Tag Archive: zero dark thirty


Argo, Zero Dark Thirty and Searching for Sugar Man have scooped the top screenplay honours from the Writers Guild of America.

The adapted screenplay award went to Argo writer Chris Terrio. The film, directed by Ben Affleck, is based on the 1980 CIA operation to extract six US personnel out of revolutionary Iran.

Terrio based his screenplay on The Master of Disguise, a book written by Antonio J Mendez on whom Affleck’s lead character is based, and Wired magazine article The Great Escape by Joshuah Bearman.

It beat competition from the writers of Life of Pi, Lincoln, The Perks of Being a Wallflower and Silver Linings Playbook.

It adds to Argo’s awards haul, which includes trophies for best film and director at both the BAFTAs and Golden Globes, and builds momentum for the Academy Awards, where the film has garnered seven nominations.

Zero Dark Thirty writer, Mark Boal, picked up the original screenplay prize at the awards, which were unveiled simultaneously at ceremonies on Sunday night (Feb 17) held by the WGA West in Los Angeles and WGA East in New York City.

The film, about the hunt for Osama bin Laden, beat nominees for Flight, Looper, The Master and Moonrise Kingdom.

In addition, Searching for Sugar Man saw Malik Bendjelloul win for best documentary screenplay. Read more for Michael Rosser’s review here: http://bit.ly/Za4gv3

_golden_globes_best_picture

Could it be that the Golden Globes actually have better taste than the Oscars? After all, Globe voters this year found room for critically lauded performances by Marion Cotillard (“Rust and Bone”), Rachel Weisz (“The Deep Blue Sea”), John Hawkes (“The Sessions”) and Richard Gere (“Arbitrage”) that the Academy voters overlooked. And the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (the group that picks the Globes) had the sense to nominate Kathryn Bigelow (“Zero Dark Thirty”) and credit the Globes’ unique practice of expanding the field by breaking out a separate Comedy/Musical category, as well as the idiosyncratic makeup of the HFPA (a small group of about 100 entertainment journalists, contrasted with the Academy’s 6,000 or so movie-industry professionals).

The result, however, is a slate that — this year, at least — matches up only roughly with the Oscar nominees list, making the predictive value of the Globes more dubious than usual. And vice versa; you can’t predict the Globes by guessing how the Academy would vote.

Still, judging by what the HFPA voters like — movies and performers with international appeal, classical Hollywood filmmaking, and familiar faces who’ll brighten their televised cocktail party — it’s not hard to guess which stars and movies will win when the trophies are handed out on Jan. 13. Here’s a cheat sheet for your home ballot.

BEST MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA
“Argo”
“Django Unchained”
“Life of Pi”
“Lincoln”
“Zero Dark Thirty”

In the night’s most important race (since it’s the most predictive of Oscar’s Best Picture category), where the Academy gave us a wide-open race among nine worthy contenders, the HFPA gives us essentially a two-horse competition between “Lincoln” and “Zero Dark Thirty”; the rest will be also-rans. “Lincoln” has the edge as a piece of classical filmmaking from Hollywood’s biggest brand-name director, but “Zero Dark Thirty” seems to have most of the awards momentum this season and is likely to squeak past.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA
Jessica Chastain (“Zero Dark Thirty”)
Marion Cotillard (“Rust and Bone”)
Helen Mirren (“Hitchcock”)
Naomi Watts (“The Impossible”)
Rachel Weisz (“The Deep Blue Sea”)

Just because I praised the Globe voters above for recognizing several of these performances that Academy members passed over doesn’t mean I don’t think that in the end, the HFPA will still go for Chastain, the hot rising star of the past couple years. For the rest, it’s just an honor to be nominated, though out of all of these, Cotillard or Watts could manage an upset for playing women in umimaginably extreme circumstances.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

Daniel Day-Lewis (“Lincoln”)
Richard Gere (“Arbitrage”)
John Hawkes (“The Sessions”)
Joaquin Phoenix (“The Master”)
Denzel Washington (“Flight”)

As with the actresses, Gere and Hawkes should be grateful just to have been invited. As much I’d love to see Phoenix win just to here what kind of gonzo acceptance speech the awards-averse actor would give, and tho i love more him more as Daniel Plainview but this race belongs to Day-Lewis, surely. Enough said.

BEST MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel
“Les Miserables”
“Moonrise Kingdom”
“Salmon Fishing in the Yemen”
“Silver Linings Playbook”

“Marigold” and “Yemen” are the kind of multinational comedies with older-audience appeal that hit the HFPA’s demographic sweet spot, and “Playbook” has buzz, but the smash “Les Mis” will take the category. Russel Crowe has a band, he’s the vocalist. Hugh Jackman i once saw him sang with Richard Marx. Anne Hathaway, oh boy, she’s not that bad at singing.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL
Emily Blunt (“Salmon Fishing in the Yemen”)
Judi Dench (“The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel”)
Jennifer Lawrence (“Silver Linings Playbook”)
Maggie Smith (“Quartet”)
Meryl Streep (“Hope Springs”)

Enough with Meryl Streep. I love Jen but Katniss Everdeen (who happens to be the only person in this category who also got an Oscar nod) is going to hit the bullseye on this target.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL
Jack Black (“Bernie”)
Bradley Cooper (“Silver Linings Playbook”)
Hugh Jackman (“Les Miserables”)
Ewan McGregor (“Salmon Fishing in the Yemen”)
Bill Murray (“Hyde Park on Hudson”)

It’s great that the HFPA are recognizing the Oscar-snubbed performances of Black, McGregor and Murray, but the race is between Cooper and Jackman. Cooper’s terrific in “Playbook,” but i will go with Dave Mustaine of Megadeth on this one Jackman’s titanic Jean Valjean in “Les Miz” is going to carry this one.

