Tag Archive: daniel day-lewis


From the outside, it looked like Steven Spielberg’s political biopic would walk the Oscars, but canny campaigning saw Ben Affleck‘s Iran-hostage drama pip it at the post. Here’s how they did it

Argo and Lincoln

Head to head … Argo and Lincoln

Argo‘s yo-yo awards season ended on an upswing on Sunday as the Tehran yarn clinched the Big Kahuna of movie honours. Ben Affleck‘s third outing as director endured the proverbial rollercoaster ride over the past five months and the Warner Bros crowd will be partying late into the night after winning best picture. This was the first time since Driving Miss Daisy in 1989 that the prize had gone to a movie whose director had not been nominated for an Oscar.

  1. Argo
  2. Production year: 2012
  3. Country: USA
  4. Cert (UK): 15
  5. Runtime: 120 mins
  6. Directors: Ben Affleck
  7. Cast: Alan Arkin, Ben Affleck, Bryan Cranston, Christopher Denham, Clea DuVall, John Goodman, Kerry Bishe, Rory Cochrane, Scoot McNairy, Tate Donovan, Victor Garber
  8. More on this film

The popular narrative of what has been an unusually high-calibre awards season is that Argo – the people’s favourite – snuck in at the eleventh hour to swipe the best picture prize from Lincoln. Not so. Argo never lost its high standing among voters and maintained its campaign momentum – albeit in a more nuanced manner in recent weeks – despite the mighty efforts of the publicity machine behind Steven Spielberg‘s august history lesson.

The campaign machine was chugging along nicely and then on 8 October, four days before Argo was due to open in US cinemas, Lincoln premiered at the New York film festival. Spielberg was about to throw a spanner in the works. Suddenly Argo was no longer the name on everyone’s lips. Lincoln was being hailed in some quarters as a masterpiece, perhaps Spielberg’s best since Schindler’s List. Hollywood lined up to kneel before the altar of Daniel Day-Lewis. An air of invincibility coalesced around Lincoln as the first awards groups prepared to announce their winners.

Day-Lewis as Abraham Lincoln was a match made in prestige movie heaven and the Anglo-Irish actor dominated his category, earning accolades from just about every awards group including the influential Screen Actors Guild, the largest voting block in the Academy. He duly won his third lead actor Oscar on Sunday and became the first man to do so. Spielberg did not make it on to the winners’ podium and, in a rare surprise on the night, had to watch as Ang Lee won best director for Life of Pi.

Read more here: http://bit.ly/XvUPak

By the start of the year Lincoln had garnered the most Golden Globe and Oscar nominations and was the perceived frontrunner. This suited the Argo camp, which wanted their contender to be the marginal underdog. At the Golden Globes in January, Lincoln suffered its first public reversal as Argo prevailed in the best dramatic picture contest and Affleck beat Spielberg in the directing category.

Two weeks later, over the course of one heady weekend, Argo delivered a one-two punch to land best picture at the Producers Guild of America and best ensemble cast at the Screen Actors Guild. On 3 February Affleck became only the third person to win the DGA award without an Oscar nomination. Two weeks later Chris Terrio won the WGA’s adapted screenplay honour. The votes for successive shows had already been cast. The late cascade of prizes may have seemed like people were suddenly championing Argo, but in reality the movie’s enduring pedigree never wavered and Hollywood had made up its mind.

 

Steven Spielberg has crafted a literate, heartfelt film about Abraham Lincoln’s second term in office and his battle to end slavery, with a masterful central performance

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Lincoln trailer. Link to video: Lincoln: watch the exclusive international trailer

Abraham Lincoln‘s second term, with its momentous choices, has been brought to the screen by Steven Spielberg as a fascinatingly theatrical contest of rhetoric and strategy. It is a nest of high politics for the white ruling class, far from the brutality and chaos of the battlefield. At its centre is a gaunt Shakespearian figure, somewhere between Caesar and Prospero.

Spielberg has made a moving and honourably high-minded film about this world-changing moment of American history, his best for many years: I can’t imagine anyone not wanting to see it, and to experience the pleasures of something acted with such intelligence and depth. There is admittedly sometimes a hint of hokum; how you react to the film may depend on how you take the opening sequence in which Lincoln, seated like the famous statue but with an easy smile, listens to two black soldiers telling him how they see the war – a slightly Sorkinian scene that ends with one reciting the Gettysburg address while walking away from the president. It is a flight of fancy, not strictly plausible, but very effective in establishing a mood music that swells progressively throughout the picture.

Lincoln exerted a grip on me; it is literate, cerebral, heartfelt, with some brilliantly managed moments and, of course, a unique central performance from Daniel Day-Lewis. He portrays Lincoln as a devastating master of charm and exquisite manners, skilled in imposing his authority with a genial anecdote, a man with the natural leader’s trick of making people want to please him. He speaks in an unexpectedly light, clear voice that is nonetheless shading off into the maundering monologue of an old man, exhausted by war and personal catastrophes.

Day-Lewis, like Olivier before him, is a master of the voice and the walk: it’s almost as if he has alchemised his body shape into something different: bowed, spindly and angular, gnarled as a tree, exotic and yet natural as his tall hat, often holding the straight right arm at the elbow with the left behind his back: the civilian equivalent of military bearing. His Lincoln is aware that his strength is ebbing; he is on the point of ossifying into a legend incapable of action. He is often seen in semidarkness, his face turned down in contemplation of possible, terrible defeat, or the certain terrible cost of victory: like the Shikler portrait of Kennedy.

His political capital, though great, is a deteriorating asset, and as the civil war grinds on, Lincoln begins his second term wishing to stake it all on rushing through a constitutional amendment abolishing slavery before defeating the South. To get it through the system, he must do business with truculent radical Thaddeus Stevens (Tommy Lee Jones), and at the same time entreat conservative Republican Preston Blair (Hal Holbrook) for his faction’s votes. Blair’s condition is that Lincoln must swallow his pride and accept, or appear to accept, some sort of secret, provisional peace mission from the rebels in Virginia, a risky gesture that the president must conceal from his trusted secretary of state, William Seward (David Strathairn). Dangerous evasions and compromises are made, but the rebels stay strong; they do not surrender as Lincoln hopes and the awful, unthinkable truth is that he may have to abandon his anti-slavery amendment as a sop to get them to talk peace, end the bloodshed and preserve the Union. Has he gambled and lost?

