Tag Archive: Trent Reznor


Image for Ten film soundtracks better than The Great Gatsby

Earlier today director Baz Luhrmann and executive producer Jay-Z released the soundtrack to The Great Gatsby and, on paper at least, it seems like a winner. Not only does it feature the likes of Florence and The MachineThe xxSia and Gotye, it’s got new material from Lana Del Rey and a host of covers: Beyonce andAndre 3000 doing Amy Winehouse’s ‘Back In Black’, Brian Ferry doing ‘Crazy in Love’ and Jack White’s take on U2’s ‘Love Is Blindness’ (which first appeared on a 2011 tribute album). But for The Great Gatsby to really cut through, it has to be more than just a compilation. Here are 10 soundtracks that not only sound good as a party playlist, but also conjure pivotal moments in their respective films. Listen to complete soundtracks here: http://bit.ly/Xurm0M

Trainspotting (1996)

Regarded as one of the best British films of the past 20 years Trainspotting, director Danny Boyle, used an A-list cast of musical talent to give the film that extra bit of punch (like it actually needed more!). Featuring tracks from David BowieLou ReedIggy Pop and Underworld, the CD release of the soundtrack was so successful they put out another disk – and it was just as good.

Soundtrack highlight: A three-way tie: the energetic intro scene featuring ‘Lust For Life’, Ewan McGregor OD’ing to ‘Perfect Day’ and Underworld’s ‘Born Slippy’ closing out the film.

Pulp Fiction (1994)

We all know Quentin Tarantino is the king of pop culture references, edgy dialogue and gore, but his impossibly good taste in music often gets overlooked. Featuring songs from Al Green (‘Let’s Stay Together’), Kool and the Gang (‘Jungle Boogie’) and Dusty Springfield (‘Son Of A Preacher Man’), not to mention Urge Overkill’s inspired cover of Neil Diamond’s ‘Girl, You’ll Be a Woman Soon’, _Pulp Fiction_’s soundtrack is as effortlessly cool as the film itself.

Soundtrack highlight: John Travolta and Uma Thurman dancing to Chuck Berry’s ‘You Never Can Tell’.

The Social Network (2010)

Who thought Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails would actually win an Oscar? But he deserves it for this brooding and ambient work – co-composed with Atticus Ross – that complemented the uneasy pace and tone of the film. The real genius of their score (and the script by Aaron Sorkin) is that it elevated a boring story about a bunch of geeks starting a website into a gripping film.

Soundtrack highlight: If you can pick a highlight out of a minimalist piano score, you’re doing one better than us.

Drive (2011)

The soundtrack to 2011’s Drive heavily featured Cliff Martinez – former guitarist for the likes of the Red Hot Chili Peppers and Captain Beefheart – who has now turned his attention to composing scores. His pulsating electro-pop aesthetic translated perfectly to the stretches of the film where heartthrob Ryan Gosling was on the road, escalating in intensity where the scene needed it to. The soundtrack also features a few great songs from the likes of Kavinsky, Chromatics and Desire, particularly ‘Under Your Spell’.

Soundtrack highlight: The infamous elevator scene featuring Brian Eno’s ambient ‘An Ending (Ascent)’.

Romeo + Juliet (1996)

Between Radiohead’s ‘Exit Music’, Butthole Surfers’ ‘Whatever (I Had a Dream)’ and Everclear’s ‘Local God’ nothing said “mid-’90s” quite like this soundtrack. Plus who would’ve thought that Garbage’s ‘#1 Crush’ could ever appear in a story written by Shakespeare? Or ‘Lovefool’ by The Cardigans, which became a hit single thanks to the film.

Soundtrack highlight: For the romantics: Des’ree’s ‘I’m Kissing You’ in the “fishtank scene”.

Judgement Night (1993)

The beginning of rap-rock for (better or worse), with every song on the soundtrack coupling a rock act with a hip-hop artist. There was the improbable Teenage Fanclub and De La Soul collaboration ‘Fallin’, Faith No Moreteaming up with Boo-Yaa T.R.I.B.E. for ‘Another Body Murdered’, Helmet and House of Pain doing ‘Just Another Victim’ (yes, they had songs other than ‘Jump Around’). The film itself is pretty unmemorable – it starred Emilio Estevez, Cuba Gooding Jr and Denis Leary as a bunch of mates who end up in the wrong part of town – but the soundtrack will stand the test of time.