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM
“Brave”
“Frankenweenie”
“Hotel Transylvania”
“Rise of the Guardians”
“Wreck-It Ralph”

It’s either “Frankenweenie” or “Brave”. Sorry Burton, but when it comes to Pixar i have to be brave on choosing “Brave”.

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
“Amour”
“A Royal Affair”
“The Intouchables”
“Kon-Tiki”
“Rust and Bone”

I am wondering why HFPA snubbed Emmanuelle Riva. She’s my fave on Best Actress category on Oscar next February. Maybe “Amour” was categorized in Foreign Languange Film. I don’t know. But “Amour” it is. In the name of love.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

Amy Adams (“The Master”)
Sally Field (“Lincoln”)
Anne Hathaway (“Les Miserables”)
Helen Hunt (“The Sessions”)
Nicole Kidman (“The Paperboy”)

You were good Mrs. Lincoln but no offense this prize belongs to the heart-rending Hathaway of “Les Mis.” She deserves it more.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE
Alan Arkin (“Argo”)
Leonardo DiCaprio (“Django Unchained”)
Philip Seymour Hoffman (“The Master”)
Tommy Lee Jones (“Lincoln”)
Christoph Waltz (“Django Unchained”)

This may be the toughest Globe race to call. DiCaprio? Hmm.. Not now amigo.  Waltz? You’re not Hans Landa this time. Arkin? Nope. It’s two horse race between Hoffman and Jones. Hoffman’s best role was at “Capote”. So i’ll go with Tommy Lee Jones though i hate the wig.

BEST DIRECTOR – MOTION PICTURE
Ben Affleck (“Argo”)
Kathryn Bigelow (“Zero Dark Thirty”)
Ang Lee (“Life of Pi”)
Steven Spielberg (“Lincoln”)
Quentin Tarantino (“Django Unchained”)

It’s really between Spielberg and Bigelow. It’s political thingy. “Lincoln” is not my fave Spielberg’s  movie. “Schindler’s List” or “Saving Private Ryan” attracted me more. But who has bigger role in America history? Abe or Osama? Yes i’ll go with Spielberg.

BEST SCREENPLAY – MOTION PICTURE
Mark Boal (“Zero Dark Thirty”)
Tony Kushner (“Lincoln”)
David O. Russell (“Silver Linings Playbook”)
Quentin Tarantino (“Django Unchained”)
Chris Terrio (“Argo”)

Again, it’s a battle between “Zero Dark Thirty” and “Lincoln.” Again i’ll go with Kusner’s “Lincoln”

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE – MOTION PICTURE
Mychael Danna (“Life of Pi”)
Alexandre Desplat (“Argo”)
Dario Marianelli (“Anna Karenina”)
Tom Tykwer, Johnny Klimek, Reinhold Heil (“Cloud Atlas”)
John Williams (“Lincoln”)

I’m a fan of Alexandre Desplat. But it’s not his year. It’s either John Williams or Mychael Danna. His scoring is my lullaby. Me easily get carried away. Eversince “The Imaginarium of Dr Parnassus”, you have my vote Mr. Danna!

BEST ORIGINAL SONG – MOTION PICTURE
“For You” from “Act of Valor” (Monty Powell, Keith Urban)
“Not Running Anymore” from “Stand Up Guys” (Jon Bon Jovi)
“Safe & Sound” from “The Hunger Games” (Taylor Swift, John Paul White, Joy Williams, T Bone Burnett)
“Skyfall” from “Skyfall” (Adele, Paul Epworth)
“Suddenly” from “Les Miserables” (Claude-Michel Schonberg, Alain Boublil, Herbert Kretzmer)

In celebrating 50 years the James Bond franchise, well it’s not James Bond’s best song. Garbage and Carly Simon still top on my list. But  Adele still probably gets it, so “Skyfall” it is.

Well after all. It’s just a prediction. I may be wrong. But at least more than 30% of my predictions are gonna get along with HFPA. So place your bet before it’s too late.