There are some heartstoppingly good setpieces. The moment in which Lincoln has to raise the flag outside a naval building, after a short, self-deprecating speech that he has written on a piece of paper – kept in his hat – is a superbly managed scene: modest, undramatic, gently comic. Sally Field is outstanding as Lincoln’s wife, nursing rage and hurt that almost boils over as she must bandy words at a White House reception with Stevens, whom she detests: Spielberg shows Abraham in the background, chatting diplomatically but then noticing how Mrs Lincoln is about to damage his chances with a key ally. Read more here http://bit.ly/10V5OOs

 

by peter bradshaw for guardian.co.uk

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LOS ANGELES (January 23, 2013) — Alan Arkin, Jessica Chastain, Daniel Day-Lewis, Sally Field, John Goodman, Damian Lewis and Julianne Moore will be presenters at the 19th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards®, Executive Producer Jeff Margolis announced today.

They join a growing roster of actors who will honor their colleagues at the SAG Awards that already includes Ben Affleck, Alec Baldwin, Bradley Cooper, Jeff Daniels, Viola Davis, Robert De Niro, Neil Patrick Harris, Anne Hathaway, SAG-AFTRA Co-President Ken Howard, Hugh Jackman, Nicole Kidman, Jennifer Lawrence, Julianna Margulies, Busy Philipps, SAG-AFTRA Co-President Roberta Reardon, Carl Reiner, Liev Schreiber, Taye Diggs, Justin Timberlake, Kerry Washington, Naomi Watts and Sigourney Weaver.

Oscar nominee Alan Arkin received his first SAG Award in 2007 as a member of the “Little Miss Sunshine” cast and was nominated for his supporting role in the film. He is currently nominated for his supporting role in “Argo” and as a member of the film’s cast. He’s got two comedies on tap: “Stand Up Guys,” opposite Al Pacino and Christopher Walken, and “The Incredible Burt Wonderstone,” opposite Steve Carell and Jim Carrey.

Golden Globe recipient and Oscar nominee Jessica Chastain earned a SAG Award in 2012 along with her fellow cast members in “The Help” and was nominated in the supporting actress category, as well. This year, she is nominated for her lead performance in Kathryn Bigelow’s “Zero Dark Thirty.” She currently stars in the Guillermo Del Toro-produced “Mama” and will soon be seen in the double feature “The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: His” and “The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Hers.”

Oscar nominee Daniel Day-Lewis was a Screen Actors Guild Award recipient in 2003 for his work in “Gangs of New York” and in 2008 for his role in “There Will Be Blood.” In 2010, he was nominated along with the cast of “Nine.” He has received a total of five SAG Awards nominations, including two this year for his title role in Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln” and as a member of the film’s cast.

Oscar nominee Sally Field is an eight-time SAG Awards nominee and the recipient of one Actor® statuette, for her role as Nora Walker in “Brothers & Sisters.” She’s nominated twice this year, for her performance as Mary Todd Lincoln in Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln” and as a member of the film’s cast. Last summer, she was seen as Aunt May in the blockbuster “The Amazing Spider-Man” opposite Andrew Garfield.

Along with his co-stars, four-time SAG Awards nominee John Goodman is recognized this year with a cast in a motion picture nomination for “Argo.” Other recent film roles include “Trouble With the Curve” and “Flight.” Next up are two dramas — the Coen Brothers’ “Inside Llewyn Davis” and George Clooney’s “The Monuments Men” — and the comedies “The Hangover: Part III” and “The Internship.” This summer, he reprises the role of Sulley in “Monsters University,” the sequel to the Disney-Pixar animated film “Monsters, Inc.”

Golden Globe recipient Damian Lewis is nominated for two SAG Awards: for his performance as Nicholas Brody in Showtime’s “Homeland,” which just finished its second season, and as a member of the series’ ensemble.

Julianne Moore is a Golden Globe recipient and SAG Awards nominee for her role as Sarah Palin in “Game Change.” She has received a total of 10 SAG Awards nominations in her career. Upcoming movie roles include “What Maisie Knew” with Alexander Skarsgard; “Don Jon’s Addiction” with Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Scarlett Johansson; “The Seventh Son” with Jeff Bridges; “Carrie” with Chloe Grace Moretz; and the action thriller “Non-Stop.”

The 19th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards, one of the awards season’s premier events, will be simulcast live coast-to-coast on TNT and TBS on Sunday, Jan. 27, 2013, at 8 p.m. (ET)/5 p.m. (PT) from the Shrine Exposition Center in Los Angeles. An encore primetime telecast will begin immediately following on TNT at 10 p.m. (ET)/7 p.m. (PT). The ceremony will also be telecast internationally, as well as to U.S. military installations overseas through the American Forces Network Broadcast Center.

source: sagawards.com

 

Hollywood Foreign Press Association, 2013 Golden Globes Announcement

With the Oscar nominations and Critics Choice Awards announced on Thursday, it was up to the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA) earlier this evening to try to get in one final round of awards before the two-week wait until the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) and the even longer wait until Oscar night. Normally, I don’t take the Golden Globes very seriously, mainly because they’re a very different group from either the critics or the people in the industry honoring their own. These are foreign entertainment journalists working in Los Angeles and let’s just say that they’ve earned a rep for being easy to buy.The most important thing to remember is that the HFPA has separate categories for Drama and Comedy/Musical, which makes it far more difficult when honing down the acting categories to possible winners at the Oscars. It also doesn’t help that only 15 of the 30 actors nominated in the various acting categories at the Golden Globes have also received Oscar nominations, since there are ten less slots.

In the past, the HFPA has gone with movies as their Best Picture that don’t necessarily end up winning Oscars in that category. You’d have to go all the way back to 2008’s Slumdog Millionaire to find a year when the Golden Globes’ pick in the drama category and Oscar’s Best Picture were one and the same. Before that? The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King five years earlier. In fact, some might even consider winning a Golden Globe in the Best Picture category to be bad luck or some kind of jinx in terms of an Oscar win going by their track record. Okay, maybe I’m going a bit far there since last year’s Oscar Best Picture winner wasThe Artist, which won the Golden Globe in the Comedy/Musical category, the only movie since 2002’sChicago to take home that pair.