Soundtrack highlight: The title track featuring Biohazard and Onyx nails the film’s gritty urban vibe.

Almost Famous (2000)

Like Tarantino, Cameron Crowe is another director that knows just when to drop the perfect song at the perfect time in one of his films (see: the “boombox scene” in Say Anything, or Tom Cruise belting out ‘Free Falling’ in Jerry Maguire). Almost Famous, which tells the (somewhat embellished) story of his early years as a Rolling Stone contributor, is like a nostalgia trip back into Crowe’s past – from The Beach Boys to Simon & Garfunkel, Yes to The Who. Even the songs by the film’s fictitious band Stillwater sound like they were writing four decades ago.

Soundtrack highlight: An entire tour bus belting out Elton John’s ‘Tiny Dancer’.

Singles (1992)

Another Cameron Crowe special. A movie about six people looking for love in Seattle, Singles helped spread the city’s nascent grunge scene to a national audience before it exploded into the mainstream via Nirvana. The film features some of the scene’s biggest names (Pearl Jam, Alice In Chains, Mudhoney and Soundgarden), a Chris Cornell solo track recorded on a four-track in his cupboard and some of Paul Westerberg’s better post-Replacements output (‘Waiting For Somebody’, ‘Dyslexic Heart’). Though uncredited, there’s a snippet of Jane’s Addiction’s ‘Three Days’ when Bridget Fonda opens a fridge.

Soundtrack highlight: The first airing of Soundgarden’s Spoonman two years before its release.

Friday (1995)

Starring Chris Tucker and Ice Cube, stoner comedy Friday was released just as the West Coast hip-hop movement was hitting its peak. As a result the film is soundtracked by California’s finest, with contributions from Cypress HillDr DreMack 10 and Cube himself, providing its title track. Amid all the rap was the inclusion of some smoother jams from the likes of Rick James and Bootsy Collins.

Soundtrack highlight: Hands down: Ice Cube and Chris Tucker rolling a fat one to the smooth stylings of Rick James’ ‘Mary Jane’.

Forrest Gump (1994)

An epic film with a suitably epic soundtrack. Thirty-two tracks with not one original song (bar the opening suite) among them, Forrest Gump’s score featured all the ‘60 to ‘70s big guns: Aretha FranklinCreedence Clearwater RevivalThe Beach BoysElvis. Much like the film itself, the list just goes on, and on, and on.

Soundtrack highlight: Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Fortunate Son’ as Forrest lands in Vietnam.

DAVE GROHL VS RICK RUBIN

3

The two legends come together to worship at the altar of Sound City – LA’s greatest, dirtiest, most rock’n’roll studio

When Nirvana pulled into the parking lot of Sound City in May 1991, they couldn’t exactly remember how they had chosen this crumbling recording studio nestled deep in the beige dystopia of Van Nuys, Los Angeles. A couple of things struck them immediately about the former Vox amp factory: one, they’d played in dive bars that looked cleaner; and two, the fumes from the Budweiser brewery down the street made them gag every time they inhaled. But reason prevailed: if it was good enough for Fleetwood Mac, the Grateful Dead and Neil Young, it was good enough for them.

Sixteen days later, the three Seattle punks piled back into their van for the long drive home. They didn’t know it then of course, but within six months the Nevermind sessions would ignite a global youth revolution and go on to sell an estimated 40 million copies. The album would also reverse the fortunes of Sound City, which went from the verge of bankruptcy to being overrun with bands like Rage Against the MachineTool and Weezer, each keen to take a sip from the grungy golden chalice.