— image from screencrush.com some words taken from moviefone.com

Quvenzhane Wallis
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences made history Thursday nominating both the oldest — Emmanuelle Riva, 85, in “Amour” — and the youngest –Quvenzhane Wallis, 9, in “Beasts of the Southern Wild” — actresses in the best actress category.
_amour_t614
The two will compete against Naomi Watts for her role in“The Impossible,” Jessica Chastain for “Zero Dark Thirty”and Jennifer Lawrence for “Silver Linings Playbook.” Wallis, who shot the part when she was only 6, had never acted before starring in Benh Zeitlin’s tale of life in the Bayou, while Riva has been at her craft since 1958. Both are nominated for the first time.
Yet they are up against three actresses, all with previous nominations to their name. Chastain was an unknown two years ago, yet today marks the 35-year old actress’s second nomination in two years for her lead role as CIA analyst Maya in Kathryn Bigelow‘s drama“Zero Dark Thirty.” (She was nominated last year for a supporting role in “The Help.”) Lawrence, 22, is also an over-achiever, landing her second nomination Thursday morning for her role as a neurotic young widow in David O. Russell‘s romantic dramedy. Her first nomination was for 2010’s “Winter’s Bone.” She was named best actress by the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn. and is nominated for both a Golden Globe and SAG Award. Lawrence is vowing to have a better time this year then in 2011, when the pressure of the night and the events leading up to the show led her call it quits on Oscar night by 10:30. “I was already in bed by then,” she said.
It should help that her castmates Bradley Cooper, Jackie Weaver and Robert DeNiro will all be on hand as fellow nominees to help her celebrate. “I have a feeling that no one will allow me to do that this time around,” said Lawrence, who admitted feeling overwhelmed by both the fashion stress and the red carpet interviews. “There is so much pressure that last time I didn’t enjoy it so much. This time I’m going to not let there be too much pressure and just have fun.” Naomi Watts, 44, was nominated for her part in Juan Antonio Bayona’s harrowing disaster tale “The Impossible.” The actress, 44, previously was nominated for the 2003 drama “21 Grams.” She’s also nominated this year for a Golden Globe and SAG Award.
The news is sweet for Watts, who watched the nominations on TV even though she vowed she wouldn’t for fear of being disappointed. While she wishes more of the cast and filmmakers from “The Impossible” were recognized for their work, she was thrilled to receive well wishes from them Thursday morning–and to specifically receive an email from Maria Belon, the real-life woman on whom her role was based. “She wrote something, like she always does, that made me cry,” said Watts. “It’s the message I was waiting for.” Watts is going to try to approach the remainder of the season with the same attitude she believes Belon would. “I feel so connected to this movie and to Maria and her story,” she added. “She would enjoy it. She’s someone that has such a joy of life. I’m always trying to take a page out of her book.” Last year, Viola Davis (“The Help”) and Meryl Streep (“The Iron Lady”) went head to head throughout the Oscar season with Streep taking home the ultimate prize, for the first time in 29 years. The 85th Academy Awards will take place Feb. 24 at Hollywood’s Dolby Theatre.
— article written by nicole sperling for latimes.com riva’s image from telegraph.co.uk

 

_amour
Michael Haneke‘s “Amour,” which won the Palme d’Or last May at Cannes, was voted Saturday the best film of 2012 by the prestigious National Society of Film Critics. The award, coming on the eve of voting for the 2013 Academy Awards, confirms “Amour” as a Best Foreign Film frontrunner. Other NSFC winners will also draw welcome attention.

Daniel Day-Lewis was voted the year’s best actor for his work in the title role of “Lincoln.” The veteran French actress Emmanuelle Riva, 85, won for Best Actress for “Amour,” in which she-costarred with another legend, Jean-LouisTrintignant, 82, in Haneke’s story of a long-married and happy couple whose life is interrupted by illness.

Amy Adams and Matthew McConaughey were semi-unexpected but deserving winners in the supporting categories. McConaughey played the enterprising star of his own male stripper revue in Tampa in “Magic Mike.” Adams was the wife of a cult leader said to be inspired by the Scientologist L. Ron Hubbard in “The Master.”

Runners-up in the best actress category were Jennifer Lawrence for “Silver Linings Playbook” and Jessica Chastain for “Zero Dark Thirty.” In the supporting actor category, second- and third-place finishers were Tommy Lee Jones for “Lincoln” and Philip Seymour Hoffman for “The Master.”

Unlike the Oscars, the NSFC reveals its actual vote totals. The top three films were “Amour” with 28, “The Master” with 25, and “Zero Dark Thirty” with 18. The diectors of those three, shuffled slightly, finished this way: Haneke with 27, and Kathryn Bigelow and Paul Thomas Anderson, both with 24.

The year’s best documentary film was “The Gatekeepers,” focusing on the surviving chiefs of Shin Bet, the Israeli security agency. Runners-Up: “This Is Not a Film,” by Iranian filmmake Jafar Panahi, who was banned from working and “made” a film directed by others about how he wasn’t making one. “Searching for Sugar Man,” the incredible story of a 1970s rock star named Rodriguez who was forgotten in this country but became a superstar in far-away South Africa. “This is Not a Film” was also named Best Experimental Film.

Tony Kushner’s sript for “Lincoln” won in Best Screenplay category, followed by P. T. Anderson‘s for “The Master” and David O. Russell‘s for “Silver Linnings Playbook.”

Honored for their cinematography: Mihai Malaimare, Jr. for “The Master,” Roger Deakins for the James Bond adventure “Skyfall,” and Greig Fraser for “Zero Dark Thirty.”

On a sentimental note, this year’s awards were dedicated to one of the Society’s founders, the great Andrew Sarris, who died June 20, 2012. Originally formed as an alternative to the New York Film Critics’ Circle, which was deemed too mainstream, the Society is considered more highbrow and exclusive than many other awards groups.

–written by roger ebert. taken from rogerebert.suntimes.com. image from telegraph.co.uk

Roger Ebert Names ‘Argo’ As The Best Movie Of 2012

While there have been many, many 2012 lists and recaps, the year isn’t over until Roger Ebert weighs in with his favorites, and today he’s done so, dropping his list of the best movies he saw in 2012. And as usual, it’s a mix of more popular choices, with some love shown to smaller, foreign films that might not get the shine otherwise.
Ben Affleck‘s “Argo” got the top shelf slot from Roger, with auteurs generally ruling the roost, with Ang Lee,Steven Spielberg and Robert Zemeckis all getting their films onto the top ten. Indie faves “Arbitrage,” “The Sessions” and “Beasts Of The Southern Wild” also ranked, but what will stand out most are the ninth and tenth slots. Joachim Trier‘s patient and melancholy “Oslo, August 31” gets some love from Ebert, as does “A Simple Life,” the film by Ann Hui that is Hong Kong’s official selection for the Oscars this year. It didn’t make the shortlist, but consider its profile raised considerably. And yes, he saw “Zero Dark Thirty,” but he didn’t fall in with the rest of the critics who put it at the top of their list.