_Argo_afleckSo where does that leave last night’s Drama winner Argo (Warner Bros.), which won the Critics Choice award a few nights earlier? It was going up against four other films in the Drama category that received Oscar nominations with only two of them that had corresponding directing nominations. This win came after the big surprise of the night as Ben Affleck won Best Director for the movie, his second win of the week and second since being snubbed for an Oscar nomination in the directing category. Argo really didn’t feel like a “Golden Globe”-type movie, but clearly audiences have taken to the movie and that’s also true with the journalists of the Hollywood Foreign Press. Or maybe they just had easier access to Affleck during the nomination process? Who knows, but having Affleck win two precursors and potentially winning the DGA as well leaves us with an Oscar category in which the director who wins on Oscar night may be doing so without any previous win. Except maybe the DGA. We have to keep in mind that it’s been a long time since a movie won Best Picture at the Oscars without having its director at least nominated.

Going by the last few years, Argo‘s win at the Golden Globes may pretty much end its awards run as now we get to the industry guilds and the Academy itself who rarely go with the same selection. What’s really going to be telling is the next few awards, starting with the Producers Guild’s award on January 26, the SAG Ensemble on January 27 and the DGA shortly after. One of those three groups could also pick Argo… or something else entirely. Basically, there are too many good movies in the running this year, so we shouldn’t be too surprised if we start seeing more support for some of the other movies in the running.

There were only two movies in the Comedy/Musical category that received Best Picture nominations, David O. Russell’s Silver Linings Playbook and the musical Les Misérables. These two were considered the strongest contenders to win the category depending on which way the HFPA members went with, neither having a corresponding directing nomination to give us a hint. When it comes down to it, the HFPA love their musicals–one of the reasons why they have this category–so it seemed that Les Misérables would be an easy choice for them.

What’s interesting is that all three of the movies mentioned above are up for the SAG Ensemble award along with Spielberg’s Lincoln (DreamWorks), another potential frontrunner, and whichever one wins that night may make it far more obvious which way the Academy may go when selecting their best picture.

As far as the acting categories, Jennifer Lawrence won in the Comedy/Musical category for Silver Linings Playbook, which kept her away from her strongest competition in the Oscar actress category, Jessica Chastain, who in turn won in the Drama category for Zero Dark Thirty. Like Daniel Day-Lewis and Anne Hathaway winning in their respective categories, Lawrence and Chastain were the least surprising wins of the Golden Globes, although it now makes it a full-on heads up horse race for which one will win on Oscar night. At least Hugh Jackman had some competition worth considering in the Musical/Comedy category with all the recent support for Bradley Cooper in Russell’s comedy, but Jackman’s win further proved the HFPA’s love for musicals as Les Misérables won a few moments later.

Incidentally, this is the first time since 2005 that the Critics Choice and Golden Globes for Supporting Actor went to two different performances despite being one of the most consistent categories over the years. In 2005, the Critics Choice went to Paul Giamatti for Cinderella Man. He went on to receive the Screen Actors Guild’s honor in the category, while the Golden Globe went to George Clooney for Syriana for which he won the Oscar. In 2006, Eddie Murphy won all three precursors, but then lost the Oscar to Alan Arkin. Philip Seymour Hoffman winning over the critics and German actor winning the Golden Globe (from a group including many foreigners) opens things up for the Screen Actors Guild to go elsewhere since Waltz wasn’t nominated by them and that could determine who wins on Oscar night, which could very well be a third actor altogether. Either way, it’s great to have a category where there may be some surprises.

As far as the screenplay category, it’s not one I’d normally take seriously when it comes to the Golden Globes, but they followed the very different Broadcast Film Critics Association by giving the award to Quentin Tarantino for Django Unchained two days earlier, so we have to start taking it seriously. Most people assumed that Mark Boal’s screenplay for Zero Dark Thirty had this in the bag on Oscar night, but there’s a chance the controversy the movie has stirred up–not to mention Mark Boal’s recent Oscar win… over Tarantino, in fact–could shift the advantage to Tarantino to win his first Oscar since Pulp Fiction.

Lastly, Animated Feature went to Disney•Pixar’s Brave as opposed to Disney’s own Wreck-It Ralph, which won the Critics Choice award, and the fact there isn’t one movie even those two groups agreed upon means that the Oscar is still anyone’s game.

Things may be a bit slow in terms of Oscar updates over the next few weeks though I do have a couple of ideas I’ll try to share while everyone else is at Sundance.

–source: edward douglas for comingsoon.net

 

“Argo,” “Les Miserables,” “Girls,” “Homeland” and “Game Change” are among the night’s big winners.

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Winners for the 70th annual Golden Globe Awards are being announced live on NBC in a ceremony taking place at the Beverly HiltonTina Fey and Amy Poehler are hosting.
The complete list of nominees and winners at the 2013 Golden Globes (winners’ names are in bold and denoted with an asterisk):

Best Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical
The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel
*Les Miserables
Moonrise Kingdom
Salmon Fishing in the Yemen
Silver Linings Playbook

Best Motion Picture, Drama
*Argo
Django Unchained
Life of Pi
Lincoln
Zero Dark Thirty

Best Director, Motion Picture
*Ben Affleck, Argo
Kathryn Bigelow, Zero Dark Thirty
Ang Lee, Life of Pi
Steven Spielberg, Lincoln
Quentin Tarantino, Django Unchained

Best Actor in a Motion Picture, Drama
*Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln
Richard Gere, Arbitrage
John Hawkes, The Sessions
Joaquin Phoenix, The Master
Denzel Washington, Flight

Best Actress in a Motion Picture, Drama

*Jessica Chastain, Zero Dark Thirty
Marion Cotillard, Rust and Bone
Helen Mirren, Hitchcock
Naomi Watts, The Impossible
Rachel Weisz, The Deep Blue Sea

Best Actor in a Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical
Jack Black, Bernie
Bradley Cooper, Silver Linings Playbook
*Hugh Jackman, Les Miserables
Ewan McGregor, Salmon Fishing in the Yemen
Bill Murray, Hyde Park on Hudson

Best Actress in a Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical
Emily Blunt, Salmon Fishing in the Yemen
Judi Dench, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel
*Jennifer Lawrence, Silver Linings Playbook
Maggie Smith, Quartet
Meryl Streep, Hope Springs

Best Foreign Language Film
*Amour (Austria)
A Royal Affair (Denmark)
The Intouchables (France)
Kon-Tiki (Norway/U.K./Denmark)
Rust and Bone (France)

Best Actress in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture

Amy Adams, The Master
Sally Field, Lincoln
*Anne Hathaway, Les Miserables
Helen Hunt, The Sessions
Nicole Kidman, The Paperboy