Three years on, Rick Rubin made the 15-mile drive from his Hollywood chateau to the Sound City stronghold. The Def Jam co-founder was already firmly established as the producer of his generation, thanks to sonic skirmishes with Slayer, Run-DMC, the Beastie Boys and the Red Hot Chili Peppers, but he had never experienced this particular studio’s grimy charms for himself. After conquering his fear of sitting down on the crusty furniture, the 31-year-old bearded guru fired up the vintage Neve 8028 console, gave southern rock royalty Tom Petty the thumbs-up and pressed record. It kickstarted a relationship with the accidental hit-factory that would see him return time and time again to craft jams with titans such as Johnny Cash, Metallica and the Chili Pepper crew.

In 2011, when Sound City’s owners finally surrendered to the Pro Tools revolution, they had no option but to sell off their vintage analogue equipment. Dave Grohl, whose nostalgic emotional attachment to Rupert Neve’s sound desk overrode any professional concerns about the amount of archaic cocaine clogging up its faders, decided to take the console off their hands. More than just a token gesture, it galvanised him to direct Sound City, a feature-length documentary about the studio’s history that in turn inspired Real to Reel, an allstar tribute album featuring Stevie Nicks, Trent Reznor, Josh Homme, Lee Ving and other assorted alumni.

A few days before Grohl’s cinematic debut premiered in Hollywood Boulevard, Rick Rubin, one of the film’s most enlightening interviewees, made a rare pilgrimage back up the 405 Freeway to reminisce with the former Nirvana drummer about LA’s unintentional musical mecca. Turning the lights down low in the control room of Grohl’s Studio 606, the two friends sat once more in front of the coveted Neve 8028 and invited Dazed to pull up a pew…

Dazed & Confused: Mick Fleetwood describes Sound City as ‘a church’. How would you both describe it?
Rick Rubin: I spent a lot of time there. I wouldn’t describe it as a church. We had spiritual things happen, but it was really not a nice place to be. It was filthy. It felt like it didn’t have to be that bad. It almost seemed like you had to really be an edgy person to let it be like that. It was like, how do we make it more funky?

Dave Grohl: When Mick Fleetwood first went there it was state of the art… in 1973. They had just built it, and had this new brown carpet and a new couch, so he was like, ‘It was great.’ That’s why they decided to make a record there. The further you go down the line, the more people’s first impressions turned into exactly what we experienced. The owners made a million dollars from producing the Rick Springfield record, but when you watch the film you’re like, ‘Where the fuck did all that money go? What the fuck did you do with that? You didn’t even paint the fucking walls!’ When Nirvana first got there, they were really close to closing down. They had a manager that was dealing drugs and nobody knew what the fuck was going on. It was cheap though.

D&C: Were the owners scared to change anything in case it ruined the sound?
DG: No one was going to re-floor the room, because everyone was afraid that they would lose what was awesome about Sound City. It might also be total neglect.

RR: It looked like neglect. In places where the sound didn’t matter, say the bathrooms, there were 20 sockets for light bulbs. And I don’t remember at any point more than, like, three light bulbs in those 20 sockets. That had nothing to do with the sound in the studio. (laughs)

DG: I always felt like it was a specific type of person that went to Sound City. And because of that, there was something specific that it represented. You wouldn’t go there and find fucking Lady Gaga making a record. You would find a band like Rage Against the Machine. We found a video of them making (their self-titled debut) in there with a bunch of their friends watching them. In the film we go from the audio of the album and fade into the audio from the one mic on the video camera and it’s the same fucking take. That rawness was exactly what Sound City was about.

DC220_118-1

D&C: Do you think that its griminess also helped to ground the egos of the world’s biggest rock stars?
RR: I think everyone was willing to put up with being at Sound City because of how good it sounded. It’s a hard thing to find, really; where you can set up in a room and have it sound like how you sound. Someone said that it was because it was so poorly built. The studio didn’t add anything to the sound. It was like a barn. It wasn’t built to studio standards. It’s just sort of a big, empty space that was flimsy enough that it didn’t really contain the sound. So it allowed the music to breathe. It wasn’t on purpose.

DG: A block away there’s a Best Western hotel next to a Taco Bell. When Metallica made an album there, James Hetfield stayed at the Best Western. James fucking Hetfield stayed at that fucking shithole hotel so that he could be two blocks away from the best-sounding room in the fucking world, you know. People go to great lengths. My studio, where we are now, might be the only one that’s farther out.

