Tag Archive: Academy Award


Culled from over 2800 entries, the 60 films that will play in New York will compete for Oscar contention.

WHERE THEY GO: Elijah Wood
Katy Winn/Getty Images

The Tribeca Film Festival‘s 2013 lineup has added 60 short films that run the gamut from documentary to narrative and experimental and include stars such as Elijah WoodElle Fanning and Lauren Ambrose.

The program is broken down into eight categories, with themes that include first person narrative, late night genre (think: vampires and werewolves), New York City and apocalyptic disasters.

Beyond festival recognition, the winners of Tribeca’s Best Narrative Short award and Best Documentary Short awards will be automatically qualified for next year’s Academy Awards, circumventing other required points of entry.

The festival, in its 12th year, received over 2800 entries, and the final selection of 60 films represent 19 different nations. Read more here: http://bit.ly/WFmFDj

The Tribeca Film Festival will run from April 17-28, kicked off by an opening night documentary about and concert starring indie rock band The National. The roster of full length features that will play at the festival include projects from Paul RuddJulianne MooreRussell CroweJohn Slattery and Naomi Watts.

 

Sight and Sound asked filmmakers to list their favorite films of all-time. Take a look at Quentin Tarantino’s top picks and then take our poll below.

Apocalypse Now (1976) – Francis Ford Coppola
The Bad News Bears (1976) – Michael Ritchie
Carrie (1976) – Brian De Palma
Dazed and Confused (1993) – Richard Linklater
The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (1966) – Sergio Leone
The Great Escape (1963) – John Sturges
His Girl Friday (1939) – Howard Hawks
Jaws (1975) – Steven Spielberg
Pretty Maids All in a Row (1971) – Roger Vadium
Rolling Thunder (1977) – John Flynn
Sorcerer (1977) – William Friedkin
Taxi Driver (1976) – Martin Scorsese

Read more about Tarantino here: http://bit.ly/Xk0rr4

 

From the outside, it looked like Steven Spielberg’s political biopic would walk the Oscars, but canny campaigning saw Ben Affleck‘s Iran-hostage drama pip it at the post. Here’s how they did it

Argo and Lincoln

Head to head … Argo and Lincoln

Argo‘s yo-yo awards season ended on an upswing on Sunday as the Tehran yarn clinched the Big Kahuna of movie honours. Ben Affleck‘s third outing as director endured the proverbial rollercoaster ride over the past five months and the Warner Bros crowd will be partying late into the night after winning best picture. This was the first time since Driving Miss Daisy in 1989 that the prize had gone to a movie whose director had not been nominated for an Oscar.

  1. Argo
  2. Production year: 2012
  3. Country: USA
  4. Cert (UK): 15
  5. Runtime: 120 mins
  6. Directors: Ben Affleck
  7. Cast: Alan Arkin, Ben Affleck, Bryan Cranston, Christopher Denham, Clea DuVall, John Goodman, Kerry Bishe, Rory Cochrane, Scoot McNairy, Tate Donovan, Victor Garber
  8. More on this film

The popular narrative of what has been an unusually high-calibre awards season is that Argo – the people’s favourite – snuck in at the eleventh hour to swipe the best picture prize from Lincoln. Not so. Argo never lost its high standing among voters and maintained its campaign momentum – albeit in a more nuanced manner in recent weeks – despite the mighty efforts of the publicity machine behind Steven Spielberg‘s august history lesson.

The campaign machine was chugging along nicely and then on 8 October, four days before Argo was due to open in US cinemas, Lincoln premiered at the New York film festival. Spielberg was about to throw a spanner in the works. Suddenly Argo was no longer the name on everyone’s lips. Lincoln was being hailed in some quarters as a masterpiece, perhaps Spielberg’s best since Schindler’s List. Hollywood lined up to kneel before the altar of Daniel Day-Lewis. An air of invincibility coalesced around Lincoln as the first awards groups prepared to announce their winners.

Day-Lewis as Abraham Lincoln was a match made in prestige movie heaven and the Anglo-Irish actor dominated his category, earning accolades from just about every awards group including the influential Screen Actors Guild, the largest voting block in the Academy. He duly won his third lead actor Oscar on Sunday and became the first man to do so. Spielberg did not make it on to the winners’ podium and, in a rare surprise on the night, had to watch as Ang Lee won best director for Life of Pi.