Best Actor in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture
Alan Arkin, Argo
Leonardo DiCaprio, Django Unchained
Philip Seymour Hoffman, The Master
Tommy Lee Jones, Lincoln
*Christoph Waltz, Django Unchained

Best TV Series, Comedy or Musical
The Big Bang Theory
Episodes
*Girls
Modern Family
Smash

Best TV Series, Drama
Breaking Bad
Boardwalk Empire
Downton Abbey
*Homeland
The Newsroom

Best TV Movie or Miniseries

*Game Change
The Girl
Hatfields and McCoys
The Hour
Political Animals

__homeland-season-2-poster

Best Performance by an Actress in a TV series, Drama
Connie Britton, Nashville
Glenn Close, Damages
*Claire Danes, Homeland
Michelle Dockery, Downton Abbey
Julianna Margulies, The Good Wife

Best Performance by an Actor in a TV Series, Drama
Steve Buscemi, Boardwalk Empire
Bryan Cranston, Breaking Bad
Jeff Daniels, The Newsroom
Jon Hamm, Mad Men
*Damian Lewis, Homeland

Best Performance by an Actress in a TV Series, Comedy or Musical
Zooey Deschanel, New Girl
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Veep
*Lena Dunham, Girls
Tina Fey, 30 Rock
Amy Poehler, Parks and Recreation

Best Performance by an Actor in a TV Series, Comedy or Musical

Alec Baldwin, 30 Rock
*Don Cheadle, House of Lies
Matt LeBlanc, Episodes
Louis CK, Louie
Jim Parsons, The Big Bang Theory

Best Performance by an Actor in a Miniseries or TV Movie
*Kevin Costner, Hatfields and McCoys
Benedict Cumberbatch, Sherlock
Woody Harrleson, Game Change
Toby Jones, The Girl
Clive Owen, Hemingway and Gellhorn

Best Performance by an Actress in a Miniseries or TV Movie
Nicole Kidman, Hemingway and Gellhorn
Jessica Lange, American Horror Story
Sienna Miller, The Girl
*Julianne Moore, Game Change
Sigourney Weaver, Political Animals

Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Miniseries or TV Movie
Hayden Panettiere, Nashville
Archie Panjabi, The Good Wife
Sarah Paulson, Game Change
*Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey
Sofia Vergara, Modern Family

Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Miniseries or TV Movie

Max Greenfield, New Girl
*Ed Harris, Game Change
Danny Huston, Magic City
Mandy Patinkin, Homeland
Eric Stonestreet, Modern Family

Best Animated Film
*Brave
Frankenweenie
Hotel Transylvania
Rise of the Guardians
Wreck-It Ralph

Best Screenplay for a Motion Picture
Zero Dark Thirty (Mark Boal)
Lincoln (Tony Kushner)
Silver Linings Playbook (David O. Russell)
*Django Unchained (Quentin Tarantino)
Argo (Chris Terrio)

Best Score for a Motion Picture
*Life of Pi (Mychael Danna)
Argo (Alexandre Desplat)
Anna Karenina (Dario Marianelli)
Cloud Atlas (Tom Tykwer, Johnny Klimek, Reinhold Heil)
Lincoln (John Williams)

Best Original Song, Motion Picture

“For You” – Act of Valor
“Not Running Anymore” – Stand Up Guys
“Safe & Sound” – The Hunger Games
*”Skyfall” – Skyfall
“Suddenly” – Les Miserables

 

–source: hollywoodreporter.com

DFCS 2012 Awards – ‘Argo,’ Affleck in Winner’s Circle

_Argo_afleck

Director Ben Affleck’s “Argo,” the true story of six Americans who escape from Iran courtesy of a science fiction film scam, is the Denver Film Critics Society’s selection for 2012′s best film.

Affleck also earned honors for best direction in a film, a strong indicator “Argo” will be featured prominently when the Academy Award nominations are announced Thursday.

Best acting honors went to Daniel Day-Lewis for his stunning transformation into the 16th president in “Lincoln” and Jennifer Lawrence for her mature, exhilarating turn in “Silver Linings Playbook”

The complete list of DFCS winners:

  • Best Film: “Argo”
  • Best Achievement in Directing: Ben Affleck, “Argo”
  • Best Lead Performance by an Actor, Male: Daniel Day-Lewis, “Lincoln”
  • Best Lead Performance by an Actor, Female: Jennifer Lawrence, “Silver Linings Playbook”
  • Best Supporting Performance by an Actor, Male: Philip Seymour Hoffman, “The Master”
  • Best Supporting Performance by an Actor, Female: Anne Hathaway, “Les Misérables”
  • Best Animated Feature: “ParaNorman
  • Best Original Screenplay: Wes Anderson, Roman Coppola, “Moonrise Kingdom”
  • Best Adapted Screenplay: David O. Russell, “Silver Linings Playbook”
  • Best Documentary Feature: “Jiro Dreams of Sushi”
  • Best Original Song: “Skyfall,” Adele (“Skyfall”)
  • Best Original Score: Hans Zimmer, “The Dark Knight Rises
  • Best Non-English Language Feature: “Amour”

The Denver Film Critics Society, featuring movie critics from the greater Denver region, selected “The Tree of Life” as 2011′s Best Film.

 

— taken from denverfilmcritics.org image from sheknows.com

The full list of this year’s BAFTA nominations, which see Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln out on top.

Steven Spielberg’s presidential biopic Lincoln leads the pack in this year’s nominations for the EE British Academy Film Awards (BAFTAs), with 10 nods including Best Film, Adapted Screenplay, and Daniel Day-Lewis as Leading Actor.

Les Misérables and Life of Pi follow close behind with nine nominations apiece. Les Misérables is nominated as both Best Film and Outstanding British Film, with further nominations for Hugh Jackman as Leading Actor and Anne Hathaway as Supporting Actress. Life of Pi is up for Best Film, Adapted Screenplay and Best Director for Ang Lee.

Other films with multiple nominations include Skyfall, the latest Bond film, with eight; Ben Affleck’s political thriller Argo, with seven; the Tolstoy adaptation Anna Karenina with six; and Django Unchained and Zero Dark Thirty with five each.

Nominees for the EE Rising Star Award, voted for by the public and presented to an actor of promising talent, include Elizabeth Olsen, Andrea Riseborough, Suraj Sharma, Juno Temple and Alicia Vikander.