Here’s Roger’s ten movies below, but hit his blog to get this thoughts on all of them. And our best wishes to Roger for a full recovery after recently suffering a hip fracture.

Roger Ebert’s Top Movies Of 2012

1. Argo
2. Life Of Pi
3. Lincoln
4. End Of Watch
5. Arbitrage
6. Flight
7. The Sessions
8. Beasts Of The Southern Wild
9. Oslo, August 31
10. A Simple Life

— made by kevin jaggernauth for blogs.indiewire.com

 

The Best Movie Posters of 2012

_Rust-and-Bone

“Don’t Judge a Book by Its Cover” is a proverb whose simple existence proves the fact impressionable souls will do so without fail. This monthly column (with a special year-end retrospective today) focuses on the film industry’s willingness to capitalize on this truth, releasing one-sheets to serve as not representations of what audiences are to expect, but as propaganda to fill seats. Oftentimes they fail miserably.

Another year is complete and the time has come to revisit the best one-sheets that did all they could to help their films achieve box office glory. Unsurprising to those of you who been following the Posterized Propaganda series all year, most of the ones I’ve singled out are teasers. Frankly, marketing firms find themselves freer to take chances and really toy with our perceptions before knowing too many details about the finished piece.

Compositions rule the day alongside carefully placed typography and a fearless desire to play with aesthetic and the medium by exceeding their constraints. Print is inherently flat as it handcuffs designers into a preordained space with regulated text. The following firms thankfully continue to find ways to ignore the rules and give us work that doesn’t hit us over the head or treat us like Kindergarteners.

Honorable Mentions

Les Misérables Moonrise Kingdom This is Forty Compliance Safety Not Guaranteed
#15
Les Misérables
Ignition Print
.
#14
Moonrise Kingdom
P+A
#13
This is 40
The Cimarron Group
#12
Compliance
.
.
#11
Safety Not Guaranteed
.

Here #10
Here
Ignition Print
I remember loving this poster when it came out a few months ago as Ignition really went all out rotating the page 90 degrees clockwise soBen Foster and Lubna Azabal can be anchored at left. It’s a brilliant way to transform a horizontal image vertical and the beige field of sky is a perfect blank slate for the pertinent production text to hover atop. Add in the authentic, map-like paper folds and you really do get a sense of the title’s Here being used as a destination. But instead of a place for these lovers to look towards, the location they seek is anywhere they can be together.

Rust and Bone #09
Rust and Bone
The Rageman
I know the scrawled text over image trope is a bit overused these days, but I can’t help feel it enhances the fragility this still of Marion Cotillardand Matthias Schoenaerts emits. It along with the distressed, faded edges of scratches and folds add age to the image as well as character. We’re only seeing a small portion of the two before they continue out of frame, her expression projecting a sense of trepidation and a strengthening trust. The film is called Rust and Bone, but the poster is all about flesh and emotion.

The Loneliest Planet #08
The Loneliest Planet
Perhaps my inclusion of The Loneliest Planet makes it seem as though turned pages are presently my motif of choice, but this sheet truly captivates. Not only do the heads of Gael García Bernal and Hani Furstenberg perfectly bisect the page vertical, they also meet at the horizon line of the poster’s alternate image’s mountain landscape on which our actors hike along. It’s a gorgeous expanse of desert dunes filtered through a green marble juxtaposed against the colorful faces of the film’s stars. Forcing the crisp san serif text within a thinner vertical band only helps keep our attention constantly shifting from side to side to up and down.

Deepsouth #07
Deepsouth
Brian O’Dell
Honestly, I don’t care if Brian O’Dell‘s poster for Deepsouth should or shouldn’t be on this list when release schedule and notoriety are brought into question because it is a stunning piece of art notwithstanding. I love the delicate, lowercase Courier-like font with a not-so-subtle red cross serving as its “t” pushed down to the bottom of the page so our gaze can wind our way through the upside down tree’s barren branches. Is it a depiction of lungs? Is it a representation of a family tree stretching out wide? It’s beautiful in a purely formal aesthetic way—that’s what it is.

The Cabin in the Woods #06
The Cabin in the Woods
Phantom City Creative
The surprise film of the year—for the studio who shelved it two years, not the fans who knew they’d love it—The Cabin in the Woods was ripe for Mondo Tees to print a limited edition art run. Thanks to Phantom City Creative, the result is everything we could have hoped. Playing with the genre-bending, multi-level plot structure and set of the film, this homage to M.C. Escher‘s Relativity perfectly encapsulates what Drew Goddardand Joss Whedon created. Handdrawn and meticulously detailed to even include the honeycomb pattern its science fiction side utilized, it’s a breathtaking rendering.

Wreck-It Ralph #05
Wreck-It Ralph
How great is it that Disney made a film with 8-bit-like characters stuttering around the screen let alone had the courage to tease it with its fully pixelated lead character to children who have never played a game that didn’t include three-dimensionally rendered worlds? Ever since I saw Wreck-It Ralph‘s angry face in theater poster frames I knew I had to see the film whether it would be all 8-bit or not. The Mouse House went full bore into nostalgia for this one and it played huge with people my age—the same money-earners now spawning the studio’s key demographic clamoring for cartoons and popcorn.