Read more here: http://bit.ly/XvUPak

By the start of the year Lincoln had garnered the most Golden Globe and Oscar nominations and was the perceived frontrunner. This suited the Argo camp, which wanted their contender to be the marginal underdog. At the Golden Globes in January, Lincoln suffered its first public reversal as Argo prevailed in the best dramatic picture contest and Affleck beat Spielberg in the directing category.

Two weeks later, over the course of one heady weekend, Argo delivered a one-two punch to land best picture at the Producers Guild of America and best ensemble cast at the Screen Actors Guild. On 3 February Affleck became only the third person to win the DGA award without an Oscar nomination. Two weeks later Chris Terrio won the WGA’s adapted screenplay honour. The votes for successive shows had already been cast. The late cascade of prizes may have seemed like people were suddenly championing Argo, but in reality the movie’s enduring pedigree never wavered and Hollywood had made up its mind.

 

 

Michael Haneke

 

Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

After several failed attempts, the director won the best foreign language film award for “Amour” as his home country had its best Oscar outing since 1961.

It’s been a long wait with several failed attempts, but Michael Haneke has finally won the best foreign language Oscar for his home country, Austria.

When Haneke’s Amour was named as the award winner Sunday night, it marked the end of a long struggle by the Austrian government to have Haneke’s films – many of which like Amour have been in French – accepted as properly Austrian in the eyes of the Academy.

Foreign language films can now be in any language other than English. Their nationality is determined by the creative force behind the film.

Read more here: http://bit.ly/YvM6B7

Alongside Haneke, that deep Austrian talent pool includes Vienna hometown hero Christoph Waltz, who took home his second best supporting actor Oscar Sunday for his role as German bounty hunter King Schultz in Quentin Tarantino‘s Django Unchained.

Two Austrian Oscars in one night – that hasn’t  happened since 1961, when Billy Wilder won three Oscars in a single year for The Apartment. The film took home the best picture, best director and best original screenplay honors that year.

 

  • Directing

    A government official in the director’s native Taiwan praises his accomplishment, while Indian stars tweet in delight over Lee’s statement in Hindi during his acceptance speech.

HONG KONG and DELHI – Just hours after bagging an Oscar statuette in Los Angeles, Ang Lee has been told of yet another award coming his way: an honorary citizen’s medal from the municipal authorities of Taichuing, the Taiwanese city where he shot the ocean scenes in Life of Pi.

Speaking to the Taiwanese CNA news agency, Taichung mayor Jason Hu – who watched the awards ceremony after a medical check-up in a Taipei hospital – said Lee deserves the Best Director prize, and that he thanked Lee for putting the island on the map by shooting Life of Pi there and then giving Taiwan a call-out in his acceptance speech.

Hu said Lee, who was born in southern Taiwan and left the island to study filmmaking in the US in 1979, should be accorded with recognition by the Taiwanese government, and he will make the filmmaker an honorary citizen of Taichung.

Read more about Ang Lee here: http://bit.ly/VHDmuV

Life of Pi has proven to be a hit in Taiwan, where it took US$15.6 million. The film also took about US$85 million on mainland China, an amount which surpassed its American earnings of US$69.6 million.

Meanwhile, Lee set the Indian blogosphere alight by concluding his acceptance speech on Sunday night with a salutation in Hindi.

“YES!!! Life of Pi wins four Oscars, with most deserved Best Director Oscar for Ang Lee, who ended speech with ‘Namaste,’” actor Kabir Bedi posted on his twitter account.

“Congratulations to the entire team of Life Of Pi and to the Genius called Ang Lee. Proud to have worked with him.:),” said a tweet by actor Anupam Kher,who was at the Oscar ceremony as part of the ensemble cast of Silver Linings Playbook. Kher — who also posted a photo of himself with Lee taken at a pre-Oscar party — had earlier worked with the two-time Oscar winning director in 2007’sLust, Caution.

“Ohhhh how beautiful to see Ang Lee on the stage. He truly truly truly deserves it,” tweeted actorAdil Hussain who stars in Life of Pi, playing the principal character’s father.

Perhaps the tweet that best captured the enthusiasm of Lee’s Oscar win and acceptance speech came from Bollywood banner Balaji Telefilms CEO Tanuj Garg: “Every Indian has just had an orgasm over Ang Lee’s ‘namaste.’”