“It’s great to see a diverse range of British films nominated across so many categories at this year’s BAFTAs,” comments Ben Roberts, Director of the BFI Film Fund. “Coming just ahead of tomorrow’s Oscar nominations, BAFTA is once again doing a fantastic job of spotlighting ambitious, large-scale British filmmaking just as the international awards season gets into full swing.”

Three films supported by the BFI Film Fund have received nominations: Martin McDonagh’s Seven Psychopaths for Outstanding British Film; Mike Newell’s Great Expectations for Costume Design; and Fyzal Boulifa’s The Curse for Short Film. Roberts adds: “I’m also really proud to see three films backed by the BFI Film Fund nominated, and my warmest congratulations go to everyone involved in those and indeed all the nominated films.”

The awards will be announced on Sunday 10 February at a ceremony hosted by Stephen Fry at the Royal Opera House, London.

Best Film

Argo – Grant Heslov, Ben Affleck, George Clooney
Les Misérables – Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Debra Hayward, Cameron Mackintosh
Life of Pi – Gil Netter, Ang Lee, David Womark
Lincoln – Steven Spielberg, Kathleen Kennedy
Zero Dark Thirty – Mark Boal, Kathryn Bigelow, Megan Ellison

Outstanding British Film

Anna Karenina – Joe Wright, Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Paul Webster, Tom Stoppard
The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel – John Madden, Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin, Ol Parker
Les Misérables – Tom Hooper, Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Debra Hayward, Cameron Mackintosh, William Nicholson, Alain Boublil, Claude-Michel Schönberg, Herbert Kretzmer
Seven Psychopaths – Martin McDonagh, Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin
Skyfall – Sam Mendes, Michael G. Wilson, Barbara Broccoli, Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, John Logan

Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer

Bart Layt (Director), Dimitri Doganis (Producer) – The Imposter
David Morris (Director), Jacqui Morris (Director/Producer) – McCullin Dexter Fletcher (Director/Writer), Danny King (Writer) – Wild Bill
James Bobin (Director) – The Muppets
Tina Gharavi (Director/Writer) – I Am Nasrine

Film Not in the English Language

Amour – Michael Haneke, Margaret Ménégoz
Headhunters – Morten Tyldum, Marianne Gray, Asle Vatn
The Hunt – Thomas Vinterberg, Sisse Graum Jørgensen, Morten Kaufmann
Rust and Bone – Jacques Audiard, Pascal Caucheteux
Untouchable – Eric Toledano, Olivier Nakache, Nicolas Duval Adassovsky, Yann Zenou, Laurent Zeitoun

Documentary

The Imposter – Bart Layton, Dimitri Doganis
Marley – Kevin Macdonald, Steve Bing, Charles Steel
McCullin – David Morris, Jacqui Morris
Searching for Sugar Man – Malik Bendjelloul, Simon Chinn
West of Memphis – Amy Berg

Animated Film

Brave – Mark Andrews, Brenda Chapman
Frankenweenie – Tim Burton
Paranorman – Sam Fell, Chris Butler

Director

Amour – Michael Haneke
Argo – Ben Affleck
Django Unchained – Quentin Tarantino
Life of Pi – Ang Lee
Zero Dark Thirty – Kathryn Bigelow

Original Screenplay

Amour – Michael Haneke
Django Unchained – Quentin Tarantino
The Master – Paul Thomas Anderson
Moonrise Kingdom – Wes Anderson, Roman Coppola
Zero Dark Thirty – Mark Boal

Adapted Screenplay

Argo – Chris Terrio
Beasts of the Southern Wild – Lucy Alibar, Benh Zeitlin
Life of Pi – David Magee
Lincoln – Tony Kushner
Silver Linings Playbook – David O. Russell

Leading Actor

Ben Affleck – Argo
Bradley Cooper – Silver Linings Playbook
Daniel Day-Lewis – Lincoln
Hugh Jackman – Les Misérables
Joaquin Phoenix –The Master

Leading Actress

Emmanuelle Riva – Amour
Helen Mirren – Hitchcock
Jennifer Lawrence – Silver Linings Playbook
Jessica Chastain – Zero Dark Thirty
Marion Cotillard – Rust and Bone

Supporting Actor

Alan Arkin – Argo
Christoph Waltz – Django Unchained
Javier Bardem – Skyfall
Philip Seymour Hoffman – The Master
Tommy Lee Jones – Lincoln

Supporting Actress

Amy Adams – The Master
Anne Hathaway – Les Misérables
Helen Hunt – The Sessions
Judi Dench – Skyfall
Sally Field – Lincoln

Original Music

Anna Karenina – Dario Marianelli
Argo – Alexandre Desplat
Life of Pi – Mychael Danna
Lincoln – John Williams
Skyfall – Thomas Newman

Cinematography

Anna Karenina – Seamus McGarvey
Les Misérables – Danny Cohen
Life of Pi – Claudio Miranda
Lincoln – Janusz Kaminski
Skyfall  – Roger Deakins

Editing

Argo – William Goldenberg
Django Unchained – Fred Raskin
Life of Pi – Tim Squyres
Skyfall – Stuart Baird
Zero Dark Thirty – Dylan Tichenor, William Goldenberg

Production Design

Anna Karenina – Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer
Les Misérables – Eve Stewart, Anna Lynch-Robinson
Life of Pi – David Gropman, Anna Pinnock
Lincoln – Rick Carter, Jim Erickson
Skyfall – Dennis Gassner, Anna Pinnock

Costume Design

Anna Karenina – Jacqueline Durran
Great Expectations – Beatrix Aruna Pasztor
Les Misérables – Paco Delgado
Lincoln – Joanna Johnston
Snow White and the Huntsman – Colleen Atwood

Make-up and Hair

Anna Karenina – Ivana Primorac
Hitchcock – Julie Hewett, Martin Samuel, Howard Berger
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey – Peter Swords King, Richard Taylor, Rick Findlater
Les Misérables – Lisa Westcott
Lincoln – Lois Burwell, Kay Georgiou

Sound

Django Unchained – Mark Ulano, Michael Minkler, Tony Lamberti, Wylie Stateman
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey – Tony Johnson, Christopher Boyes, Michael Hedges, Michael Semanick, Brent Burge, Chris Ward
Les Misérables – Simon Hayes, Andy Nelson, Mark Paterson, Jonathan Allen, Lee Walpole, John Warhurst
Life of Pi – Drew Kunin, Eugene Gearty, Philip Stockton, Ron Bartlett, D. M. Hemphill
Skyfall – Stuart Wilson, Scott Millan, Greg P. Russell, Per Hallberg, Karen Baker Landers