RR: Unless you were going to Sound City you would never go to this place, this area. It’s in the middle of nowhere.

DG: I live nearby, but that’s the only reason I have my studio here. Otherwise you wouldn’t come to the Valley. But there’s something to be said for working in studios that aren’t in the middle of everything. I’ve never made an album in New York City. I can’t even imagine turning off the world and walking into a room knowing that on the other side of that wall is Fifth Avenue. I like to be somewhere where I’m a little bit isolated. I don’t need to go to fucking Hawaii to make a record. That wasn’t one of the things I did like about Sound City: I felt like once I was there I had to work because I couldn’t go take a break. It almost amplified that work ethic because, what are you gonna do? Hang out there all day long? Not really.

I HAVE A LOT OF PATIENCE. WHAT WE’RE LOOKING FOR ISN’T IN ANYONE’S CONTROL. NONE OF US CAN MAKE THIS GREAT THING HAPPEN. WAITING IS KIND OF THE JOB

RR: Absolutely. It was a place to come, do your work and get out as quickly as possible. Another part of it that drew us in was the equipment. As technology continued, in theory, to improve, things kept changing and the changes weren’t always for the better. And it didn’t always suit rock’n’roll, which was more often than not what we were recording. So it was hard to find studios that were more traditional. It wasn’t really production; it was about documenting a moment. Sound City was a really great place to document a moment.

DG: The first song we recorded there was ‘In Bloom’. We set up, tuned up and got big sounds. I’d never heard my drums sound like that before. It was the first time we’d heard Nirvana sound like that. It didn’t sound like Bleach, you know. It didn’t sound like the Peel sessions we’d done. It didn’t sound like any of the demos. It sounded like Nevermind. And when I heard the toms, the kick and the snare on ‘In Bloom’ – it was an instrumental take, I don’t even know if Kurt did a guide vocal – our jaws dropped, because it sounded real, it sounded aggressive, it sounded really powerful. After what first day we knew it was gonna be alright. We blew through everything in 16 days. That made the greatest impression on me.

RR: Sound City had such a limited amount of gear that there wasn’t much opportunity to change the way anything sounded. It was pretty much limited to microphones and this Neve console, which, luckily, doesn’t change stuff much. You don’t really have an option but to sound like what you sound like.

DG: There’s a really great quote from (Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers guitarist) Benmont Tench in the movie where he says, ‘It’s cruel, because you’d go to the control room and listen to yourself and just think “I suck”, which pushed you to be better’ That was a good thing.

D&C: When you have one of those days when you suck, how do you get over it?
DG: 
I can’t even imagine your job, Rick! When I go in to record something, I’ll do it until I get it. I have a hard time walking away from things, so if I’m trying to get it, I might want to throw something through a fucking window but I work hard until I get it. I’ll sit there and look at whoever is producing us and I feel so sorry for them ’cause I know they just want to take my hands and make them do what they need to do.

WHEN I GO IN TO RECORD SOMETHING, I’LL DO IT UNTIL I GET IT. I MIGHT WANT TO THROW SOMETHING THROUGH A FUCKING WINDOW BUT I WORK HARD UNTIL I GET IT

RR: I just have a lot of patience. You have to, becausewhat we’re looking for isn’t in anyone’s control. It’s like everyone’s there with the same intention to make this great thing happen but none of us can make that great thing happen. The closest comparison I can make to it would be fishing. When you go fishing you could fish all day and not catch anything, but you have a much better chance of catching fish if you’re fishing all day than if you’re not fishing all day. Some days we’ll play it three times, and it’s all great. Sometimes we’ll play it 100 times and it never gets great. Waiting is kind of the job.

DG: A lot of musicians get red-light fever; they get scared.

RR: It’s anxiety.

DG: You could sit through a song and do a perfect rehearsal, and then hit record and everything changes.

RR: Stage fright.

DG: When we were kids and we knew someone with a studio that had a reel of tape, you couldn’t wait to get over there to record something. You weren’t afraid to hit record when you were 16. It was like, ‘Fuck, we’re gonna record, this is amazing. I get to record a song.’ I still feel the same way.