Sound of My Voice #04
Sound of My Voice
Having now seen Sound of My Voice, it’s poster somehow still possesses much of the same intrigue it had upon release. The image is an eerie one with a white, shrouded Brit Marling about to uncover her face as oxygen tubes wrap down around her nose. I wrote earlier in the year that it had an other-worldly, Matthew Barney feel projecting a sort of alien filter to her character. Knowing her secret now only bolsters this comparison. The art direction is spectacular from Marling’s pose to the low contrast delineation between text and image and its muted color palette draws you into the spirals of her gown and will not let go.

The Paperboy #03
The Paperboy
and company
Vintage chic with an off-white tint, and company effectively recreatesThe Paperboy‘s 70s era. The thick, stylized font weighs down the sheet as the painterly, air brushed imagery helps its high contrast photos lighten in an almost pastel hue. Having the car door not run parallel to the page’s edge gives it just enough of a slant to create that gorgeously shadowed triangle above the second widescreen cell of John Cusack‘s menacing glare and you can’t ask for better depth of field where its trio of actors in the main frame are concerned. It drips confidence and make me want to ignore all the bad press the film has received.

Zero Dark Thirty #02
Zero Dark Thirty
BLT Communications, LLC
BLT must be applauded for fearlessly covering their advertisement’s main element for recognition. Where most firms would have littered the frame with unnecessary words so it could redact everything but the title, they understood that the power of censorship is in deleting what means the most. They utilize a well-measured marker width perfectly positioned so that enough of each letter is visible to still read the Zero Dark Thirtyand December. Simple and exacting, if there were a scale for efficacy in design this couldn’t get lower than a 98%. It’s a fantastic stand-in for what seems to be the consensus favorite for Oscar season.

The Master #01
The Master
Dustin Stanton
Dustin Stanton’s work for The Master exemplifies what the industry needs to remain fresh—a living, breathing representation of the film. Before anyone knew the plot of Paul Thomas Anderson‘s newest, this impressively manufactured faux bottle of alcohol elicited hypotheses while also piquing interest. The liquid’s surface edge magnifies the word it intersects and the fluid’s murky translucency obscures what’s below. You could almost believe it possible to reach through and touch the polished wall of text behind. Who knew something so flat could be so tactile? And without a floating, Photoshopped head too.

— written by jaredmobarak for thefilmstage.com

African-American Film Critics name ‘Zero Dark Thirty’ best film

1134604 - Zero Dark Thirty
“Zero Dark Thirty,” Kathryn Bigelow‘s chronicle of the search for terrorist Osama bin-Laden, continued its winning ways Sunday evening when it was named best film of 2012 by the African-American Film Critics Association.

The film, which opens Wednesday, has already won best film honors from the New York Film Critics Circle and the National Board of Review, and it received best film nominations last week for the Critics’ Choice Movie Awards and the Golden Globes.

But it was Ava DuVernay‘s drama about how a marriage is affected when the husband goes to prison, “Middle of Nowhere,” that was the big winner Sunday, receiving four awards: actress for Emayatzy Corinealdi, screenplay for DuVernay, independent film and music for Kathryn Bostic & Morgan Rhodes.

THE ENVELOPE: AWARDS 2013

Ben Affleck was named best director for “Argo,” while actor honors went to Denzel Washington for “Flight.” Sally Fieldwas named best supporting actress for “Lincoln,” and Nate Parker earned the supporting actor award for “Arbitrage.”

France’s “The Intouchables” was named best foreign film, while young Quvenzhane Wallis received breakout performance for “Beasts of the Southern Wild.”

Animation honors went to “Rise of the Guardians.” There was a tie for documentary between “The House I Live In” and “Versailles ’73.”

The organization also selected 10 films of distinction for 2012: “Zero Dark Thirty,” “Argo,” “Lincoln,” “Middle of Nowhere,” “Life of Pi,” “Les Miserables,” Django Unchained,” “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” “Moonrise Kingdom” and “Think Like a Man.”

Billy Dee WilliamsCicely Tyson, Clint Culpepper and Rainforest Films were Special Achievement Award recipients.

The African-American Film Critics Assn. will present the awards in a private ceremony Feb. 8 at the Taglyan Complex in Hollywood.

(By Susan King for latimes.com)

 

Hollywood Foreign Press Association, 2013 Golden Globes Announcement

1.    BEST MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

a.    ARGO
Warner Bros. Pictures, GK Films, Smokehouse Pictures; Warner Bros. Pictures

b.    DJANGO UNCHAINED
The Weinstein Company, Columbia Pictures; The Weinstein Company/Sony Pictures Releasing

c.    LIFE OF PI
Fox 2000 Pictures; Twentieth Century Fox

d.    LINCOLN
DreamWorks Pictures, Twentieth Century Fox; Touchstone Pictures

e.    ZERO DARK THIRTY
Columbia Pictures and Annapurna Pictures; Sony Pictures Releasing

2.    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

a.    Jessica Chastain     ZERO DARK THIRTY

b.    Marion Cotillard    RUST AND BONE

c.    Helen Mirren    HITCHCOCK

d.    NAOMI WATTS     THE IMPOSSIBLE

e.    Rachel Weisz     THE DEEP BLUE SEA

3. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

a.    Daniel Day-Lewis     LINCOLN

b.    Richard Gere         ARBITRAGE

c.    JOHN HAWKES         THE SESSIONS

d.    Joaquin Phoenix     THE MASTER

e.    Denzel Washington FLIGHT

4.    BEST MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL
Blueprint Pictures/Participant Media; Fox Searchlight Pictures

b.    LES MISERABLES
Universal Pictures, A Working Title Films/Cameron Mackintosh Productions; Universal Pictures

c.    MOONRISE KINGDOM
Indian Paintbrush; Focus Features

d.    SALMON FISH IN GIN THE YEMEN
CBS Films; CBS Films

e.    SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK
The Weinstein Company; The Weinstein Company

5.    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    Emily Blunt         SALMON FISHING IN THE YEMEN

b.    Judi Dench             THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL

c.    Jennifer Lawrence  SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK

d.    Maggie Smith         QUARTET

e.    Meryl Streep         HOPE SPRINGS

6. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    Jack Black             BERNIE

b.    BRADLEY COOPER     SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK

c.    Hugh Jackman         LES MISERABLES

d.    Ewan McGregor     SALMON FISHING IN THE YEMEN

e.    Bill Murray         HYDE PARK ON HUDSON

7.    BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

a.    BRAVE
Walt Disney Pictures, Pixar Animation Studios; Walt Disney Pictures

b.    FRANKENWEENIE
Walt Disney Pictures; Walt Disney Pictures

c.    HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA
Columbia Pictures / Sony Pictures Animation; Sony Pictures Releasing

d.    RISE OF THE GUARDIANS
DreamWorks Animation LLC; Paramount Pictures

e.    WRECK-IT RALPH
Walt Disney Pictures, Walt Disney Animation Studios; Walt Disney Pictures

8.    BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

a.    AMOUR (AUSTRIA)
Les Films Du Losange, X Filme Creative Pool, Wega Film; Sony Pictures Classics

b.    AROYALAFFAIR (DENMARK)
(En kongelig affære) 
Zentropa Entertainment; Magnolia Pictures

c.    THE INTOUCHABLES (FRANCE)
(Les Intouchables) 
The WeinstenCompany, Quad Productions, Gaumont, TF1 Films Production, Ten Films, Chaocorp; The Weinstein Company

d.    KON-TIKI (NORWAY/UK/DENMARK)
Nordisk Film Production, Recorded Picture Company; The Weinstein Company

e.    RUST AND BONE (FRANCE)
(De rouille et d’os) 
Page 114, Why Not Productions; Sony Pictures Classics

9. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

a.    Amy Adams             THE MASTER

b.    Sally Field             LINCOLN

c.    Anne Hathaway     LES MISERABLES

d.    Helen Hunt         THE SESSIONS

e.    Nicole Kidman         THE PAPERBOY

10. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

a.    Alan Arkin                 ARGO

b.    Leonardo DiCaprio         DJANGO UNCHAINED

c.    Philip Seymour Hoffman  THE MASTER

d.    Tommy Lee Jones          LINCOLN

e.    Christoph Waltz         DJANGO UNCHAINED

11. BEST DIRECTOR – MOTION PICTURE

a.    Ben Affleck             ARGO

b.    Kathryn Bigelow         ZERO DARK THIRTY

c.    Ang Lee                 LIFE OF PI

d.    Steven Spielberg         LINCOLN

e.    Quentin Tarantino         DJANGO UNCHAINED

12. BEST SCREENPLAY – MOTION PICTURE

a.    Mark Boal                 ZERO DARK THIRTY

b.    Tony Kushner             LINCOLN

c.    David O. Russell         SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK

d.    Quentin Tarantino         DJANGO UNCHAINED

e.    CHRIS TERRIO             ARGO

13. BEST ORIGINAL SCORE – MOTION PICTURE

a.    MYCHAEL DANNA         LIFE OF PI

b.    Alexandre Desplat     ARGO

c.    Dario Marianelli         ANNA KARENINA

d.    TOM TYKWER,            CLOUD ATLAS

e.     JOHNNY KLIMEK,

f.    REINHOLD HEIL

g.    John Williams             LINCOLN

14. BEST ORIGINAL SONG – MOTION PICTURE

a.    “FOR YOU” — ACT OF VALOR
Music by: Monty Powell, Keith Urban Lyrics by: Monty Powell, Keith Urban

b.    “NOT RUNNING ANYMORE”—STAND UP GUYS
Music by: Jon Bon Jovi Lyrics by: Jon Bon Jovi

c.    “SAFE & SOUND” — THE HUNGER GAMES
Music by: Taylor Swift, John Paul White, Joy Williams, T Bone Burnett Lyrics by: Taylor Swift, John Paul White, Joy Williams, T Bone Burnett

d.    “SKYFALL”—SKYFALL
Music by: Adele, Paul Epworth Lyrics by: Adele, Paul Epworth

e.    “SUDDENLY” — LES MISERABLES
Music by: Claude-Michel Schonberg
Lyrics by: Alain Boublil, Claude-Michel Schonberg

15. BEST TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

a.    BREAKING BAD
AMC 
Sony Pictures Television

b.    BOARDWALK EMPIRE
HBO 
Leverage, Closest to the Hole Productions, Sikelia Productions and Cold Front Productions in association with HBO Entertainment

c.    DOWNTON ABBEY: SEASON 2
PBS 
A Carnival / Masterpiece Co-Production

d.    HOMELAND
SHOWTIME 
SHOWTIME, Teakwood Lane Productions, Cherry Pie Productions, Keshet, Fox 21

e.    THE NEWSROOM
HBO 
HBO Entertainment

16. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

a.    CONNIE BRITTON                 NASHVILLE

b.    Glenn Close                 DAMAGES

c.    Claire Danes                 HOMELAND

d.    MICHELLE DOCKERY             DOWNTON ABBEY: SEASON 2

e.    Julianna Margulies          THE GOOD WIFE

17. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

a.    Steve Buscemi                 BOARDWALK EMPIRE

b.    Bryan Cranston              BREAKING BAD

c.    Jeff Daniels                 THE NEWSROOM

d.    Jon Hamm                      MAD MEN

e.    Damian Lewis                 HOMELAND

18. BEST TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    THE BIG BANG THEORY
CBS 
Chuck Lorre Productions, Inc. in association with Warner Bros. Television

b.    EPISODES
SHOWTIME 
SHOWTIME, Hat Trick Productions, Crane Klarik Productions

c.    GIRLS
HBO 
Apatow Productions and I am Jenni Konner Productions in association with HBO Entertainment

d.    MODERN FAMILY
ABC 
Levitan-Lloyd Productions in association with Twentieth Century Fox Television

e.    SMASH
NBC

19. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    ZOOEY DESCHANEL                     NEW GIRL

b.    Julia Louis-Dreyfus                 VEEP

c.    LENA DUNHAM                         GIRLS

d.    Tina Fey                                 30 ROCK

e.    Amy Poehler                         PARKS AND RECREATION

20. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    Alec Baldwin                         30 ROCK

b.    Don Cheadle                         HOUSE OF LIES

c.    LOUIS C.K.                             LOUIE

d.    Matt LeBlanc                         EPISODES

e.    Jim Parsons                             THE BIG BANG THEORY

21. BEST MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

a.    GAME CHANGE
HBO 
Playtone and Everyman Pictures in association with HBO Films

b.    THE GIRL
HBO 
A Wall to Wall, Warner Bros Entertainment GmbH, Moonlighting and BBC Production in association with HBO Films

c. HATFIELDS & MCCOYS 
HISTORY Thinkfactory Media in association with History

d.    THE HOUR
BBC AMERICA 
Kudos Film and Television/BBC America co-production

e.    POLITICAL ANIMALS
USA NETWORK Berlanti Productions and Laurence Mark Productions in association with Warner Horizon Television

22. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

a.    Nicole Kidman                     HEMINGWAY & GELLHORN

b.    Jessica Lange                     AMERICAN HORROR STORY: ASYLUM

c.    SIENNA MILLER                     THE GIRL

d.    Julianne Moore                 GAME CHANGE

e.    Sigourney Weaver                  POLITICAL ANIMALS

23. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

a.    Kevin Costner                     HATFIELDS & MCCOYS

b.    BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH              SHERLOCK (MASTERPIECE)

c.    Woody Harrelson                 GAME CHANGE

d.    TOBY JONES                         THE GIRL

e.    Clive Owen                         HEMINGWAY & GELLHORN

24. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

a.    HAYDEN PANETTIERE                 NASHVILLE

b.    ARCHIE PANJABI                     THE GOOD WIFE

c.    Sarah Paulson                     GAME CHANGE

d.    Maggie Smith                     DOWNTON ABBEY: SEASON 2

e.    Sofia Vergara                      MODERN FAMILY

25. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

a.    MAX GREENFIELD                 NEW GIRL

b.    Ed Harris                         GAME CHANGE

c.    DANNY HUSTON                     MAGIC CITY

d.    Mandy Patinkin                 HOMELAND

e.    Eric Stonestreet                 MODERN FAMILY

 

The Critics’ Choice Awards are bestowed annually by the Broadcast Film Critics Association to honor the finest in cinematic achievement. Nominees are selected by written ballots in a week-long voting period, and are announced in December. The winners are revealed at the annual Critics’ Choice Awards ceremony in January. The awards are currently broadcast live on the VH1 television network. The 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009 Awards were at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, the 2010 event—renamed The Critics’ Choice Movie Awards—was held at the refurbished historic Hollywood Palladium on January 15, 2010. Special awards are given out at the discretion of the BFCA Board of Directors.

The Broadcast Film Critics Association prides itself on its ability to anticipate Academy Award nominations: between 1997 and 2004, the Critics’ Choice nominations predicted all but two of 35 Academy Award nominations for Best Picture. By comparison, the Golden Globe Awards were three times more likely to differ during the same period.[citation needed] However, the fact that the BFCA—which typically nominates nine or ten films for Best Film—chooses more than the five nominations of the Academy Awards and Golden Globes may account for some of this greater predictive power. The nominations for the 2013 awards will be announced on December 11, 2012.

The Broadcast Film Critics Association (BFCA) has announced the nominees for the 18th annual Critics’ Choice Movie Awards. The winners will be announced live at the Critics’ Choice Movie Awards ceremony on Thursday, January 10, 2013 from the Barker Hangar in Santa Monica, Calif. The show will broadcast live on The CW Network at 8:00 PM ET/PT.

Lincoln led the way, receiving a record 13 nominations, including Best Picture, while Les Misérables was next with 11, followed by Silver Linings Playbook with 10.

Here is a complete list of our nominees:

BEST PICTURE
Argo
Beasts of the Southern Wild
Django Unchained
Les Miserables
Life of Pi
Lincoln
The Master
Moonrise Kingdom
Silver Linings Playbook
Zero Dark Thirty

BEST ACTOR
Bradley Cooper – Silver Linings Playbook
Daniel Day-Lewis – Lincoln
John Hawkes – The Sessions
Hugh Jackman – Les Miserables
Joaquin Phoenix – The Master
Denzel Washington – Flight

BEST ACTRESS
Jessica Chastain – Zero Dark Thirty
Marion Cotillard – Rust and Bone
Jennifer Lawrence – Silver Linings Playbook
Emmanuelle Riva – Amour
Quvenzhane Wallis – Beasts of the Southern Wild
Naomi Watts – The Impossible

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Alan Arkin – Argo
Javier Bardem – Skyfall
Robert De Niro – Silver Linings Playbook
Philip Seymour Hoffman – The Master
Tommy Lee Jones – Lincoln
Matthew McConaughey – Magic Mike

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Amy Adams – The Master
Judi Dench – Skyfall
Ann Dowd – Compliance
Sally Field – Lincoln
Anne Hathaway – Les Miserables
Helen Hunt – The Sessions

BEST YOUNG ACTOR/ACTRESS
Elle Fanning – Ginger & Rosa
Kara Hayward – Moonrise Kingdom
Tom Holland – The Impossible
Logan Lerman – The Perks of Being a Wallflower
Suraj Sharma – Life of Pi
Quvenzhane Wallis – Beasts of the Southern Wild

BEST ACTING ENSEMBLE
Argo
The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel
Les Miserables
Lincoln
Moonrise Kingdom
Silver Linings Playbook

BEST DIRECTOR
Ben Affleck – Argo
Kathryn Bigelow – Zero Dark Thirty
Tom Hooper – Les Miserables
Ang Lee – Life of Pi
David O. Russell – Silver Linings Playbook
Steven Spielberg – Lincoln

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Quentin Tarantino – Django Unchained
John Gatins – Flight
Rian Johnson – Looper
Paul Thomas Anderson – The Master
Wes Anderson & Roman Coppola – Moonrise Kingdom
Mark Boal – Zero Dark Thirty

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Chris Terrio – Argo
Tony Kushner – Lincoln
David O. Russell – Silver Linings Playbook
David Magee – Life of Pi
Stephen Chbosky – The Perks of Being a Wallflower

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Life of Pi – Claudio Miranda
Lincoln – Janusz Kaminski
Les Miserables – Danny Cohen
The Master – Mihai Malaimare Jr.
Skyfall – Roger Deakins

BEST ART DIRECTION
Anna Karenina – Sarah Greenwood/Production Designer, Katie Spencer/Set Decorator
The Hobbit – Dan Hennah/Production Designer, Ra Vincent & Simon Bright/Set Decorators
Les Miserables – Eve Stewart/Production Designer, Anna Lynch-Robinson/Set Decorator
Life of Pi – David Gropman/Production Designer, Anna Pinnock/Set Decorator
Lincoln – Rick Carter/Production Designer, Jim Erickson/Set Decorator

BEST EDITING
Argo – William Goldenberg
Les Miserables – Melanie Ann Oliver, Chris Dickens
Life of Pi – Tim Squyres
Lincoln – Michael Kahn
Zero Dark Thirty – William Goldenberg, Dylan Tichenor

BEST COSTUME DESIGN
Anna Karenina – Jacqueline Durran
Cloud Atlas – Kym Barrett, Pierre-Yves Gayraud
The Hobbit – Bob Buck, Ann Maskrey, Richard Taylor
Les Miserables – Paco Delgado
Lincoln – Joanna Johnston

BEST MAKEUP
Cloud Atlas
The Hobbit
Les Miserables
Lincoln

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
The Avengers
Cloud Atlas
The Dark Knight Rises
The Hobbit
Life of Pi

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE
Brave
Frankenweenie
Madagascar 3
ParaNorman
Rise of the Guardians
Wreck-It Ralph

BEST ACTION MOVIE
The Avengers
The Dark Knight Rises
Looper
Skyfall

BEST ACTOR IN AN ACTION MOVIE
Christian Bale – The Dark Knight Rises
Daniel Craig – Skyfall
Robert Downey Jr. – The Avengers
Joseph Gordon-Levitt – Looper
Jake Gyllenhaal – End of Watch

BEST ACTRESS IN AN ACTION MOVIE
Emily Blunt – Looper
Gina Carano – Haywire
Judi Dench – Skyfall
Anne Hathaway – The Dark Knight Rises
Jennifer Lawrence – The Hunger Games

BEST COMEDY
Bernie
Silver Linings Playbook
Ted
This Is 40
21 Jump Street

BEST ACTOR IN A COMEDY
Jack Black – Bernie
Bradley Cooper – Silver Linings Playbook
Paul Rudd – This Is 40
Channing Tatum – 21 Jump Street
Mark Wahlberg – Ted

BEST ACTRESS IN A COMEDY
Mila Kunis – Ted
Jennifer Lawrence – Silver Linings Playbook
Shirley MacLaine – Bernie
Leslie Mann – This Is 40
Rebel Wilson – Pitch Perfect

BEST SCI-FI/HORROR MOVIE
Cabin in the Woods
Looper
Prometheus

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
Amour
The Intouchables
A Royal Affair
Rust and Bone

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
Bully
The Imposter
Queen of Versailles
Searching for Sugar Man
The Central Park Five
West of Memphis

BEST SONG
“For You” – performed by Keith Urban/written by Monty Powell & Keith Urban – Actor of Valor
“Skyfall” – performed by Adele/written by Adele Adkins & Paul Epworth – Skyfall
“Still Alive” – performed by Paul Williams/written by Paul Williams – Paul Williams Still Alive
“Suddenly” – performed by Hugh Jackman/written by Claude-Michel Schonberg & Alain Boublil & Herbert Kretzmer – Les Miserables
“Learn Me Right” – performed by Birdy with Mumford & Sons/written by Mumford & Sons – Brave

BEST SCORE
Argo – Alexandre Desplat
Life of Pi – Mychael Danna
Lincoln – John Williams
The Master – Jonny Greenwood
Moonrise Kingdom – Alexandre Desplat

 

 

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