Special Visual Effects

The Dark Knight Rises – Paul Franklin, Chris Corbould, Peter Bebb, Andrew Lockley
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey – Joe Letteri, Eric Saindon, David Clayton, R. Christopher White
Life of Pi – Bill Westenhofer, Guillaume Rocheron, Erik-Jan De Boer
Marvel Avengers Assemble – Nominees TBC
Prometheus – Richard Stammers, Charley Henley, Trevor Wood, Paul Butterworth

Short Animation

Here to Fall – Kris Kelly, Evelyn McGrath
I’m Fine Thanks – Eamonn O’Neill
The Making of Longbird – Will Anderson, Ainslie Henderson

Short Film

The Curse – Fyzal Boulifa, Gavin Humphries
Good Night – Muriel d’Ansembourg, Eva Sigurdardottir
Swimmer – Lynne Ramsay, Peter Carlton, Diarmid Scrimshaw
Tumult – Johnny Barrington, Rhianna Andrews
The Voorman Problem – Mark Gill, Baldwin Li

The EE Rising Star Award (voted for by the public)

Elizabeth Olsen
Andrea Riseborough
Suraj Sharma
Juno Temple
Alicia Vikander

–taken from bfi.org.uk

Hollywood Foreign Press Association, 2013 Golden Globes Announcement

1.    BEST MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

a.    ARGO
Warner Bros. Pictures, GK Films, Smokehouse Pictures; Warner Bros. Pictures

b.    DJANGO UNCHAINED
The Weinstein Company, Columbia Pictures; The Weinstein Company/Sony Pictures Releasing

c.    LIFE OF PI
Fox 2000 Pictures; Twentieth Century Fox

d.    LINCOLN
DreamWorks Pictures, Twentieth Century Fox; Touchstone Pictures

e.    ZERO DARK THIRTY
Columbia Pictures and Annapurna Pictures; Sony Pictures Releasing

2.    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

a.    Jessica Chastain     ZERO DARK THIRTY

b.    Marion Cotillard    RUST AND BONE

c.    Helen Mirren    HITCHCOCK

d.    NAOMI WATTS     THE IMPOSSIBLE

e.    Rachel Weisz     THE DEEP BLUE SEA

3. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

a.    Daniel Day-Lewis     LINCOLN

b.    Richard Gere         ARBITRAGE

c.    JOHN HAWKES         THE SESSIONS

d.    Joaquin Phoenix     THE MASTER

e.    Denzel Washington FLIGHT

4.    BEST MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL
Blueprint Pictures/Participant Media; Fox Searchlight Pictures

b.    LES MISERABLES
Universal Pictures, A Working Title Films/Cameron Mackintosh Productions; Universal Pictures

c.    MOONRISE KINGDOM
Indian Paintbrush; Focus Features

d.    SALMON FISH IN GIN THE YEMEN
CBS Films; CBS Films

e.    SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK
The Weinstein Company; The Weinstein Company

5.    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    Emily Blunt         SALMON FISHING IN THE YEMEN

b.    Judi Dench             THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL

c.    Jennifer Lawrence  SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK

d.    Maggie Smith         QUARTET

e.    Meryl Streep         HOPE SPRINGS

6. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    Jack Black             BERNIE

b.    BRADLEY COOPER     SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK

c.    Hugh Jackman         LES MISERABLES

d.    Ewan McGregor     SALMON FISHING IN THE YEMEN

e.    Bill Murray         HYDE PARK ON HUDSON

7.    BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

a.    BRAVE
Walt Disney Pictures, Pixar Animation Studios; Walt Disney Pictures

b.    FRANKENWEENIE
Walt Disney Pictures; Walt Disney Pictures

c.    HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA
Columbia Pictures / Sony Pictures Animation; Sony Pictures Releasing

d.    RISE OF THE GUARDIANS
DreamWorks Animation LLC; Paramount Pictures

e.    WRECK-IT RALPH
Walt Disney Pictures, Walt Disney Animation Studios; Walt Disney Pictures

8.    BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

a.    AMOUR (AUSTRIA)
Les Films Du Losange, X Filme Creative Pool, Wega Film; Sony Pictures Classics

b.    AROYALAFFAIR (DENMARK)
(En kongelig affære) 
Zentropa Entertainment; Magnolia Pictures

c.    THE INTOUCHABLES (FRANCE)
(Les Intouchables) 
The WeinstenCompany, Quad Productions, Gaumont, TF1 Films Production, Ten Films, Chaocorp; The Weinstein Company

d.    KON-TIKI (NORWAY/UK/DENMARK)
Nordisk Film Production, Recorded Picture Company; The Weinstein Company

e.    RUST AND BONE (FRANCE)
(De rouille et d’os) 
Page 114, Why Not Productions; Sony Pictures Classics

9. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

a.    Amy Adams             THE MASTER

b.    Sally Field             LINCOLN

c.    Anne Hathaway     LES MISERABLES

d.    Helen Hunt         THE SESSIONS

e.    Nicole Kidman         THE PAPERBOY

10. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

a.    Alan Arkin                 ARGO

b.    Leonardo DiCaprio         DJANGO UNCHAINED

c.    Philip Seymour Hoffman  THE MASTER

d.    Tommy Lee Jones          LINCOLN

e.    Christoph Waltz         DJANGO UNCHAINED

11. BEST DIRECTOR – MOTION PICTURE

a.    Ben Affleck             ARGO

b.    Kathryn Bigelow         ZERO DARK THIRTY

c.    Ang Lee                 LIFE OF PI

d.    Steven Spielberg         LINCOLN

e.    Quentin Tarantino         DJANGO UNCHAINED

12. BEST SCREENPLAY – MOTION PICTURE

a.    Mark Boal                 ZERO DARK THIRTY

b.    Tony Kushner             LINCOLN

c.    David O. Russell         SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK

d.    Quentin Tarantino         DJANGO UNCHAINED

e.    CHRIS TERRIO             ARGO

13. BEST ORIGINAL SCORE – MOTION PICTURE

a.    MYCHAEL DANNA         LIFE OF PI

b.    Alexandre Desplat     ARGO

c.    Dario Marianelli         ANNA KARENINA

d.    TOM TYKWER,            CLOUD ATLAS

e.     JOHNNY KLIMEK,

f.    REINHOLD HEIL

g.    John Williams             LINCOLN

14. BEST ORIGINAL SONG – MOTION PICTURE

a.    “FOR YOU” — ACT OF VALOR
Music by: Monty Powell, Keith Urban Lyrics by: Monty Powell, Keith Urban

b.    “NOT RUNNING ANYMORE”—STAND UP GUYS
Music by: Jon Bon Jovi Lyrics by: Jon Bon Jovi

c.    “SAFE & SOUND” — THE HUNGER GAMES
Music by: Taylor Swift, John Paul White, Joy Williams, T Bone Burnett Lyrics by: Taylor Swift, John Paul White, Joy Williams, T Bone Burnett

d.    “SKYFALL”—SKYFALL
Music by: Adele, Paul Epworth Lyrics by: Adele, Paul Epworth

e.    “SUDDENLY” — LES MISERABLES
Music by: Claude-Michel Schonberg
Lyrics by: Alain Boublil, Claude-Michel Schonberg