 

After about six months of buzz, noise, gripes, campaigning, smearing and whatnot, the 85th Academy Awards are finally here. It’s been a long and eventful season and one of the most interesting in recent years if only because the winners weren’t locked up in advance like “The Artist” last year. In fact, it’s been one of the most up and down, surprising seasons in an age. “Argo” took the buzz early on in Telluride, “Silver Linings Playbook” took the baton after that in Toronto when it won the coveted Audience Award and then “Zero Dark Thirty,” “Lincoln” and “Life of Pi” entered the fray later in the fall and changed everything (remember when everyone thought “Les Misérables” would be the frontrunner after those reports of audiences crying and cheering?). But the “Argo” groundswell started to mount late in the game after director Ben Affleck was snubbed by the Academy during the nominations and the ground started moving under everyone’s feet again.

Read more about Oscars here: http://bit.ly/YqxuoM

Best Picture
“Amour”
WINNER: “Argo”
“Beasts Of The Southern Wild”
“Django Unchained”
“Les Misérables”
“Life Of Pi”
“Lincoln”
“Silver Linings Playbook”
“Zero Dark Thirty”

Best Director
Michael Haneke – “Amour”
Benh Zeitlin – “Beasts Of The Southern Wild”
WINNER: Ang Lee – “Life Of Pi”
Steven Spielberg – “Lincoln”
David O. Russell – “Silver Linings Playbook”

Best Actor In A Leading Role
Denzel Washington – “Flight”
Hugh Jackman – “Les Misérables”
Daniel Day-Lewis – “Lincoln”
Joaquin Phoenix – “The Master”
Bradley Cooper – “Silver Linings Playbook”

Best Actress In A Leading Role
Emmanuelle Riva – “Amour”
Quvenzhane Wallis – “Beasts Of The Southern Wild”
Naomi Watts – “The Impossible”
Jennifer Lawrence – “Silver Linings Playbook”
Jessica Chastain – “Zero Dark Thirty”

Best Actor In A Supporting Role
WINNER: Christoph Waltz – “Django Unchained”
Robert De Niro – “Silver Linings Playbook”
Alan Arkin – “Argo”
Tommy Lee Jones – “Lincoln”
Philip Seymour Hoffman – “The Master”

Best Actress In A Supporting Role
WINNER: Anne Hathaway – “Les Misérables”
Sally Field – “Lincoln”
Amy Adams “The Master”
Helen Hunt – “The Sessions”
Jacki Weaver – “Silver Linings Playbook”

Best Original Screenplay
Michael Haneke – “Amour”
WINNER: Quentin Tarantino – “Django Unchained”
John Gatins – “Flight”
Wes Anderson & Roman Coppola – “Moonrise Kingdom”
Mark Boal – “Zero Dark Thirty”

Best Adapted Screenplay
WINNER: Chris Terrio – “Argo”
Lucy Alibar, Benh Zeitlin – “Beasts of the Southern Wild”
David Magee – “Life of Pi”
Tony Kushner – “Lincoln”
David O. Russell – “Silver Linings Playbook”

Best Foreign Language Film
WINNER: “Amour”
“Kon-Tiki”
“No”
“A Royal Affair”
“War Witch”

Best Animated Feature Film
WINNER: “Brave”
“Frankenweenie”
ParaNorman
“The Pirates! Band of Misfits”
“Wreck-It Ralph”

Best Original Song
“Before My Time” – “Chasing Ice”
“Pi’s Lullaby” – “Life of Pi”
“Suddenly” – “Les Miserables
“Skyfall” – “Skyfall”
“Everybody Needs a Best Friend” – “Ted”

Best Cinematography
WINNER: Claudio Miranda – “Life of Pi”
Seamus McGarvey – “Anna Karenina”
Robert Richardson – “Django Unchained”
Janusz Kaminski – “Lincoln”
Roger Deakins – “Skyfall”

Best Film Editing
WINNER: William Goldenberg – “Argo”
Tim Squyres – “Life of Pi”
Michael Kahn – Lincoln
Jay Cassidy and Crispin Struthers – “Silver Linings Playbook”
William Goldenberg, Dylan Tichenor – Zero Dark Thirty

Best Costume Design
WINNER: Jacqueline Durran – “Anna Karenina”
Paco Delgado – “Les Misérables”
Joanna Johnston – “Lincoln”
Eiko Ishioka – “Mirror Mirror”
Colleen Atwood – “Snow White and the Huntsman

Best Documentary Feature
WINNER: “Searching For Sugar Man”
“5 Broken Cameras”
“The Gatekeepers”
“How To Survive A Plague”
“The Invisible War”

Best Visual Effects
WINNER: “Life of Pi”
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey
“Marvel’s The Avengers”
“Prometheus”
“Snow White and the Huntsman”

Best Production Design
WINNER:Rick Carter, Jim Erickson, Peter T Frank – “Lincoln”
Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer – “Anna Karenina”
Dan Hennah, Ra Vincent, Simon Bright – “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey”
Eve Stewart – “Les Misérables”
David Gropman, Anna Pinnock – “Life of Pi”

Best Original Score
WINNER: Mychael Danna – “Life of Pi”
Dario Marianelli – “Anna Karenina”
Alexandre Desplat – “Argo”
John Williams – “Lincoln”
Thomas Newman – “Skyfall”

Best Make Up
WINNER: “Les Misérables”
“Hitchcock”
“The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey”

Best Sound Editing
WINNER: (TIE) “Skyfall” and “Zero Dark Thirty”
“Argo”
“Django Unchained”
“Life of Pi”

Best Sound Mixing
WINNER: “Les Misérables”
“Argo”
“Life of Pi”
“Lincoln”
“Skyfall

Best Documentary Short Film
WINNER: “Inocente”
“Kings Point”
“Mondays At Racine”
“Open Heart”
“Redemption”

Best Animated Short
WINNER: “Paperman”
“Adam and Dog”
“Fresh Guacamole”
“Head Over Heels”
“Maggie Simpson In the Longest Daycare”

Best Live-Action Short Film
WINNER: “Curfew”
“Asad”
“Buzkashi Boys”
“Death of a Shadow”
“Henry”

Nine Oscar speeches that changed the world

You’re never going to win an Oscar. But whether you’re conscious of it or not, you’ve probably already given an Oscar speech.

They may be the most secretly influential forms of American rhetoric. The rhythms and tropes of wealthy filmmakers accepting career-peak trophies echo in every weepy retirement speech, every smug valedictorian address, every comic icebreaker the CEO uses to kick off his PowerPoint presentation. Movie stars show us how to kiss, how to dress. Of course we learn public discourse from them,  too. Read more here: http://wapo.st/XLTATs

Here are 9 speeches that changed the world by Amy Argetsinger from washingtonpost.com

Actress Sally Field accepts her Academy Award for best actress in the film "Places in the Heart" at the Oscar ceremonies in Los Angeles March 26, 1985. (AP)

Actress Sally Field accepts her Academy Award for best actress in the film “Places in the Heart” at the Oscar ceremonies in Los Angeles March 26, 1985. (AP)

“You know what you want to say, you want to be grounded, be yourself, be totally honest about how you’re feeling,” says Roger Ross Williams, recalling his 2010 Oscar moment. Not ringing a bell? More on him later, as we recall nine landmark Oscar speeches and their legacies.

Greer Garson: Her acceptance of the 1942 Best Actress prize (for “Mrs. Miniver”) is legendary as the longest in show history — an estimated seven minutes — but it also set the pace for gassy self-regard. The British star pontificated on the meaning of awards, her journey to the U.S., the marvelous support Hollywood was getting from the troops.Legacies: Time limits. Self-mythologizing stars (Halle Berry: “this moment is so much bigger than me”; Hilary Swank: “just a little girl from a trailer park with a dream”). RNC speeches that barely mention the nominee. The worst banquets you’ve ever attended.

Ed Begley: The veteran character actor, winning the 1962 Best Supporting Actor for “Sweet Bird of Youth,” thanked his producer, his director…“but most of all, and this is from the heart, my agent, George Morris.” The room was shocked. This was a first! “Really and truly!” the actor protested, explaining that Morris worked overtime to get him the role.Legacies: Thanking your agent, your publicist, your hairdresser. Taking your bifocals and a folded list onstage with you. (“Titanic” producer Jon Landau name-checked 55 people.) Four-page author acknowledgements. Watch the speech.

