NEWSROOM
HBO 
HBO Entertainment

16. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

a.    CONNIE BRITTON                 NASHVILLE

b.    Glenn Close                 DAMAGES

c.    Claire Danes                 HOMELAND

d.    MICHELLE DOCKERY             DOWNTON ABBEY: SEASON 2

e.    Julianna Margulies          THE GOOD WIFE

17. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

a.    Steve Buscemi                 BOARDWALK EMPIRE

b.    Bryan Cranston              BREAKING BAD

c.    Jeff Daniels                 THE NEWSROOM

d.    Jon Hamm                      MAD MEN

e.    Damian Lewis                 HOMELAND

18. BEST TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    THE BIG BANG THEORY
CBS 
Chuck Lorre Productions, Inc. in association with Warner Bros. Television

b.    EPISODES
SHOWTIME 
SHOWTIME, Hat Trick Productions, Crane Klarik Productions

c.    GIRLS
HBO 
Apatow Productions and I am Jenni Konner Productions in association with HBO Entertainment

d.    MODERN FAMILY
ABC 
Levitan-Lloyd Productions in association with Twentieth Century Fox Television

e.    SMASH
NBC

19. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    ZOOEY DESCHANEL                     NEW GIRL

b.    Julia Louis-Dreyfus                 VEEP

c.    LENA DUNHAM                         GIRLS

d.    Tina Fey                                 30 ROCK

e.    Amy Poehler                         PARKS AND RECREATION

20. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    Alec Baldwin                         30 ROCK

b.    Don Cheadle                         HOUSE OF LIES

c.    LOUIS C.K.                             LOUIE

d.    Matt LeBlanc                         EPISODES

e.    Jim Parsons                             THE BIG BANG THEORY

21. BEST MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

a.    GAME CHANGE
HBO 
Playtone and Everyman Pictures in association with HBO Films

b.    THE GIRL
HBO 
A Wall to Wall, Warner Bros Entertainment GmbH, Moonlighting and BBC Production in association with HBO Films

c. HATFIELDS & MCCOYS 
HISTORY Thinkfactory Media in association with History

d.    THE HOUR
BBC AMERICA 
Kudos Film and Television/BBC America co-production

e.    POLITICAL ANIMALS
USA NETWORK Berlanti Productions and Laurence Mark Productions in association with Warner Horizon Television

22. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

a.    Nicole Kidman                     HEMINGWAY & GELLHORN

b.    Jessica Lange                     AMERICAN HORROR STORY: ASYLUM

c.    SIENNA MILLER                     THE GIRL

d.    Julianne Moore                 GAME CHANGE

e.    Sigourney Weaver                  POLITICAL ANIMALS

23. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

a.    Kevin Costner                     HATFIELDS & MCCOYS

b.    BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH              SHERLOCK (MASTERPIECE)

c.    Woody Harrelson                 GAME CHANGE

d.    TOBY JONES                         THE GIRL

e.    Clive Owen                         HEMINGWAY & GELLHORN

24. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

a.    HAYDEN PANETTIERE                 NASHVILLE

b.    ARCHIE PANJABI                     THE GOOD WIFE

c.    Sarah Paulson                     GAME CHANGE

d.    Maggie Smith                     DOWNTON ABBEY: SEASON 2

e.    Sofia Vergara                      MODERN FAMILY

25. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

a.    MAX GREENFIELD                 NEW GIRL

b.    Ed Harris                         GAME CHANGE

c.    DANNY HUSTON                     MAGIC CITY

d.    Mandy Patinkin                 HOMELAND

e.    Eric Stonestreet                 MODERN FAMILY

 

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