15. BEST TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

a.    BREAKING BAD
AMC 
Sony Pictures Television

b.    BOARDWALK EMPIRE
HBO 
Leverage, Closest to the Hole Productions, Sikelia Productions and Cold Front Productions in association with HBO Entertainment

c.    DOWNTON ABBEY: SEASON 2
PBS 
A Carnival / Masterpiece Co-Production

d.    HOMELAND
SHOWTIME 
SHOWTIME, Teakwood Lane Productions, Cherry Pie Productions, Keshet, Fox 21

e.    THE NEWSROOM
HBO 
HBO Entertainment

16. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

a.    CONNIE BRITTON                 NASHVILLE

b.    Glenn Close                 DAMAGES

c.    Claire Danes                 HOMELAND

d.    MICHELLE DOCKERY             DOWNTON ABBEY: SEASON 2

e.    Julianna Margulies          THE GOOD WIFE

17. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

a.    Steve Buscemi                 BOARDWALK EMPIRE

b.    Bryan Cranston              BREAKING BAD

c.    Jeff Daniels                 THE NEWSROOM

d.    Jon Hamm                      MAD MEN

e.    Damian Lewis                 HOMELAND

18. BEST TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    THE BIG BANG THEORY
CBS 
Chuck Lorre Productions, Inc. in association with Warner Bros. Television

b.    EPISODES
SHOWTIME 
SHOWTIME, Hat Trick Productions, Crane Klarik Productions

c.    GIRLS
HBO 
Apatow Productions and I am Jenni Konner Productions in association with HBO Entertainment

d.    MODERN FAMILY
ABC 
Levitan-Lloyd Productions in association with Twentieth Century Fox Television

e.    SMASH
NBC

19. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    ZOOEY DESCHANEL                     NEW GIRL

b.    Julia Louis-Dreyfus                 VEEP

c.    LENA DUNHAM                         GIRLS

d.    Tina Fey                                 30 ROCK

e.    Amy Poehler                         PARKS AND RECREATION

20. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

a.    Alec Baldwin                         30 ROCK

b.    Don Cheadle                         HOUSE OF LIES

c.    LOUIS C.K.                             LOUIE

d.    Matt LeBlanc                         EPISODES

e.    Jim Parsons                             THE BIG BANG THEORY

21. BEST MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

a.    GAME CHANGE
HBO 
Playtone and Everyman Pictures in association with HBO Films

b.    THE GIRL
HBO 
A Wall to Wall, Warner Bros Entertainment GmbH, Moonlighting and BBC Production in association with HBO Films

c. HATFIELDS & MCCOYS 
HISTORY Thinkfactory Media in association with History

d.    THE HOUR
BBC AMERICA 
Kudos Film and Television/BBC America co-production

e.    POLITICAL ANIMALS
USA NETWORK Berlanti Productions and Laurence Mark Productions in association with Warner Horizon Television

22. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

a.    Nicole Kidman                     HEMINGWAY & GELLHORN

b.    Jessica Lange                     AMERICAN HORROR STORY: ASYLUM

c.    SIENNA MILLER                     THE GIRL

d.    Julianne Moore                 GAME CHANGE

e.    Sigourney Weaver                  POLITICAL ANIMALS

23. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

a.    Kevin Costner                     HATFIELDS & MCCOYS

b.    BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH              SHERLOCK (MASTERPIECE)

c.    Woody Harrelson                 GAME CHANGE

d.    TOBY JONES                         THE GIRL

e.    Clive Owen                         HEMINGWAY & GELLHORN

24. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

a.    HAYDEN PANETTIERE                 NASHVILLE

b.    ARCHIE PANJABI                     THE GOOD WIFE

c.    Sarah Paulson                     GAME CHANGE

d.    Maggie Smith                     DOWNTON ABBEY: SEASON 2

e.    Sofia Vergara                      MODERN FAMILY

25. BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

a.    MAX GREENFIELD                 NEW GIRL

b.    Ed Harris                         GAME CHANGE

c.    DANNY HUSTON                     MAGIC CITY

d.    Mandy Patinkin                 HOMELAND

e.    Eric Stonestreet                 MODERN FAMILY

 

The Critics’ Choice Awards are bestowed annually by the Broadcast Film Critics Association to honor the finest in cinematic achievement. Nominees are selected by written ballots in a week-long voting period, and are announced in December. The winners are revealed at the annual Critics’ Choice Awards ceremony in January. The awards are currently broadcast live on the VH1 television network. The 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009 Awards were at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, the 2010 event—renamed The Critics’ Choice Movie Awards—was held at the refurbished historic Hollywood Palladium on January 15, 2010. Special awards are given out at the discretion of the BFCA Board of Directors.

The Broadcast Film Critics Association prides itself on its ability to anticipate Academy Award nominations: between 1997 and 2004, the Critics’ Choice nominations predicted all but two of 35 Academy Award nominations for Best Picture. By comparison, the Golden Globe Awards were three times more likely to differ during the same period.[citation needed] However, the fact that the BFCA—which typically nominates nine or ten films for Best Film—chooses more than the five nominations of the Academy Awards and Golden Globes may account for some of this greater predictive power. The nominations for the 2013 awards will be announced on December 11, 2012.

The Broadcast Film Critics Association (BFCA) has announced the nominees for the 18th annual Critics’ Choice Movie Awards. The winners will be announced live at the Critics’ Choice Movie Awards ceremony on Thursday, January 10, 2013 from the Barker Hangar in Santa Monica, Calif. The show will broadcast live on The CW Network at 8:00 PM ET/PT.

Lincoln led the way, receiving a record 13 nominations, including Best Picture, while Les Misérables was next with 11, followed by Silver Linings Playbook with 10.

Here is a complete list of our nominees:

BEST PICTURE
Argo
Beasts of the Southern Wild
Django Unchained
Les Miserables
Life of Pi
Lincoln
The Master
Moonrise Kingdom
Silver Linings Playbook
Zero Dark Thirty

BEST ACTOR
Bradley Cooper – Silver Linings Playbook
Daniel Day-Lewis – Lincoln
John Hawkes – The Sessions
Hugh Jackman – Les Miserables
Joaquin Phoenix – The Master
Denzel Washington – Flight

BEST ACTRESS
Jessica Chastain – Zero Dark Thirty
Marion Cotillard – Rust and Bone
Jennifer Lawrence – Silver Linings Playbook
Emmanuelle Riva – Amour
Quvenzhane Wallis – Beasts of the Southern Wild
Naomi Watts – The Impossible

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Alan Arkin – Argo
Javier Bardem – Skyfall
Robert De Niro – Silver Linings Playbook
Philip Seymour Hoffman – The Master
Tommy Lee Jones – Lincoln
Matthew McConaughey – Magic Mike

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Amy Adams – The Master
Judi Dench – Skyfall
Ann Dowd – Compliance
Sally Field – Lincoln
Anne Hathaway – Les Miserables
Helen Hunt – The Sessions

BEST YOUNG ACTOR/ACTRESS
Elle Fanning – Ginger & Rosa
Kara Hayward – Moonrise Kingdom
Tom Holland – The Impossible
Logan Lerman – The Perks of Being a Wallflower
Suraj Sharma – Life of Pi
Quvenzhane Wallis – Beasts of the Southern Wild

BEST ACTING ENSEMBLE
Argo
The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel
Les Miserables
Lincoln
Moonrise Kingdom
Silver Linings Playbook

BEST DIRECTOR
Ben Affleck – Argo
Kathryn Bigelow – Zero Dark Thirty
Tom Hooper – Les Miserables
Ang Lee – Life of Pi
David O. Russell – Silver Linings Playbook
Steven Spielberg – Lincoln

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Quentin Tarantino – Django Unchained
John Gatins – Flight
Rian Johnson – Looper
Paul Thomas Anderson – The Master
Wes Anderson & Roman Coppola – Moonrise Kingdom
Mark Boal – Zero Dark Thirty

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Chris Terrio – Argo
Tony Kushner – Lincoln
David O. Russell – Silver Linings Playbook
David Magee – Life of Pi
Stephen Chbosky – The Perks of Being a Wallflower

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Life of Pi – Claudio Miranda
Lincoln – Janusz Kaminski
Les Miserables – Danny Cohen
The Master – Mihai Malaimare Jr.
Skyfall – Roger Deakins

BEST ART DIRECTION
Anna Karenina – Sarah Greenwood/Production Designer, Katie Spencer/Set Decorator
The Hobbit – Dan Hennah/Production Designer, Ra Vincent & Simon Bright/Set Decorators
Les Miserables – Eve Stewart/Production Designer, Anna Lynch-Robinson/Set Decorator
Life of Pi – David Gropman/Production Designer, Anna Pinnock/Set Decorator
Lincoln – Rick Carter/Production Designer, Jim Erickson/Set Decorator

BEST EDITING
Argo – William Goldenberg
Les Miserables – Melanie Ann Oliver, Chris Dickens
Life of Pi – Tim Squyres
Lincoln – Michael Kahn
Zero Dark Thirty – William Goldenberg, Dylan Tichenor

BEST COSTUME DESIGN
Anna Karenina – Jacqueline Durran
Cloud Atlas – Kym Barrett, Pierre-Yves Gayraud
The Hobbit – Bob Buck, Ann Maskrey, Richard Taylor
Les Miserables – Paco Delgado
Lincoln – Joanna Johnston

BEST MAKEUP
Cloud Atlas
The Hobbit
Les Miserables
Lincoln

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
The Avengers
Cloud Atlas
The Dark Knight Rises
The Hobbit
Life of Pi

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE
Brave
Frankenweenie
Madagascar 3
ParaNorman
Rise of the Guardians
Wreck-It Ralph

BEST ACTION MOVIE
The Avengers
The Dark Knight Rises
Looper
Skyfall

BEST ACTOR IN AN ACTION MOVIE
Christian Bale – The Dark Knight Rises
Daniel Craig – Skyfall
Robert Downey Jr. – The Avengers
Joseph Gordon-Levitt – Looper
Jake Gyllenhaal – End of Watch

BEST ACTRESS IN AN ACTION MOVIE
Emily Blunt – Looper
Gina Carano – Haywire
Judi Dench – Skyfall
Anne Hathaway – The Dark Knight Rises
Jennifer Lawrence – The Hunger Games

BEST COMEDY
Bernie
Silver Linings Playbook
Ted
This Is 40
21 Jump Street

BEST ACTOR IN A COMEDY
Jack Black – Bernie
Bradley Cooper – Silver Linings Playbook
Paul Rudd – This Is 40
Channing Tatum – 21 Jump Street
Mark Wahlberg – Ted

BEST ACTRESS IN A COMEDY
Mila Kunis – Ted
Jennifer Lawrence – Silver Linings Playbook
Shirley MacLaine – Bernie
Leslie Mann – This Is 40
Rebel Wilson – Pitch Perfect

BEST SCI-FI/HORROR MOVIE
Cabin in the Woods
Looper
Prometheus

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
Amour
The Intouchables
A Royal Affair
Rust and Bone

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
Bully
The Imposter
Queen of Versailles
Searching for Sugar Man
The Central Park Five
West of Memphis

BEST SONG
“For You” – performed by Keith Urban/written by Monty Powell & Keith Urban – Actor of Valor
“Skyfall” – performed by Adele/written by Adele Adkins & Paul Epworth – Skyfall
“Still Alive” – performed by Paul Williams/written by Paul Williams – Paul Williams Still Alive
“Suddenly” – performed by Hugh Jackman/written by Claude-Michel Schonberg & Alain Boublil & Herbert Kretzmer – Les Miserables
“Learn Me Right” – performed by Birdy with Mumford & Sons/written by Mumford & Sons – Brave

BEST SCORE
Argo – Alexandre Desplat
Life of Pi – Mychael Danna
Lincoln – John Williams
The Master – Jonny Greenwood
Moonrise Kingdom – Alexandre Desplat

 

 

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