Marlon Brando: The eccentric “Godfather” star skipped the 1972 ceremony and sent “Sacheen Littlefeather” (actress-activist Marie Cruz) to refuse his Best Actor prize — in protest, she said, of “the treatment of American Indians” by Hollywood and the government. A political statement? Whatever. It was really the birth of Punk’d culture.Legacies: Five-second delays. Howard Stern fans crank-calling live news broadcasts. Sacha Baron-Cohen’s career. Kanye West interrupting Taylor Swift.

Louise Fletcher: The Best Actress winner for “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975) kept it short, gracious and barely memorable — until she completed her speech in sign language to thank her deaf parents “for teaching me to have a dream. You are seeing my dream come true.” Nothing like a good awards-show cry. Legacies: Cambodian refu­gee Haing S. Ngor’s win (“this is unbelievable, but so is my entire life”). Timothy Hutton’s shout-out to his late dad Jim Hutton. Ving Rhames regifting his Golden Globe to his hero Jack Lemmon. The very best rehearsal-dinner toasts.

Vanessa Redgrave: What was more shocking: When the Palestine advocate and Best Supporting Actress of 1977 (“Julia”) thanked the academy for standing up to “Zionist hoodlums” who opposed her? Or the hisses from the audience and subsequent scolding from presenter Paddy Chayefsky? Legacies: Susan Sarandon, Tim Robbins and Richard Gere getting in trouble for mouthing off about politics at the podium. Michael Moore calling out the president (“we are against this war, Mr. Bush!”) and getting booed. Rep. Joe Wilson’s State of the Union heckle (“you lie!”). Cable news warfare in general.

Meryl Streep: Everyone knew she would win Best Supporting Actress for 1979’s “Kramer Vs. Kramer,”  but she politely acted surprised: “Holy mackerel!” Cute, unconvincing and soon the new standard. Legacies: All of Kate Winslet’s faux-shocked acceptance speeches. Kooky, self-deprecating opening lines. (Admiral James Stockdale, vice-presidential debate of 1992: “Who am I? Why am I here?”) Later and better Streep speeches, eventually honed to a fine art.

Sally Field: What she actually said, accepting the 1984 Best Actress prize: “And I can’t deny the fact that you like me. Right now, you like me!” What it meant: A subtle reference to a line from her 1979 movie “Norma Rae.” What it turned into: The single most quoted, imitated, joked-about moment from the Oscars, ever. Legacies: Director James Cameron’s “Titanic” acceptance (“I’m king of the world!”). Meme culture. The pressure to make a funny joke on Twitter about what just happened on TV.

Jack Palance: Exulting in his 1991 Best Supporting Actor trophy (“City Slickers”), the 73-year-old dropped to the floor and did three one-armed push-ups. Legacies: Roberto Benigni climbing over the seats to accept his Best Actor prize. Adrian Brody soul-kissing Halle Berry to accept his. Obnoxious end-zone dances.

Roger Ross WilliamsRemember? He’s the 2009 Best Documentary Short director whose carefully planned speech was cut short when estranged producer Elinor Burkett rushed the stage. “Everyone was talking about it the next day,” he marvels. Legacies: A “Larry King” guest spot, a “Simpsons” parody, a “Letterman” skit, a coveted Sundance spot for “God Loves Uganda,” his new full-length documentary. Williams laughs about it now: “That attention helped my career in a big way.”

 

There are essentially four possible narratives that could unfold.
1) “Argo” continues its general awards sweep.
2) The Weinsteins‘ campaigning pays off in spades, and “Silver Linings Playbook” sweeps.
3) “Lincoln” takes Best Picture, Director and Actor, being deemed the most “important” of the nominees.
4) Everyone’s been underestimating “Life Of Pi,” and it surprises with the top prize.
Winners prediction are in bold. Read more here: http://bit.ly/XBMroJ
1. “Inocente” 2. “Mondays At Racine” 3. “Open Heart” 4. “Redemption” 5. “Kings Point”
1. “Curfew” 2. “Death Of A Shadow’ 3. “Asad” 4. “Buzkashi Boys” 5. “Henry”
 
1. “Paperman 2. “Adam And Dog” 3. “Head Over Heels” 4. “Fresh Guacamole” 5. “The Longest Daycare”
1. “Skyfall” 2. “Life Of Pi” 3. “Argo” 4. “Zero Dark Thirty” 5. “Django Unchained
1. “Les Miserables 2. “Skyfall” 3. “Argo” 4. “Life Of PI” 5. “Lincoln”