RR: Usually when I start a new project there’s a fear of the unknown; maybe it’s a band I’ve never been in the studio with before.People are so different. It’s almost like you need to go through the process, discover and unlock what it is that makes that band that band. And a lot of times they don’t know it. More often than not they don’t know it. But over time you start seeing patterns of things that work and don’t work and why. It does seem like the more prepared you are before you go into the studio, the better the experience. If the band really knows what they’re doing, you save a great deal of time. The idea of going into a studio to write an album seems like a bad idea. You’re never focused on getting a great performance because you’re still trying to figure out what you’re going to do.

DC220_119-1

D&C: On the flipside, someone like Jay-Z has it all in his head. It must be amazing to witness, but as a producer you can’t really prepare for that, can you?
RR: It’s about getting the music right, and then that inspires him to do the vocals. He’ll sit back in the corner and he’ll play the track over and over and over again, probably for a half hour, 45 minutes, an hour – almost to the point where you don’t even realise he’s there. It’s just like this monotonous thing going on, and then all of a sudden he jumps up and he’s like, ‘I got it,’ and he runs in the other room and does a complicated verse. It’s really unbelievable. And then he’ll do it, and then he’ll do it again and it’ll be different. The words will be pretty much the same but the phrasing will be different and the accents will be different. Imagine that you’ve written a solo and then you play it, like, different ways; that’s kind of what he does with his vocals. Unbelievable.

D&C: Rick, you have a stuffed bison in your home studio. What’s the weirdest thing you’ve both encountered in other studios?
RR: This guy called Alan (Dickson) from Grandmaster in Hollywood.

DG: (laughs) I remember walking into a studio at Grandmaster and it had a calendar up on the wall. It said ‘Korn’ on it, and they had just been in the studio for a week. I said, ‘Wow, what did Korn record here?’ And they said, ‘Korn didn’t record here.’ So I replied, ‘What’s this you’ve got on the fucking calendar then?’, and they said, ‘No, that’s “Porn”. We film porn here.’ All of a sudden I didn’t want to touch anything. I saw one of the pornos, it was called Cum Bandits, a parody of Time Bandits. They had a bathtub in the studio which turned into a portal to another dimension. That was a little weird.

D&C: Do you think any babies have been made on this beloved Neve desk of yours?
DG: Dude, when we brought this over here, my poor friend Lou had to spend about a week going through this thing with a toothbrush just to get the cocaine and the fried chicken out of it. Fuck, yeah. It’s funny, I didn’t want to modify the board. All I wanted to do was yank it out of there, plug it back in, and make sure that it was good to go. You get worried that the years of filth might have something to do with the way it sounds. Mike from the Heartbreakers emailed me to say, ‘Oh, by the way, if you find any white powder in that board it’s my medicine. Return it immediately.’ (laughs)

RR: I can’t even imagine how many things I spilled on this board. have sex, drugs and Rock’n’Roll disappeared from today’s studio culture?

DG: No.

RR: Not for The Foo Fighters. (laughs) They fly the flag.

D&C: Rick, were you upset that Dave got his hands on SOUND CITY’s Neve board?
RR: Not at all. I’m glad that he got it and a movie got to be made about Sound City because of it, which never would have happened if I had bought it. I already have a couple of similar boards. I was tempted but then felt like it would be a disservice because, as Dave says in the film, he knew that if he got it, it wouldn’t sit bubble wrapped in storage somewhere, and if I did, it probably would. I have an extra Neve sitting up on its side in my garage, so this would be next to that and it would be doing a disservice to what this is.

DG: It’s one of the funny things about a board; you look at this board and it seems so archaic, considering what people use to make albums now. A lot of people consider it obsolete, but it still fucking works. This thing will probably work longer than I’ll be alive. In 30 or 40 years from now you will probably still be able to make an album on this board. And as much as it might seem impractical and it might seem obsolete, it still does what it’s supposed to do.

RR: And it will probably sound better than anything new that comes out and replaces it.

DG: Things that try to emulate or simulate what this board does, you know, they are more practical and they are more accessible and if you can’t fit one of these into your living room it’s probably the closest thing you’re going to get. But still, what this does is what only this really does.

DC220_121-1

D&C: Do you think that the fabric of a studio – the building and equipment – hold a sound memory that affects subsequent recordings?
RR:
 For sure. How formal or how casual the space is can really influence everything. We recorded Johnny Cash in my living room. It couldn’t have been more casual. And I feel like that lack of pressure creates a certain feeling, and the same I’m sure is true with concerts. If you do a concert in the middle of nowhere and that’s one gig, and the next night you’re playing at Madison Square Garden…

DG: It’s different.

RR: …because it’s Madison Square Garden. The Royal Albert Hall is different to playing somewhere in the Midlands. Even if it’s just your perception of it, everything changes. DG: I really believe that the experience of making an album influences the end result. On our second Foo Fighters album I was going through a fucking divorce, I was living in my friend’s back room, getting pissed on at night by his fucking dog, in a sleeping bag, and I would go to the studio and write a song that was so fucking heartbreaking that I can’t even listen to some of that music because it brings me back to how miserable I was. So that experience totally influenced that album.

RR: Plus the fact that it was recorded at Grandmaster (laughs)
DG: (laughs) That definitely influenced a lot of shit in itself. Whether it’s the history of a room, or whether it’s the ghosts in the fucking room, whatever you choose to believe, if you want to capture a moment, something real, then you just have to be open to everything.

D&C: Who’s made you BOTH step up your game in the studio?
DG: It’s hard to top Paul McCartney. When Paul comes in to your studio and he’s brought his Hofner bass, ‘The Bass’, and he’s brought his Les Paul, ‘The Les Paul’, and a guitar made out of a cigar box, and he decides to play the guitar made out of the cigar box, you realise, ‘That’s badass. I have to be badass, too. I can’t just play it like I’m playing with my friends down the street. I have to be great right now.’ I’m lucky, I’ve jammed with some crazy fucking wicked musicians.

RR: 
I’ve gotten to work with amazing people. I would say usually we get to a point before we get into the studio where there isn’t that sense of anxiety or nervousness of who they are because I don’t think it would be as productive in the studio if that was the case. But maybe meeting someone like Neil Young for the first time made me anxious. But then when you get to hang out with Neil Young it’s all good. We were supposed to record together and then he cut off a piece of his finger and couldn’t play guitar. But he still had the studio booked, so we went in and played this harmonica through his guitar amp…

Read more here: Dave Grohl Vs Rick Rubin | Dazed Digital.

Photos by John Kilar

Screen Shot 2013-03-07 at 11.47.45 AM

Yesterday, we posted the stream for Dave GrohlTrent Reznor, and Josh Homme’s epic collaboration, “Mantra”, which they recorded together for the soundtrack to Grohl’sSound City documentary. Today, Rolling Stone brings us the track’s corresponding video, featuring in-studio footage of the trio’s recording session. Watch it here, or below.

The soundtrack, Sound City: Real to Reel , officially hits stores March 12th via Grohl’s own Roswell Records. Read more here: http://bit.ly/14yzLQI

 

Trent Reznor’s How to destroy angels_ Releases “How Long” Video, Album Details

Through a clip directed by creative group Shynola—which has worked with Radiohead, Queens of the Stone Age, Blur and ColdplayTrent Reznor’s How to destroy angels_ released a new track, titled “How Long?” Compared to what we’ve heard from the group before—which also features Mariqueen Maandig and frequent Reznor collaborator Atticus Ross—it’s melodically a bit more uplifting, even if the video’s gritty, grey atmosphere is absolutely terrifying.

With the video release also came full details on the album, which is titled Welcome Oblivion. The album is set for a March 5 release through Columbia and features 13 tracks (15 if you purchase the vinyl edition, which has a slightly different track order).

You can watch “How Long” in the video player here

You can also check out Welcome Oblivion’s tracklist.

Tracklist (CD version)
1 The wake-up
2 Keep it together
3 And the sky began to scream
4 Welcome oblivion
5 Ice age
6 On the wing
7 Too late, all gone
8 How long?
9 Strings and attractors
10 We fade away
11 Recursive self-improvement
12 The loop closes
13 Hallowed ground

Tracklist (Vinyl version)
1 The wake-up
2 Keep it together
3 And the sky began to scream
4 Ice age
5 Welcome oblivion
6 On the wing
7 Too late, all gone
8 The province of fear
9 How long?
10 Strings and attractors
11 Recursive self-improvement
12 Unintended consequences
13 We fade away
14 The loop closes
15 Hallowed ground

 

by tyler kane for nprmusic.com

tyler kane

M_SoundCityMoviePoster

Grohl’s passion for music is unbridled as he talks to musicians and singers like Neil Young, Stevie Nicks, Rick Springfield, Trent Reznor and more, recounting the history of the studio where he and his friends from Nirvana showed up to record Nevermind, one of the most iconic rock albums of all time. His reaction to some of the stories and the time he spends reflecting on the studio’s rise and fall (which happened twice) is like a kid in a candy shop. For this portion of the documentary, Grohl’s varying style of filming the interviews was refreshing from talking heads looking off camera to Grohl sitting in the room with a particular subject or just chilling in a recording studio, Ethan Anderton wrote for the firstshowing.net. These are stories from rock legends about rock history. It doesn’t get much better than that.

Sound City

For the entire duration of Sound City, I had a big goofy smile on my face, and even had a couple tears settle in my eyes hearing some of these great musical icons talk about the start of their careers. This is all made possible by Dave Grohl, a guy who made this documentary as a tribute to all those who keep making music with real people, whether it’s in their garage or in a makeshift studio. It’s about not letting technology do all the work and act as a crutch for shortcoming in talent. Grohl isn’t cocky, but he’s respectful of his craft, and mixes no nonsense about his love for Sound City. The documentary isn’t perfect, but Sound City is a revelation full of musical passion, love, raw energy and a fascinating chronicle of an unlikely historical music studio and the people who made it possible.

Read more review about the movie here: http://bit.ly/UTr8h9

–images from firstshowing.net

_sound_city_single_cover

“From Can to Can’t”, the collaboration between Slipknot and Stone Sour frontman Corey Taylor (pictured left) and Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl, is available for streaming in the YouTube clip below.

The song will appear on Sound City: Real To Reel, the soundtrack to Grohl’s upcoming documentary, Sound City. The track also features Cheap Trick guitarist Rick Nielsen and bassist Scott Reeder, formerly of Kyuss. The soundtrack also includes contributions from Stevie Nicks, Trent Reznor, Rick Springfield, Tim Commerford and Brad Wilk of Rage Against the Machine, Joshua Homme of Queens of the Stone Age, and more.

— source: kerrang magazine image from mtv.rs

DAVE GROHL REVEALS ‘SOUND CITY’ DOCUMENTARY CAST + SOUNDTRACK DETAILS

For the better part of the last year, Foo Fightersleader Dave Grohl has been building the buzz while compiling and editing footage for his ‘Sound City‘ documentary about the famous Los Angeles music studio and the Neve console where many of rock’s great albums have been made. Now fans can really get excited as the full cast for the film and details of what songs were recorded for the movie’s soundtrack have been revealed.
M_SoundCityMoviePoster

Audiences got their first taste of the ‘Sound City’ soundtrack Wednesday night (Dec. 12) when the surviving members of Nirvana joined Paul McCartney onstage at the 12-12-12 Hurricane Sandy benefit to perform ‘Cut Me Some Slack.’ The tune was just made available online and will serve as the lead single from the soundtrack. In addition to McCartney, Grohl teamed up with members of Black Rebel Motorcycle ClubQueens of the Stone AgeRage Against the Machine, Foo Fighters,Kyuss and Cheap Trick, as well as singers Stevie Nicks, Rick SpringfieldTrent Reznor, Lee Ving and Corey Taylor and violinist Jessy Greene to record songs for the soundtrack. You can currently pre-order the disc here ahead of its March 12 release date.

As for the film’s cast, it includes hard rock and metal performers such as Foo Fighters’ Taylor Hawkins, Chris Shiflett, Rami Jaffe, Pat Smear, and Nate Mendel, Nirvana’s Krist NovoselicSlipknot and Stone Sour‘s Corey Taylor, Metallica‘s Lars Ulrich, Rage Against the Machine’s Tim Commerford and Brad WilkNine Inch Nails‘ Trent Reznor, Queens of the Stone Age’s Joshua Homme and Alain Johannes, Ratt‘s Stephen Pearcy and Warren DeMartini, Heaven and Hell‘s Vinny Appice and Fear’s Lee Ving.

On the alternative side, the film features The Pixies‘ Frank Black, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club’s Robert Levon Been and Weezer‘s Rivers Cuomo, Brian Bell and Pat Wilson. There’s also classic rock representation from Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers’ Tom Petty, Mike Campbell and Benmont Tench, Fleetwood Mac‘s Stevie Nicks, Mick Fleetwood and Lindsey BuckinghamREO Speedwagon‘s Kevin Cronin, John Fogerty and Pat Benatar guitarist Neil Giraldo. Plus, there’s ’70s and ’80s pop stars like Rick Springfield and Barry Manilow involved.

The film features session musicians like violinist Jessy Greene and drummer Jim Keltner as well as producers and engineers Rick Rubin, Butch Vig, Joe Barresi, Chris Goss, James Brown, Keith Olsen, Jim Scott, Ross Robinson and Nick Raskulinecz.

In addition, console maker Rupert Neve, who is responsible for the board that most of the records were made on, appears in the movie, as do Sound City staffers Sandy Skeeter, Shivaun O’Brien, Paula Salvatore and Tom Skeeter.

The ‘Sound City’ film is due for digital release on Feb. 1.

‘Sound City’ Soundtrack Track Listing:
1. ‘Heaven and All’ – Dave Grohl with Black Rebel Motorcycle Club’s Robert Levon Been and Peter Hayes
2. ‘Time Slowing Down’ – Dave Grohl with Queens of the Stone Age’s Chris Goss and Rage Against the Machine’s Tim Commerford and Brad Wilk
3. ‘You Can’t Fix This’ – Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl, Rami Jaffe and Taylor Hawkins with Stevie Nicks
4. ‘The Man That Never Was’ – Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl, Taylor Hawkins, Nate Mendel and Pat Smear with Rick Springfield
5. ‘Your Wife Is Calling’ – Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl, Taylor Hawkins and Pat Smear with Queens of the Stone Age’s Alain Johannes and Fear’s Lee Ving
6. ‘From Can to Can’t’ – Dave Grohl with Slipknot and Stone Sour’s Corey Taylor, Cheap Trick’s Rick Nielsen and Kyuss’ Scott Reeder
7. ‘Centipede’ – Dave Grohl with Queens of the Stone Age’s Joshua Homme, Chris Goss and Alain Johannes
8. ‘A Trick With No Sleeve’ – Dave Grohl with Queens of the Stone Age’s Joshua Homme and Alain Johannes
9. ‘Cut Me Some Slack’ – Paul McCartney with Nirvana’s Dave Grohl, Krist Novoselic and Pat Smear
10. ‘Once Upon a Time … The End’ – Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl and Rami Jaffe with violinist Jessy Greene and drummer Jim Keltner
11. ‘Mantra’ – Dave Grohl with Queens of the Stone Age’s Joshua Homme and Nine Inch Nails’ Trent Reznor

by Chad Childers for loudwire.com

Musical Memories With Mick Fleetwood from Fleetwood Mac

Musical Memories With Lars Ulrich from Metallica

Musical Memories With Josh Homme from Queen of the Stone Age

Musical Memories With Butch Vig from Garbage and producer of “Nevermind” album

http://www.youtube.com/watchfeature=player_embedded&v=JmwWNBr59rk

Musical Memories With Rick Rubin

Musical Memories With Trent Reznor

Musical Memories With Weezer

Musical Memories With Corey Taylor

taken from: cutmesomeslack.net and http://www.soundcitymovie.com

%d bloggers like this: