Tag Archive: Steven Spielberg


Tarantino’s favorite films

Sight and Sound asked filmmakers to list their favorite films of all-time. Take a look at Quentin Tarantino’s top picks and then take our poll below.

Apocalypse Now (1976) – Francis Ford Coppola
The Bad News Bears (1976) – Michael Ritchie
Carrie (1976) – Brian De Palma
Dazed and Confused (1993) – Richard Linklater
The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (1966) – Sergio Leone
The Great Escape (1963) – John Sturges
His Girl Friday (1939) – Howard Hawks
Jaws (1975) – Steven Spielberg
Pretty Maids All in a Row (1971) – Roger Vadium
Rolling Thunder (1977) – John Flynn
Sorcerer (1977) – William Friedkin
Taxi Driver (1976) – Martin Scorsese

Read more about Tarantino here: http://bit.ly/Xk0rr4

 

From the outside, it looked like Steven Spielberg’s political biopic would walk the Oscars, but canny campaigning saw Ben Affleck‘s Iran-hostage drama pip it at the post. Here’s how they did it

Argo and Lincoln

Head to head … Argo and Lincoln

Argo‘s yo-yo awards season ended on an upswing on Sunday as the Tehran yarn clinched the Big Kahuna of movie honours. Ben Affleck‘s third outing as director endured the proverbial rollercoaster ride over the past five months and the Warner Bros crowd will be partying late into the night after winning best picture. This was the first time since Driving Miss Daisy in 1989 that the prize had gone to a movie whose director had not been nominated for an Oscar.

  1. Argo
  2. Production year: 2012
  3. Country: USA
  4. Cert (UK): 15
  5. Runtime: 120 mins
  6. Directors: Ben Affleck
  7. Cast: Alan Arkin, Ben Affleck, Bryan Cranston, Christopher Denham, Clea DuVall, John Goodman, Kerry Bishe, Rory Cochrane, Scoot McNairy, Tate Donovan, Victor Garber
  8. More on this film

The popular narrative of what has been an unusually high-calibre awards season is that Argo – the people’s favourite – snuck in at the eleventh hour to swipe the best picture prize from Lincoln. Not so. Argo never lost its high standing among voters and maintained its campaign momentum – albeit in a more nuanced manner in recent weeks – despite the mighty efforts of the publicity machine behind Steven Spielberg‘s august history lesson.

The campaign machine was chugging along nicely and then on 8 October, four days before Argo was due to open in US cinemas, Lincoln premiered at the New York film festival. Spielberg was about to throw a spanner in the works. Suddenly Argo was no longer the name on everyone’s lips. Lincoln was being hailed in some quarters as a masterpiece, perhaps Spielberg’s best since Schindler’s List. Hollywood lined up to kneel before the altar of Daniel Day-Lewis. An air of invincibility coalesced around Lincoln as the first awards groups prepared to announce their winners.

Day-Lewis as Abraham Lincoln was a match made in prestige movie heaven and the Anglo-Irish actor dominated his category, earning accolades from just about every awards group including the influential Screen Actors Guild, the largest voting block in the Academy. He duly won his third lead actor Oscar on Sunday and became the first man to do so. Spielberg did not make it on to the winners’ podium and, in a rare surprise on the night, had to watch as Ang Lee won best director for Life of Pi.

Read more here: http://bit.ly/XvUPak

By the start of the year Lincoln had garnered the most Golden Globe and Oscar nominations and was the perceived frontrunner. This suited the Argo camp, which wanted their contender to be the marginal underdog. At the Golden Globes in January, Lincoln suffered its first public reversal as Argo prevailed in the best dramatic picture contest and Affleck beat Spielberg in the directing category.

Two weeks later, over the course of one heady weekend, Argo delivered a one-two punch to land best picture at the Producers Guild of America and best ensemble cast at the Screen Actors Guild. On 3 February Affleck became only the third person to win the DGA award without an Oscar nomination. Two weeks later Chris Terrio won the WGA’s adapted screenplay honour. The votes for successive shows had already been cast. The late cascade of prizes may have seemed like people were suddenly championing Argo, but in reality the movie’s enduring pedigree never wavered and Hollywood had made up its mind.

 

  • Directing

    A government official in the director’s native Taiwan praises his accomplishment, while Indian stars tweet in delight over Lee’s statement in Hindi during his acceptance speech.

HONG KONG and DELHI – Just hours after bagging an Oscar statuette in Los Angeles, Ang Lee has been told of yet another award coming his way: an honorary citizen’s medal from the municipal authorities of Taichuing, the Taiwanese city where he shot the ocean scenes in Life of Pi.

Speaking to the Taiwanese CNA news agency, Taichung mayor Jason Hu – who watched the awards ceremony after a medical check-up in a Taipei hospital – said Lee deserves the Best Director prize, and that he thanked Lee for putting the island on the map by shooting Life of Pi there and then giving Taiwan a call-out in his acceptance speech.

Hu said Lee, who was born in southern Taiwan and left the island to study filmmaking in the US in 1979, should be accorded with recognition by the Taiwanese government, and he will make the filmmaker an honorary citizen of Taichung.

Read more about Ang Lee here: http://bit.ly/VHDmuV

Life of Pi has proven to be a hit in Taiwan, where it took US$15.6 million. The film also took about US$85 million on mainland China, an amount which surpassed its American earnings of US$69.6 million.

Meanwhile, Lee set the Indian blogosphere alight by concluding his acceptance speech on Sunday night with a salutation in Hindi.

“YES!!! Life of Pi wins four Oscars, with most deserved Best Director Oscar for Ang Lee, who ended speech with ‘Namaste,’” actor Kabir Bedi posted on his twitter account.

“Congratulations to the entire team of Life Of Pi and to the Genius called Ang Lee. Proud to have worked with him.:),” said a tweet by actor Anupam Kher,who was at the Oscar ceremony as part of the ensemble cast of Silver Linings Playbook. Kher — who also posted a photo of himself with Lee taken at a pre-Oscar party — had earlier worked with the two-time Oscar winning director in 2007’sLust, Caution.

“Ohhhh how beautiful to see Ang Lee on the stage. He truly truly truly deserves it,” tweeted actorAdil Hussain who stars in Life of Pi, playing the principal character’s father.

Perhaps the tweet that best captured the enthusiasm of Lee’s Oscar win and acceptance speech came from Bollywood banner Balaji Telefilms CEO Tanuj Garg: “Every Indian has just had an orgasm over Ang Lee’s ‘namaste.’”

 

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Tomorrow night’s BAFTA Awards are the last televised stop on the awards calendar before the Oscars, and in a year where several key races remain unsettled, they’ll be watched even more eagerly than usual by awards pundits. (Well, “followed” if not “watched” — I, for one, won’t have access to the live broadcast of the show, annually shown on a quaint tape-delay system that suggests the BBC hasn’t quite got to grips yet with a little thing called the internet. But I digress.)

Like the Academy, the BAFTA voters lavished attention on an apparent frontrunner, only to undermine it by eliminating it from the Best Director race. The difference, of course, is that the British and American groups dealt this backhand to different films. Where the Oscars left Ben Affleck (as a director, at least) out of the party, the Brits decided Steven Spieberg could afford to sit this one out, despite handing “Lincoln” a field-leading 10 nominations. This truly is the season of mixed signals, as Guy Lod wrote for hitfix.com

In any event, BAFTA embraced “Argo” wholeheartedly, shocking onlookers by adding a Best Actor nod for Ben Affleck (his first and only individual acting mention of the season.) Though “Life of Pi” — a genuine box office story in the UK — seemed to be surging around the time of the nominations, I’ve a feeling BAFTA will follow the lead of the Globes and the Guilds by crowning Affleck’s tidy Hollywood thriller. Still, if Ang Lee manages to sneak past Ben Affleck tomorrow night to win his third Best Director BAFTA, this very unusual race could get even harder to read. With nine nominations and impressive local box office, “Life of Pi” feels due more than just a technical award or two, and could even be a spoiler in the Best Film race too.

Read more at http://bit.ly/WCe5Dp

The awards will be announced on Sunday 10 February at a ceremony hosted by Stephen Fry at the Royal Opera House, London.

Best Film

Argo – Grant Heslov, Ben Affleck, George Clooney
Les Misérables – Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Debra Hayward, Cameron Mackintosh
Life of Pi – Gil Netter, Ang Lee, David Womark
Lincoln – Steven Spielberg, Kathleen Kennedy
Zero Dark Thirty – Mark Boal, Kathryn Bigelow, Megan Ellison

Outstanding British Film

Anna Karenina – Joe Wright, Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Paul Webster, Tom Stoppard
The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel – John Madden, Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin, Ol Parker
Les Misérables – Tom Hooper, Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Debra Hayward, Cameron Mackintosh, William Nicholson, Alain Boublil, Claude-Michel Schönberg, Herbert Kretzmer
Seven Psychopaths – Martin McDonagh, Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin
Skyfall – Sam Mendes, Michael G. Wilson, Barbara Broccoli, Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, John Logan

Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer

Bart Layt (Director), Dimitri Doganis (Producer) – The Imposter
David Morris (Director), Jacqui Morris (Director/Producer) – McCullin Dexter Fletcher (Director/Writer), Danny King (Writer) – Wild Bill
James Bobin (Director) – The Muppets
Tina Gharavi (Director/Writer) – I Am Nasrine

Film Not in the English Language

Amour – Michael Haneke, Margaret Ménégoz
Headhunters – Morten Tyldum, Marianne Gray, Asle Vatn
The Hunt – Thomas Vinterberg, Sisse Graum Jørgensen, Morten Kaufmann
Rust and Bone – Jacques Audiard, Pascal Caucheteux
Untouchable – Eric Toledano, Olivier Nakache, Nicolas Duval Adassovsky, Yann Zenou, Laurent Zeitoun

Documentary

The Imposter – Bart Layton, Dimitri Doganis
Marley – Kevin Macdonald, Steve Bing, Charles Steel
McCullin – David Morris, Jacqui Morris
Searching for Sugar Man – Malik Bendjelloul, Simon Chinn
West of Memphis – Amy Berg

Animated Film

Brave – Mark Andrews, Brenda Chapman
Frankenweenie – Tim Burton
Paranorman – Sam Fell, Chris Butler

Director

Amour – Michael Haneke
Argo – Ben Affleck
Django Unchained – Quentin Tarantino
Life of Pi – Ang Lee
Zero Dark Thirty – Kathryn Bigelow

Original Screenplay

Amour – Michael Haneke
Django Unchained – Quentin Tarantino
The Master – Paul Thomas Anderson
Moonrise Kingdom – Wes Anderson, Roman Coppola
Zero Dark Thirty – Mark Boal

Adapted Screenplay

Argo – Chris Terrio
Beasts of the Southern Wild – Lucy Alibar, Benh Zeitlin
Life of Pi – David Magee
Lincoln – Tony Kushner
Silver Linings Playbook – David O. Russell

Leading Actor

Ben Affleck – Argo
Bradley Cooper – Silver Linings Playbook
Daniel Day-Lewis – Lincoln
Hugh Jackman – Les Misérables
Joaquin Phoenix –The Master

Leading Actress

Emmanuelle Riva – Amour
Helen Mirren – Hitchcock
Jennifer Lawrence – Silver Linings Playbook
Jessica Chastain – Zero Dark Thirty
Marion Cotillard – Rust and Bone

Supporting Actor

Alan Arkin – Argo
Christoph Waltz – Django Unchained
Javier Bardem – Skyfall
Philip Seymour Hoffman – The Master
Tommy Lee Jones – Lincoln

Supporting Actress

Amy Adams – The Master
Anne Hathaway – Les Misérables
Helen Hunt – The Sessions
Judi Dench – Skyfall
Sally Field – Lincoln

Original Music

Anna Karenina – Dario Marianelli
Argo – Alexandre Desplat
Life of Pi – Mychael Danna
Lincoln – John Williams
Skyfall – Thomas Newman

Cinematography

Anna Karenina – Seamus McGarvey
Les Misérables – Danny Cohen
Life of Pi – Claudio Miranda
Lincoln – Janusz Kaminski
Skyfall  – Roger Deakins

Editing

Argo – William Goldenberg
Django Unchained – Fred Raskin
Life of Pi – Tim Squyres
Skyfall – Stuart Baird
Zero Dark Thirty – Dylan Tichenor, William Goldenberg

Production Design

Anna Karenina – Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer
Les Misérables – Eve Stewart, Anna Lynch-Robinson
Life of Pi – David Gropman, Anna Pinnock
Lincoln – Rick Carter, Jim Erickson
Skyfall – Dennis Gassner, Anna Pinnock

Costume Design

Anna Karenina – Jacqueline Durran
Great Expectations – Beatrix Aruna Pasztor
Les Misérables – Paco Delgado
Lincoln – Joanna Johnston
Snow White and the Huntsman – Colleen Atwood

Make-up and Hair

Anna Karenina – Ivana Primorac
Hitchcock – Julie Hewett, Martin Samuel, Howard Berger
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey – Peter Swords King, Richard Taylor, Rick Findlater
Les Misérables – Lisa Westcott
Lincoln – Lois Burwell, Kay Georgiou

Sound

Django Unchained – Mark Ulano, Michael Minkler, Tony Lamberti, Wylie Stateman
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey – Tony Johnson, Christopher Boyes, Michael Hedges, Michael Semanick, Brent Burge, Chris Ward
Les Misérables – Simon Hayes, Andy Nelson, Mark Paterson, Jonathan Allen, Lee Walpole, John Warhurst
Life of Pi – Drew Kunin, Eugene Gearty, Philip Stockton, Ron Bartlett, D. M. Hemphill
Skyfall – Stuart Wilson, Scott Millan, Greg P. Russell, Per Hallberg, Karen Baker Landers

Special Visual Effects

The Dark Knight Rises – Paul Franklin, Chris Corbould, Peter Bebb, Andrew Lockley
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey – Joe Letteri, Eric Saindon, David Clayton, R. Christopher White
Life of Pi – Bill Westenhofer, Guillaume Rocheron, Erik-Jan De Boer
Marvel Avengers Assemble – Nominees TBC
Prometheus – Richard Stammers, Charley Henley, Trevor Wood, Paul Butterworth

Short Animation

Here to Fall – Kris Kelly, Evelyn McGrath
I’m Fine Thanks – Eamonn O’Neill
The Making of Longbird – Will Anderson, Ainslie Henderson

Short Film

The Curse – Fyzal Boulifa, Gavin Humphries
Good Night – Muriel d’Ansembourg, Eva Sigurdardottir
Swimmer – Lynne Ramsay, Peter Carlton, Diarmid Scrimshaw
Tumult – Johnny Barrington, Rhianna Andrews
The Voorman Problem – Mark Gill, Baldwin Li

The EE Rising Star Award (voted for by the public)

Elizabeth Olsen
Andrea Riseborough
Suraj Sharma
Juno Temple
Alicia Vikander

–taken from bfi.org.uk

Ben Affleck Accepts the DGA Award

Kevin Winter/Getty Images Entertainment

UPDATED: Lena Dunham is lauded for “Girls”; Rian Johnson of “Breaking Bad‘ and Jay Roach of “Game Change” are also honored.

The 65th annual Directors Guild of America Awards ceremony saw Ben Affleck continue his streak of taking home prizes for Argo. The 40-year-old actor turned director won the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Films at the awards dinner, which was held Saturday night at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland.

“I don’t think this makes ma a real director, but I think it means I’m on my way,” he said as he accepted the honor.

In the process, a new awards season statistic was created. The DGA Award usually points the way to the best director Oscar winner, since on only six occasions since the DGA Awards began in 1948 has the DGA winner failed to become the Academy’s best director winner. But that number now goes to seven, since Affleck isn’t nominated for a directing Oscar.

Argo is nominated for seven Academy Awards, though, and now becomes the odds-on favorite since in recent weeks its won two Globes, two Critics Choice Awards, the PGA Award and the SAG ensemble award.

In addition to Affleck, this year’s nominees for film wereKathryn Bigelow, nominated for Zero Dark ThirtyTom HooperLes MiserablesAng LeeLife of Pi; and Steven SpielbergLincoln.

As is the tradition at the DGA Awards, each of the feature film nominees were invited on stage during the course of the evening to accept a medallion.

Introducing Affleck, Bryan Cranston said his Argo director has earned right to be considered “one of our industry’s best.” And Affleck responded, “I look out and see all these great directors. I feel I should be auditioning.” Lee told his fellow directors that the recognition meant more to him than even his Oscar because “you know how hard it is to make movies.” Bigelow, who has come under attack in some quarter’s for her fiilm’s depictions of torture, used her time to underscore the importance of artistic freedom, saying, “None of us here could do what we do without having the freedom of artistic expression.”

Hooper was introduced by Les Mis stars Anne Hathaway and Hugh Jackman, who playfully testified to the director’s demands, with Jackman calling the director “batshit crazy.” Hooper, in turn, spoke of the lengths the two actors went to to become their characters — saying it too was a form of craziness — and then invited his entire directing team, who flew in from London, onstage to share the honor of the nomination.

Martin Short, invited to introduce Spielberg, provided some of the best jokes of the evening. “It’s more than a thrill, it’s an obligation,” he said of his participation, adding, “obviously Bill Clinton was booked.” He went on to proclaim, “Tonight we honor Steven Spielberg for his magnificent movie,Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Slayer!” But Spielberg gave as good as he got, beginning his remarks by saying, “When you tell your assistant to contact Marty, you just assume she understands you’re talking about Scorsese.”

The award for outstanding documentary work went to Malik Bendjelloul for Searching for Sugar Man, the doc about musician Sixto Rodriguez, which also is looking like an Oscar front-runner in its category following its Critics Choice and PGA wins.

On the television front, Lena Dunham took home the first award of the night, for the pilot of her HBO comedy, Girls. In her acceptance speech, the 26-year-old said for to consider her fellow nominees her peers was “surreal.”

Jay Roach claimed the award for best MOV/Mini-series for his Sarah Palin-focused HBO film Game Change and noted that it has been “a year in which political films got made and got a lot of attention.”

Rian Johnson, who was honored in the dramatic series category for an episode of AMC’s Breaking Bad, said he was “lucky and privileged to ride on the bus for a couple of stops.”

The evening’s penultimate moments were given over to a video tribute to director Milos Forman, recipient of the guild’s Lifetime Achievement Award. Actors like Annette Bening and Danny DeVito appeared in the piece, which recounted the Czech-born director’s remarkable career with clips from such movies as The Fireman’s Ball, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Amadeus and The People vs. Larry Flynt, which underscored the importance that Forman — who fled Communism in his native country to establish a second career in America — placed on freedom.

Because of illness, Forman, who lives in Connecticut, was not able to attend. But DGA president Taylor Hackford read a letter from Forman, in which he thanked the DGA twice. First, for the current award. And then for the directors like Mike NicholsSidney LumetFranklin Schaffner and Buck Henry who stood up for him in the ’70s when he was in danger of being deported by the United States. Taylor then led the room in a glasses-lifted-on-high toast to Forman.

Among the evening’s other honors: Former DGA president Michael Apted was presented with the Robert B. Aldrich Award for his service to the guild. Longtime CBS News director Eric Shapiro was given the Lifetime Achievement Award in News Direction. Susan Zwerman was recognized with the Frank Capra Achievement Award. And Dency Nelson received the Franklin J. Schaffner Achievement Award.

The event, hosted by Kelsey Grammer for the second consecutive year, was live-tweeted by The Hollywood Reporter’s Gregg Kilday. (View his live-blog here.)

Grammer began the show by joking that waiting to hear who won must be “torture” for Bigelow. Riffing on 2012’s films, he said “In Django we learned that the D was silent but the N was not.”

The complete list of nominees are here http://bit.ly/14yBIhK

by Aaron Couch, Gregg Kilday for hollywoodreporter.com

 

Steven Spielberg has crafted a literate, heartfelt film about Abraham Lincoln’s second term in office and his battle to end slavery, with a masterful central performance

lincoln_web

Lincoln trailer. Link to video: Lincoln: watch the exclusive international trailer

Abraham Lincoln‘s second term, with its momentous choices, has been brought to the screen by Steven Spielberg as a fascinatingly theatrical contest of rhetoric and strategy. It is a nest of high politics for the white ruling class, far from the brutality and chaos of the battlefield. At its centre is a gaunt Shakespearian figure, somewhere between Caesar and Prospero.

Spielberg has made a moving and honourably high-minded film about this world-changing moment of American history, his best for many years: I can’t imagine anyone not wanting to see it, and to experience the pleasures of something acted with such intelligence and depth. There is admittedly sometimes a hint of hokum; how you react to the film may depend on how you take the opening sequence in which Lincoln, seated like the famous statue but with an easy smile, listens to two black soldiers telling him how they see the war – a slightly Sorkinian scene that ends with one reciting the Gettysburg address while walking away from the president. It is a flight of fancy, not strictly plausible, but very effective in establishing a mood music that swells progressively throughout the picture.

Lincoln exerted a grip on me; it is literate, cerebral, heartfelt, with some brilliantly managed moments and, of course, a unique central performance from Daniel Day-Lewis. He portrays Lincoln as a devastating master of charm and exquisite manners, skilled in imposing his authority with a genial anecdote, a man with the natural leader’s trick of making people want to please him. He speaks in an unexpectedly light, clear voice that is nonetheless shading off into the maundering monologue of an old man, exhausted by war and personal catastrophes.

Day-Lewis, like Olivier before him, is a master of the voice and the walk: it’s almost as if he has alchemised his body shape into something different: bowed, spindly and angular, gnarled as a tree, exotic and yet natural as his tall hat, often holding the straight right arm at the elbow with the left behind his back: the civilian equivalent of military bearing. His Lincoln is aware that his strength is ebbing; he is on the point of ossifying into a legend incapable of action. He is often seen in semidarkness, his face turned down in contemplation of possible, terrible defeat, or the certain terrible cost of victory: like the Shikler portrait of Kennedy.

His political capital, though great, is a deteriorating asset, and as the civil war grinds on, Lincoln begins his second term wishing to stake it all on rushing through a constitutional amendment abolishing slavery before defeating the South. To get it through the system, he must do business with truculent radical Thaddeus Stevens (Tommy Lee Jones), and at the same time entreat conservative Republican Preston Blair (Hal Holbrook) for his faction’s votes. Blair’s condition is that Lincoln must swallow his pride and accept, or appear to accept, some sort of secret, provisional peace mission from the rebels in Virginia, a risky gesture that the president must conceal from his trusted secretary of state, William Seward (David Strathairn). Dangerous evasions and compromises are made, but the rebels stay strong; they do not surrender as Lincoln hopes and the awful, unthinkable truth is that he may have to abandon his anti-slavery amendment as a sop to get them to talk peace, end the bloodshed and preserve the Union. Has he gambled and lost?

There are some heartstoppingly good setpieces. The moment in which Lincoln has to raise the flag outside a naval building, after a short, self-deprecating speech that he has written on a piece of paper – kept in his hat – is a superbly managed scene: modest, undramatic, gently comic. Sally Field is outstanding as Lincoln’s wife, nursing rage and hurt that almost boils over as she must bandy words at a White House reception with Stevens, whom she detests: Spielberg shows Abraham in the background, chatting diplomatically but then noticing how Mrs Lincoln is about to damage his chances with a key ally. Read more here http://bit.ly/10V5OOs

 

by peter bradshaw for guardian.co.uk

SAG_Award1

LOS ANGELES (January 23, 2013) — Alan Arkin, Jessica Chastain, Daniel Day-Lewis, Sally Field, John Goodman, Damian Lewis and Julianne Moore will be presenters at the 19th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards®, Executive Producer Jeff Margolis announced today.

They join a growing roster of actors who will honor their colleagues at the SAG Awards that already includes Ben Affleck, Alec Baldwin, Bradley Cooper, Jeff Daniels, Viola Davis, Robert De Niro, Neil Patrick Harris, Anne Hathaway, SAG-AFTRA Co-President Ken Howard, Hugh Jackman, Nicole Kidman, Jennifer Lawrence, Julianna Margulies, Busy Philipps, SAG-AFTRA Co-President Roberta Reardon, Carl Reiner, Liev Schreiber, Taye Diggs, Justin Timberlake, Kerry Washington, Naomi Watts and Sigourney Weaver.

Oscar nominee Alan Arkin received his first SAG Award in 2007 as a member of the “Little Miss Sunshine” cast and was nominated for his supporting role in the film. He is currently nominated for his supporting role in “Argo” and as a member of the film’s cast. He’s got two comedies on tap: “Stand Up Guys,” opposite Al Pacino and Christopher Walken, and “The Incredible Burt Wonderstone,” opposite Steve Carell and Jim Carrey.

Golden Globe recipient and Oscar nominee Jessica Chastain earned a SAG Award in 2012 along with her fellow cast members in “The Help” and was nominated in the supporting actress category, as well. This year, she is nominated for her lead performance in Kathryn Bigelow’s “Zero Dark Thirty.” She currently stars in the Guillermo Del Toro-produced “Mama” and will soon be seen in the double feature “The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: His” and “The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Hers.”

Oscar nominee Daniel Day-Lewis was a Screen Actors Guild Award recipient in 2003 for his work in “Gangs of New York” and in 2008 for his role in “There Will Be Blood.” In 2010, he was nominated along with the cast of “Nine.” He has received a total of five SAG Awards nominations, including two this year for his title role in Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln” and as a member of the film’s cast.

Oscar nominee Sally Field is an eight-time SAG Awards nominee and the recipient of one Actor® statuette, for her role as Nora Walker in “Brothers & Sisters.” She’s nominated twice this year, for her performance as Mary Todd Lincoln in Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln” and as a member of the film’s cast. Last summer, she was seen as Aunt May in the blockbuster “The Amazing Spider-Man” opposite Andrew Garfield.

Along with his co-stars, four-time SAG Awards nominee John Goodman is recognized this year with a cast in a motion picture nomination for “Argo.” Other recent film roles include “Trouble With the Curve” and “Flight.” Next up are two dramas — the Coen Brothers’ “Inside Llewyn Davis” and George Clooney’s “The Monuments Men” — and the comedies “The Hangover: Part III” and “The Internship.” This summer, he reprises the role of Sulley in “Monsters University,” the sequel to the Disney-Pixar animated film “Monsters, Inc.”

Golden Globe recipient Damian Lewis is nominated for two SAG Awards: for his performance as Nicholas Brody in Showtime’s “Homeland,” which just finished its second season, and as a member of the series’ ensemble.

Julianne Moore is a Golden Globe recipient and SAG Awards nominee for her role as Sarah Palin in “Game Change.” She has received a total of 10 SAG Awards nominations in her career. Upcoming movie roles include “What Maisie Knew” with Alexander Skarsgard; “Don Jon’s Addiction” with Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Scarlett Johansson; “The Seventh Son” with Jeff Bridges; “Carrie” with Chloe Grace Moretz; and the action thriller “Non-Stop.”

The 19th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards, one of the awards season’s premier events, will be simulcast live coast-to-coast on TNT and TBS on Sunday, Jan. 27, 2013, at 8 p.m. (ET)/5 p.m. (PT) from the Shrine Exposition Center in Los Angeles. An encore primetime telecast will begin immediately following on TNT at 10 p.m. (ET)/7 p.m. (PT). The ceremony will also be telecast internationally, as well as to U.S. military installations overseas through the American Forces Network Broadcast Center.

source: sagawards.com

 

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This morning the Academy Award nominationswere revealed, and as usual, they’re bound to inspire debates over who got snubbed.

In light of today’s news (and, ahem, no Best Actor nomination for Jamie Foxx’s work in Django Unchained), we’re looking back at the biggest Oscar snubs of all time. To be clear, we’re not squabbling about nominees who should’ve won their categories—we’re talking about iconic and classic performances or films that were inexplicably overlooked and failed to even receive nominations.

15. Gary OldmanSid and Nancy (1986)
Overlooked for: Best Actor
Nominated Instead: Paul Newman (The Color of Money), Dexter Gordon (Round Midnight), William Hurt (Children of a Lesser God), Bob Hoskins (Mona Lisa), James Woods (Salvador)
It’s always tough to play a real person, but to play a punk icon/raging drug addict/probable murderer less than a decade after his high-profile death is a nearly impossible task. Oldman transformed into Sid Vicious for this film, both physically (at one point being hospitalized for losing too much weight for the role) and emotionally, pouring himself into the role.

14. Kathleen TurnerBody Heat (1981)
Overlooked for: Best Actress
Nominated Instead: Katherine Hepburn (On Golden Pond), Diane Keaton (Reds), Marsha Mason (Only When I Laugh), Susan Sarandon (Atlantic City), Meryl Streep (The French Lieutenant’s Woman)
As femme fatale Matty Walker in this neo-noir, Kathleen Turner made her film debut, but her performance makes it seem as though she’s been doing this forever—oozing the style, confidence and sensuality of a bygone era.

13. Steven SpielbergJaws (1975)
Overlooked for: Best Director
Nominated Instead: Milos Forman (One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest), Robert Altman (Nashville), Federico Fellini (Amarcord), Stanley Kubrick (Barry Lyndon), Sidney Lumet (Dog Day Afternoon)
Sure, the directors’ category was pretty stacked in 1975, and it’s tough to decide who we’d bump to make room for him, but with Jaws, Steven Spielberg essentially created the summer blockbuster and forever changed how we see movies while laying the groundwork for the auteur’s impressive career—no small feat.

12. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
Overlooked for: Best Picture
Nominated InsteadOliver!Funny GirlThe Lion in WinterRachel, RachelRomeo and Juliet
As we wrote when we declared this one of the slowest (but also greatest) movies of all time, “Straddling the boundary between art film and sci-fi epic, Stanley Kubrick’s space-age fantasia is loaded with arresting images. The legendary opening, with the apes and the bone—would you really want that passage hurried? The scene builds like a symphony, and then hurtles us into space, where the action moves with appropriate gravity. The menace of HAL is partly in the deliberateness with which he operates. If you’re looking for exploding Death Stars and quippy little alien creatures, you’ve come to the wrong place. Kubrick takes interstellar life seriously.” If you’re still not convinced, think about how visually stunning the film remains to this day and consider what it’d be like to watch it in 1968—before we’d even put a man on the moon.

11. Dennis HopperBlue Velvet (1986)
Overlooked for: Best Supporting Actor
Nominated Instead: Michael Caine (Hannah and Her Sisters), Tom Berenger (Platoon), Willem Dafoe (Platoon), Denholm Elliot (A Room With A View), Dennis Hopper (Hoosiers)
The Academy chose the wrong 1986 Dennis Hopper performance. He’s great in Hoosiers, but as Frank Booth in David Lynch’s Blue Velvet, he’s positively terrifying. Booth is one of the most memorable movie villains of all time—sometimes funny, frequently disturbing and always riveting. Plus, he was drinking PBRbefore it was cool.

10. The Dark Knight (2008)
Overlooked for: Best Picture
Nominated InsteadSlumdog MillionaireThe Curious Case of Benjamin ButtonFrost/NixonMilkThe Reader
The Dark Knight was more than just a movie; it was an event. Christopher Nolan’s sequel to Batman Begins managed to transcend genre and become much more than a simple comic-book movie. It’s a visually stunning morality tale that raises some important questions about good and evil, and Heath Ledger’s performance as The Joker—hideous, deranged and yet hugely charismatic—is one for the ages.

9. Bette Davis, Of Human Bondage (1934)
Overlooked for: Best Actress
Nominated Instead: Claudette Colbert (It Happened One Night), Grace Moore (One Night of Love), Norma Shearer (The Barretts of Wimpole Street)
There was such a massive public outcry when Bette Davis was snubbed for her star-making performance in Of Human Bondage that the Academy essentially owned up to their mistake and actually allowed a special write-in campaign to get her on the ballot.

8. Alfred Hitchcock, North By Northwest (1959) (but also basically every other film he made)
Overlooked for: Best Director
Nominated Instead: William Wyler (Ben-Hur), Jack Clayton (Room at the Top), Billy Wilder (Some Like It Hot), George Stevens (The Diary of Anne Frank), Fred Zinnerman (The Nun’s Story)
The fact that one of the greatest—if not the greatest—directors of all time never received a Best Director Oscar seems unreal and borderline criminal. Despite making almost 60 films, the lion’s share of which his directorial work is more than worthy of a nomination, Hitch was only nominated for the award five times and never won.

7. The Shining (1980)
Overlooked for: Best Picture
Nominated InsteadOrdinary PeopleCoal Miner’s DaughterThe Elephant ManRaging BullTess
Though it’s considered a classic today, The Shining failed to receive the recognition it deserved when it initially came out; in fact, it actually received two Razzie nominations—a Worst Actress nod for Shelley Duvall and a Worst Director nomination for Stanley Kubrick. Thankfully, audiences have since come to their senses and realized what a gem this Stephen King adaptation truly is.

6. Anthony Perkins, Psycho (1960)
Overlooked for: Best Actor
Nominated Instead: Burt Lancaster (Elmer Gantry), Spencer Tracy (Inherit The Wind), Trevor Howard (Sons and Lovers), Jack Lemmon (The Apartment), Laurence Olivier (The Entertainer)
Like the director himself, Alfred Hitchcock’s actors were historically overlooked by the Academy. As the villainous Norman Bates, Perkins played against type and delivered an iconic, creepy, yet wildly sympathetic performance. Norman’s a murderer with his dead mom stuffed in the attic, but he’s also a seemingly sweet, awkward guy who just got pushed to the brink by an unbearable relative. Hey, we all go a little mad sometimes, right?

5. Gene Kelly, Singin’ in the Rain (1952)
Overlooked for: Best Actor
Nominated Instead: Gary Cooper (High Noon), Marlon Brando (Viva Zapata!), Kirk Douglas (The Bad and the Beautiful), Jose Ferrer (Moulin Rouge), Alec Guinness (The Lavender Hill Mob)
The epitome of Old Hollywood glamour—and a triple threat if ever there was one—Gene Kelly received a special Oscar in 1952 (the same year he stunned in An American in Paris) for “his versatility as an actor, singer, director and dancer, and specifically for his brilliant achievements in the art of choreography on film.” That same year, he turned in arguably his most iconic performance in Singin’ In The Rain, but despite his exuding grace and pure joy in the titular number, the Academy rained on his parade at the following ceremony and failed to recognize him.

4. Sidney Poitier, In the Heat of the Night (1967)
Overlooked for: Best Actor
Nominated Instead: Rod Steiger (In the Heat of the Night), Warren Beatty (Bonnie and Clyde), Dustin Hoffman (The Graduate), Paul Newman (Cool Hand Luke), Spencer Tracy (Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner)
In 1967, Sidney Poitier starred in not one, but two extremely important films about race. At a time when Civil Rights tensions were boiling over, Poitier brought a glimpse of the African-American experience to the mainstream. His white co-stars (Rod Steiger for In the Heat of the Night and Spencer Tracy for Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner) were both nominated for their portrayals of men who must confront their own prejudices, but Poitier himself wasn’t rewarded for his work. His performance as homicide detective Virgil Tibbs in In the Heat of the Night is especially profound, as he brings a quiet, restrained anger to the performance.

3. Do The Right Thing (1989)
Overlooked for: Best Picture
Nominated InsteadDriving Miss DaisyBorn on the Fourth of JulyDead Poets SocietyField of Dreams,My Left Foot
As Scott Wold wrote when we declared it the third-best movie of the ’80s, “the violence of Do the Right Thing erupts as an extension of literal and metaphorical long-simmering neighborhood temperatures, and finally boils over as something of a catharsis while never coming off as mawkish, or giving audiences the ability to escape conversation after the credits roll. A remarkable cast sells the complicated relationship with their Brooklyn neighborhood flawlessly.” The titular “right thing” in the film is hazy and thought-provoking, but instead, Driving Miss Daisy—a story about race with a much more upbeat, Hollywood ending in which the two protagonists put aside their differences and share a piece of pie—took home the top prize.

2. Hoop Dreams (1994)
Overlooked for: Best Documentary Feature
Nominated InsteadMaya Lin: A Strong Clear VisionComplaints of a Dutiful DaughterD-Day RememberedFreedom on My MindA Great Day in Harlem
Hoop Dreams is one of the best films of the ‘90s—documentary or otherwise—and despite appearing on more critics’ Top 10 lists than any other movie in a stacked year that included Pulp FictionForrest Gumpand The Shawshank Redemption, it failed to make even the shortlist for the Oscars. There was (justifiable) outrage, and many campaigned for the film to be nominated for Best Picture, but sadly, director Steve James and his team got shafted. History repeated itself last year when James’ The Interrupters was overlooked as well.

1. Vertigo (1958)
Overlooked for: Best Picture, Best Actor (James Stewart), Best Director (Alfred Hitchcock)
Nominated Instead: Best Picture: GigiCat on a Hot Tin RoofAuntie MameSeparate TablesThe Defiant Ones
Vertigo is Alfred Hitchcock’s masterpiece, and it features frequent collaborator Jimmy Stewart’s finest performance. As we wrote when we declared it to be the best Hitchcock film, “His typically warm everyman on-screen persona is gone, and here he’s neurotic, cold and obsessed—and brilliant. It’s also regarded as Hitchcock’s most personal film; the idea of a man remaking a woman in the image of another he’s lost is often said to reflect the director’s decision to keep casting Grace Kelly-esque blondes after feeling abandoned by Kelly, who retired from acting in 1956.” So, what did Vertigo get at the Oscars? Squat, save for a few minor technical nominations. For shame, Academy voters, for shame.

 

— image taken from fineartamerica.com articles written by bonnie stiernberg for paste magazine

 

_dga-awards

The Directors Guild of America has released nominees for its Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film award, which will be presented at the 65th annual DGA Awards Dinner on February 2 at Hollywood & Highland. The guild will reveal its TV noms tomorrow. Here’s the film list, a group that includes first-time nominee Ben Affleck (Argo) and 11-time nominee Steven Spielberg (Lincoln):

BEN AFFLECK
Argo
(Warner Bros. Pictures)
Mr. Affleck’s Directorial Team:
· Unit Production Manager: Amy Herman
· First Assistant Director: David Webb
· Second Assistant Director: Ian Calip
· Second Second Assistant Directors: Clark Credle, Gavin Kleintop
· First Assistant Director (Turkey Unit): Belkis Turan
This is Mr. Affleck’s first DGA Feature Film Award nomination.

KATHRYN BIGELOW
Zero Dark Thirty
(Columbia Pictures)
Ms. Bigelow’s Directorial Team:
· Unit Production Manager: Colin Wilson
· First Assistant Director: David A. Ticotin
· Second Assistant Directors: Ben Lanning, Sarah Hood
· First Assistant Director (Jordan Unit): Scott Robertson
· Second Assistant Directors (Jordan Unit): Jonas Spaccarotelli, Yanal Kassay
· Second Second Assistant Director (Jordan Unit): Tarek Afifi
· Unit Production Manager (India Unit): Rajeev Mehra
This is Ms. Bigelow’s second DGA Feature Film Award nomination. She won the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film for The Hurt Locker in 2009.

TOM HOOPER
Les Misérables
(Universal Pictures)
Mr. Hooper’s Directorial Team:
· Unit Production Manager: Patrick Schweitzer
· First Assistant Director: Ben Howarth
· Second Assistant Director: Harriet Worth
· Second Second Assistant Director: Dan Channing Williams
This is Mr. Hooper’s second DGA Feature Film Award nomination. He won the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film for The King’s Speech (2010) and was previously nominated for the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Movies for Television/Mini-Series for John Adams in 2008.

ANG LEE
Life of Pi
(Twentieth Century Fox)
Mr. Lee’s Directorial Team:
· Unit Production Manager: Michael J. Malone
· Unit Production Manager (Taiwan): Leo Chen
· First Assistant Directors: William M. Connor, Cliff Lanning
· Second Assistant Directors: Robert Burgess, Ben Lanning
· Unit Production Manager (India Unit): Sanjay Kumar
· First Assistant Director (India Unit): Nitya Mehra
· Second Assistant Director (India Unit): Ananya Rane
· Second Second Assistant Directors (India Unit): Namra Parikh, Freya Parekh
· Second Assistant Directors (Montreal Unit): Derek Wimble, Renato De Cotiis
This is Mr. Lee’s fourth DGA Feature Film Award nomination. He won the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film for Brokeback Mountain (2005) and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000) and was nominated for Sense and Sensibility in 1995.

STEVEN SPIELBERG
Lincoln
(DreamWorks Pictures/Twentieth Century Fox)
Mr. Spielberg’s Directorial Team:
· Unit Production Manager: Susan McNamara
· First Assistant Director: Adam Somner
· Second Assistant Director: Ian Stone
· Second Second Assistant Directors: Eric Lasko, Trevor Tavares
This is Mr. Spielberg’s eleventh DGA Feature Film Award nomination. He won the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film three times for Saving Private Ryan (1998), Schindler’s List (1993) and The Color Purple (1985). He was also nominated in this category for Munich (2005), Amistad (1997), Empire of the Sun (1987), E.T.: The Extra Terrestrial (1982), Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) and Jaws (1975). Mr. Spielberg was honored with the DGA’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2000.

 

— article taken from deadline.com

The full list of this year’s BAFTA nominations, which see Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln out on top.

Steven Spielberg’s presidential biopic Lincoln leads the pack in this year’s nominations for the EE British Academy Film Awards (BAFTAs), with 10 nods including Best Film, Adapted Screenplay, and Daniel Day-Lewis as Leading Actor.

Les Misérables and Life of Pi follow close behind with nine nominations apiece. Les Misérables is nominated as both Best Film and Outstanding British Film, with further nominations for Hugh Jackman as Leading Actor and Anne Hathaway as Supporting Actress. Life of Pi is up for Best Film, Adapted Screenplay and Best Director for Ang Lee.

Other films with multiple nominations include Skyfall, the latest Bond film, with eight; Ben Affleck’s political thriller Argo, with seven; the Tolstoy adaptation Anna Karenina with six; and Django Unchained and Zero Dark Thirty with five each.

Nominees for the EE Rising Star Award, voted for by the public and presented to an actor of promising talent, include Elizabeth Olsen, Andrea Riseborough, Suraj Sharma, Juno Temple and Alicia Vikander.

“It’s great to see a diverse range of British films nominated across so many categories at this year’s BAFTAs,” comments Ben Roberts, Director of the BFI Film Fund. “Coming just ahead of tomorrow’s Oscar nominations, BAFTA is once again doing a fantastic job of spotlighting ambitious, large-scale British filmmaking just as the international awards season gets into full swing.”

Three films supported by the BFI Film Fund have received nominations: Martin McDonagh’s Seven Psychopaths for Outstanding British Film; Mike Newell’s Great Expectations for Costume Design; and Fyzal Boulifa’s The Curse for Short Film. Roberts adds: “I’m also really proud to see three films backed by the BFI Film Fund nominated, and my warmest congratulations go to everyone involved in those and indeed all the nominated films.”

The awards will be announced on Sunday 10 February at a ceremony hosted by Stephen Fry at the Royal Opera House, London.

Best Film

Argo – Grant Heslov, Ben Affleck, George Clooney
Les Misérables – Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Debra Hayward, Cameron Mackintosh
Life of Pi – Gil Netter, Ang Lee, David Womark
Lincoln – Steven Spielberg, Kathleen Kennedy
Zero Dark Thirty – Mark Boal, Kathryn Bigelow, Megan Ellison

Outstanding British Film

Anna Karenina – Joe Wright, Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Paul Webster, Tom Stoppard
The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel – John Madden, Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin, Ol Parker
Les Misérables – Tom Hooper, Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Debra Hayward, Cameron Mackintosh, William Nicholson, Alain Boublil, Claude-Michel Schönberg, Herbert Kretzmer
Seven Psychopaths – Martin McDonagh, Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin
Skyfall – Sam Mendes, Michael G. Wilson, Barbara Broccoli, Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, John Logan

Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer

Bart Layt (Director), Dimitri Doganis (Producer) – The Imposter
David Morris (Director), Jacqui Morris (Director/Producer) – McCullin Dexter Fletcher (Director/Writer), Danny King (Writer) – Wild Bill
James Bobin (Director) – The Muppets
Tina Gharavi (Director/Writer) – I Am Nasrine

Film Not in the English Language

Amour – Michael Haneke, Margaret Ménégoz
Headhunters – Morten Tyldum, Marianne Gray, Asle Vatn
The Hunt – Thomas Vinterberg, Sisse Graum Jørgensen, Morten Kaufmann
Rust and Bone – Jacques Audiard, Pascal Caucheteux
Untouchable – Eric Toledano, Olivier Nakache, Nicolas Duval Adassovsky, Yann Zenou, Laurent Zeitoun

Documentary

The Imposter – Bart Layton, Dimitri Doganis
Marley – Kevin Macdonald, Steve Bing, Charles Steel
McCullin – David Morris, Jacqui Morris
Searching for Sugar Man – Malik Bendjelloul, Simon Chinn
West of Memphis – Amy Berg

Animated Film

Brave – Mark Andrews, Brenda Chapman
Frankenweenie – Tim Burton
Paranorman – Sam Fell, Chris Butler

Director

Amour – Michael Haneke
Argo – Ben Affleck
Django Unchained – Quentin Tarantino
Life of Pi – Ang Lee
Zero Dark Thirty – Kathryn Bigelow

Original Screenplay

Amour – Michael Haneke
Django Unchained – Quentin Tarantino
The Master – Paul Thomas Anderson
Moonrise Kingdom – Wes Anderson, Roman Coppola
Zero Dark Thirty – Mark Boal

Adapted Screenplay

Argo – Chris Terrio
Beasts of the Southern Wild – Lucy Alibar, Benh Zeitlin
Life of Pi – David Magee
Lincoln – Tony Kushner
Silver Linings Playbook – David O. Russell

Leading Actor

Ben Affleck – Argo
Bradley Cooper – Silver Linings Playbook
Daniel Day-Lewis – Lincoln
Hugh Jackman – Les Misérables
Joaquin Phoenix –The Master

Leading Actress

Emmanuelle Riva – Amour
Helen Mirren – Hitchcock
Jennifer Lawrence – Silver Linings Playbook
Jessica Chastain – Zero Dark Thirty
Marion Cotillard – Rust and Bone

Supporting Actor

Alan Arkin – Argo
Christoph Waltz – Django Unchained
Javier Bardem – Skyfall
Philip Seymour Hoffman – The Master
Tommy Lee Jones – Lincoln

Supporting Actress

Amy Adams – The Master
Anne Hathaway – Les Misérables
Helen Hunt – The Sessions
Judi Dench – Skyfall
Sally Field – Lincoln

Original Music

Anna Karenina – Dario Marianelli
Argo – Alexandre Desplat
Life of Pi – Mychael Danna
Lincoln – John Williams
Skyfall – Thomas Newman

Cinematography

Anna Karenina – Seamus McGarvey
Les Misérables – Danny Cohen
Life of Pi – Claudio Miranda
Lincoln – Janusz Kaminski
Skyfall  – Roger Deakins

Editing

Argo – William Goldenberg
Django Unchained – Fred Raskin
Life of Pi – Tim Squyres
Skyfall – Stuart Baird
Zero Dark Thirty – Dylan Tichenor, William Goldenberg

Production Design

Anna Karenina – Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer
Les Misérables – Eve Stewart, Anna Lynch-Robinson
Life of Pi – David Gropman, Anna Pinnock
Lincoln – Rick Carter, Jim Erickson
Skyfall – Dennis Gassner, Anna Pinnock

Costume Design

Anna Karenina – Jacqueline Durran
Great Expectations – Beatrix Aruna Pasztor
Les Misérables – Paco Delgado
Lincoln – Joanna Johnston
Snow White and the Huntsman – Colleen Atwood

Make-up and Hair

Anna Karenina – Ivana Primorac
Hitchcock – Julie Hewett, Martin Samuel, Howard Berger
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey – Peter Swords King, Richard Taylor, Rick Findlater
Les Misérables – Lisa Westcott
Lincoln – Lois Burwell, Kay Georgiou

Sound

Django Unchained – Mark Ulano, Michael Minkler, Tony Lamberti, Wylie Stateman
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey – Tony Johnson, Christopher Boyes, Michael Hedges, Michael Semanick, Brent Burge, Chris Ward
Les Misérables – Simon Hayes, Andy Nelson, Mark Paterson, Jonathan Allen, Lee Walpole, John Warhurst
Life of Pi – Drew Kunin, Eugene Gearty, Philip Stockton, Ron Bartlett, D. M. Hemphill
Skyfall – Stuart Wilson, Scott Millan, Greg P. Russell, Per Hallberg, Karen Baker Landers

Special Visual Effects

The Dark Knight Rises – Paul Franklin, Chris Corbould, Peter Bebb, Andrew Lockley
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey – Joe Letteri, Eric Saindon, David Clayton, R. Christopher White
Life of Pi – Bill Westenhofer, Guillaume Rocheron, Erik-Jan De Boer
Marvel Avengers Assemble – Nominees TBC
Prometheus – Richard Stammers, Charley Henley, Trevor Wood, Paul Butterworth

Short Animation

Here to Fall – Kris Kelly, Evelyn McGrath
I’m Fine Thanks – Eamonn O’Neill
The Making of Longbird – Will Anderson, Ainslie Henderson

Short Film

The Curse – Fyzal Boulifa, Gavin Humphries
Good Night – Muriel d’Ansembourg, Eva Sigurdardottir
Swimmer – Lynne Ramsay, Peter Carlton, Diarmid Scrimshaw
Tumult – Johnny Barrington, Rhianna Andrews
The Voorman Problem – Mark Gill, Baldwin Li

The EE Rising Star Award (voted for by the public)

Elizabeth Olsen
Andrea Riseborough
Suraj Sharma
Juno Temple
Alicia Vikander

–taken from bfi.org.uk

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