Best Make-Up and Hairstyling

1. “Les Miserables”
3. “Hitchcock”
Best Visual Effects
1. “Life Of Pi”
2. “Marvel’s The Avengers”
3. “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey”
4. “Promethus”
5. “Snow White and the Hunstman”
1. “Skyfall” from “Skyfall” – Adele Adkins and Paul Epworth
2. “Suddenly” from “Les Miserables” – Claude-Michel Schonberg, Herbert Kretzmer and Alain Boubil
3. “Before My Time” from “Chasing Ice” – J. Ralph 4. “Everybody Needs A Best Friend” from “Ted” – Walter Murphy and Seth MacFarlane 5. “Pi’s Lullaby” from “Life of Pi” – Mychael Danna and Bombay Jayashri
Best Original Score
1. “Life of Pi” – Mychael Danna
2. “Skyfall” – Thomas Newman
3. “Argo”  – Alexandre Desplat
4. “Lincoln” – John Williams
5. “Anna Karenina” – Dario Marianelli
Best Production Design

1. “Anna Karenina” – Sarah Greenwood and Katie Spencer
2. “Life Of Pi” – David Gropman and Anna Pinnock
3. “The Hobbit; An Unexpected Journey” – Dan Hennah, Ra Vincent, Simon Bright
4. “Les Miserables” – Eve Stewart and Anna Lynch-Robinson
5. “Lincoln” – Rick Carter, Jim Erickson

Best Costume Design

1. “Anna Karenina” – Jacqueline Durran
2. “Mirror Mirror” – Eiko Ishioka
3. “Snow White and the Huntsman” – Colleen Atwood
4. “Lincoln” – Joanna Johnston
5. “Les Miserables” – Paco Delgado

Best Film Editing

1. “Argo” – William Goldenberg
2. “Zero Dark Thirty” – Dylan Tichenor and William Goldenberg
3. “Life Of Pi” – Tim Squyres
4. “Lincoln” – Michael Kahn
5. “Silver Linings Playbook” – Jay Cassidy and Crispin Struthers

Best Cinematography

1. “Life Of Pi” – Claudio Miranda
2. “Skyfall” – Roger Deakins
3. “Anna Karenina” – Seamus McGarvey
4. “Lincoln” – Janusz Kaminski
5. “Django Unchained” – Robert Richardson

Best Animated Feature

1. “Brave”
2. “Frankenweenie”
3. “Wreck-It Ralph”
4. “ParaNorman
5. “The Pirates! Band Of Misfits”

Best Documentary – Feature

1. “Searching For Sugar Man”
2. “The Gatekeepers”
3. “How To Survive A Plague”
4. “5 Broken Cameras”
5. “The Invisible War”

Best Foreign Language Film

1. “Kon-Tiki”
2. “Amour”
3. “A Royal Affair”
4. “No”
5. “War Witch”

Best Writing – Adapted Screenplay
1. “Argo” – Chris Terrio
2. “Silver Linings Playbook” – David O. Russell
3. “Lincoln” – Tony Kushner
4. “Life Of Pi” – David Magee
5. “Beasts of the Southern Wild” – Lucy Alibar & Benh Zeitlin
Best Writing – Original Screenplay
1. “Zero Dark Thirty” – Mark Boal
2. “Django Unchained” – Quentin Tarantino
3. “Amour” – Michael Haneke
4. “Moonrise Kingdom” – Wes Anderson and Roman Coppola
5. “Flight” – John Gatins
Best Supporting Actor
1. Robert De Niro – “Silver Linings Playbook”
2. Christoph Waltz – “Django Unchained”
3. Tommy Lee Jones – “Lincoln”
4. Philip Seymour Hoffman – “The Master”
5. Alan Arkin – “Argo”
Best Supporting Actress
1. Anne Hathaway – “Les Miserables”
2. Sally Field – “Lincoln”
3. Amy Adams – “The Master”
4. Helen Hunt – “The Sessions”
5. Jacki Weaver – “Silver Linings Playbook”
Best Actor
1. Daniel Day-Lewis – “Lincoln”
2. Joaquin Phoenix – “The Master”
3. Hugh Jackman – “Les Miserables”
4. Bradley Cooper – “Silver Linings Playbook”
5. Denzel Washington – “Flight”
Best Actress 
1. Emmanuelle Riva – “Amour”
2. Jennifer Lawrence – “Silver Linings Playbook”
3. Jessica Chastain – “Zero Dark Thirty”
4. Naomi Watts – “The Impossible”
5. Quvenzhane Wallis – “Beasts of the Southern Wild”
Best Director
1. Ang Lee – “Life Of Pi”
2. Steven Spielberg – “Lincoln”
3. Michael Haneke – “Amour”
4. David O Russell – “Silver Linings Playbook”
5. Benh Zeitlin – “Beasts of the Southern Wild”
Best Picture
1. “Argo”
2. “Silver Linings Playbook”
3. “Life Of Pi”
4 “Lincoln”
5. “Zero Dark Thirty”
6. “Amour”
7. “Les Miserables”
8. “Django Unchained”
9. “Beasts of the Southern Wild”

 

 

 

_oscar

Beverly Hills, CA – Academy Award® winners Jennifer Hudson, Catherine Zeta-Jones and Russell Crowe join this year’s Oscar® nominees Hugh Jackman and Anne Hathaway along with Amanda Seyfried, Eddie Redmayne, Aaron Tveit, Samantha Barks, and Helena Bonham Carter in a celebration honoring movie musicals of the last decade, show producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron announced today.

“We are pleased to have been able to amass so much talent to create the celebration of musicals of the last decade that we envisioned,” said Craig Zadan and Neil Meron.  “We are thrilled that so many talented actors have agreed to bring our vision to life.”

Earlier this month, the producers announced a planned tribute recognizing the resurgence of musicals over the past decade with performances highlighting “Chicago,” “Dreamgirls” and “Les Misérables.”

Hudson, Zeta-Jones, Jackman, Hathaway, Crowe, Seyfried, Redmayne, Barks, Tveit and Bonham Carter join a stellar list of previously announced performers including Adele, Dame Shirley Bassey, Norah Jones and Barbra Streisand and presenters including Jennifer Aniston, Michael Douglas, Jamie Foxx, Paul Rudd, Salma Hayek Pinault, Melissa McCarthy, Liam Neeson, John Travolta, Ben Affleck, Jessica Chastain, Jennifer Lawrence, Halle Berry, Sandra Bullock, Nicole Kidman, Reese Witherspoon, Mark Wahlberg, Ted and “Marvel’s The Avengers” cast members Robert Downey Jr., Samuel L. Jackson, Chris Evans, Jeremy Renner and Mark Ruffalo; returning 2011 Oscar winners Jean Dujardin, Christopher Plummer, Octavia Spencer and Meryl Streep; “Chicago” cast members Richard Gere, Queen Latifah, Renée Zellweger and Zeta-Jones; and special guests Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Daniel Radcliffe, Channing Tatum and Charlize Theron.

Oscars for outstanding film achievements of 2012 will be presented on Oscar® Sunday, February 24, at the Dolby Theatre™ at Hollywood & Highland Center®, and will be hosted by Seth MacFarlane live on the ABC Television Network.  The Oscar presentation also will be televised live in more than 225 countries worldwide. For more information go to Oscar.com or download the official Oscars app.

source: oscars.org

Argo, Zero Dark Thirty and Searching for Sugar Man have scooped the top screenplay honours from the Writers Guild of America.

The adapted screenplay award went to Argo writer Chris Terrio. The film, directed by Ben Affleck, is based on the 1980 CIA operation to extract six US personnel out of revolutionary Iran.

Terrio based his screenplay on The Master of Disguise, a book written by Antonio J Mendez on whom Affleck’s lead character is based, and Wired magazine article The Great Escape by Joshuah Bearman.

It beat competition from the writers of Life of Pi, Lincoln, The Perks of Being a Wallflower and Silver Linings Playbook.

It adds to Argo’s awards haul, which includes trophies for best film and director at both the BAFTAs and Golden Globes, and builds momentum for the Academy Awards, where the film has garnered seven nominations.

Zero Dark Thirty writer, Mark Boal, picked up the original screenplay prize at the awards, which were unveiled simultaneously at ceremonies on Sunday night (Feb 17) held by the WGA West in Los Angeles and WGA East in New York City.

The film, about the hunt for Osama bin Laden, beat nominees for Flight, Looper, The Master and Moonrise Kingdom.

In addition, Searching for Sugar Man saw Malik Bendjelloul win for best documentary screenplay. Read more for Michael Rosser’s review here: http://bit.ly/Za4gv3

%d bloggers like this: