Tag Archive: Pink Floyd


roger waters israel boycott
Roger Waters wants you to lend him your ears / Photo by Getty Images

Pink Floyd singer convinced Stevie Wonder to cancel gig

In what’s becoming an annual tradition for the curmudgeonly former Pink Floyd frontman, Roger Waters has once again asked his fellow musicians to refrain from performing in Israel. For years, Waters — who is at the forefront of the BDS (Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions) movement — has raged against Israel and its allies over their treatment of Palestine. While Waters initially hoped music would help mollify this ancient turf war, he doesn’t see that happening anytime soon, so instead he’s called upon musicians to boycott the country altogether. “They are running riot and it seems unlikely that running over there and playing the violin will have any lasting effect,” Waters told Electronic Intifada (via Rolling Stone).

This isn’t Waters first time running afoul with the country. Back in 2006, Waters relocated a tour date from Tel Aviv to the small town of Neve Shalom, where Palestinians and Israelis peacefully coexist, to voice his disapproval of the Israelis’ handling of Palestine. He also spray-painted the lyric “We don’t need no thought control” on the Israeli side of the West Bank wall. In 2010, during his tour celebrating The Wall, Waters’ concert projected imagery of Star of Davids morphing into dollar signs and dropped bombs, which drew the ire of the Anti-Defamation League. Then in 2011, Waters asked his fellow musicians to boycott playing Israel until the West Bank barrier came down. While that plea was largely ignored, Waters’ latest effort to get an artistic boycott of Israel going has convinced at least one person to refrain from playing there: Stevie Wonder.

Wonder was scheduled to perform in front of the Israeli Defense Forces this past December, but Waters convinced the singer to cancel his appearance. “I wrote a letter to [Wonder] saying that this would be like playing a police ball in Johannesburg the day after the Sharpeville massacre in 1960. It wouldn’t be a great thing to do, particularly as he was meant to be a UN ambassador for peace,” Waters told Electronic Intifada. “It wasn’t just me. Desmond Tutu also wrote a letter.” Waters  said that he hopes E Street Band guitarist Steven Van Zandt, who penned the all-star Artists United Against Apartheid‘s protest track “Sun City,” will join him in his crusade.

While Waters is probably pumped that Lollapalooza Israel was canceled, he might be bummed to hear that Barbra Streisand and Alicia Keys have elected to perform in Israel this summer despite BDS pressure. Read more here: http://go.spin.com/YAjTdV

 

It begins with a heartbeat. Released in 1973, The Dark Side of the Moon was Pink Floyd‘s eighth studio album. It would become one of the best-selling albums of all time, and its iconic cover image still hangs in college dormitories everywhere.

The record turned 40 this week. To mark the occasion, Weekend Edition asked All Songs Considered hosts Robin Hilton and Bob Boilen where they were when they heard Dark Side for the first time. Hear the full version of this story by clicking the audio link on this page.


BOB BOILEN: Back in 1972, I worked in record stores in Rockville, Md., and a huge Pink Floyd fan. They were coming to the Kennedy Center, and I was totally, totally psyched. My hair was down on my shoulders, much like the band members. I’d give anything to have that hair back.

They came out and performed this piece of music. Everybody in the audience, no doubt, their jaws just dropped. You had no idea what it was — and you have to understand, in 1972, if you don’t know what it is, there’s nowhere to look it up. It was like, “OK, when am I ever going to hear this amazing music again?”

It was nearly a year later. The truck that was carrying that record, I knew where it was gonna show up so I could get the record, like, four hours earlier than I would have had I waited for it to come to the store I worked in.

ROBIN HILTON: I was probably 12 years old, and I was with a friend who had brought the record over. We were playing chess, and it just blew my little mind.

I remember the song “Time.” I can’t tell you how many college roommates I awakened in the middle of the night by blasting the alarm clocks going off. There’s this line in the song “Time” that still resonates with me today. I still think of it all the time, it says, “You’re young and life is long and there’s time to kill today.” Boy, the older I get, that sure turns out to be true.

It was so crazy to imagine how they could even pull this off; technically, how could they create these sounds? We’re hearing so much crazy stuff now in music and nobody gives it any thought — because you can do anything now, right? But when I listen to Dark Side of the Moon now, 40 years later, it still sounds fresh.

Read more about Pink Floyd here: http://n.pr/WxKDRd

 

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The multiplatinum songbird will be performing her hit song “Skyfall” at the Academy Awards next month, the show’s organizers announced Wednesday, eonline.com reported

“Skyfall” single was recorded at Abbey Road Studios in London, where famous albums were previously created by The Beatles and Pink Floyd. It was released on October 5 (Global James Bond day), and it debuted at #8 on the Billboard Hot 100. It is the first Bong song nominated for an Oscar since “For Your Eyes Only” in 1981. The album is also the highest charting since 1985’s A VIEW TO A KILL. It is the second Bond soundtrack in the franchise’s 50-year history to not feature the title track on the album and is solely comprised of the Oscar-nominated score of Thomas Newman.

 

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I’d never seen this rather splendid documentary on Kate Bush before. Made for German television in 1980, Kate Bush in Concert captures what was, and still is so irrepressible about the pioneering singer and performer, and explains the delightful (and naive) charm that caused so many young virginal fans to pine for her. Mixing live performance with an interview, in which we hear how Kate’s brothers’ taste in Prog Rock (Pink Fairies and Pink Floyd) and Folk Music that inspired her, and explaining the difference between her on-stage and off-stage persona.

‘When I perform, there’s just something that happens in me, it just takes over. It’s like suddenly feeling you’ve leapt into another structure, almost like another person, and you just do it. But when I’m not working, it’s me and I certainly wouldn’t dance around a table and sing.’

Och, well, there goes another wee fantasy of Ms Bush dancing and singing around a homely kitchen whilst baking fruit scones.

 

–source from dangerousmind.net with big thanks to john kowalski

Roger Waters + David Gilmour: Comfortably Numb, Live, O2 Arena 2011

 

During tonight’s 12-12-12 Concert for Sandy Relief at New York City’s Madison Square Garden, some amazing, you-had-to-be-there pairings took place on the venue’s historic stage. Case in point: Roger Waters of Pink Floyd fame performing ‘Comfortably Numb’ with Pearl Jam singer Eddie Vedder.

Vedder lent his vibrato to the song’s choruses, adding his signature style to the Floyd classic. It was a haunting performance, one that will stay with viewers for days. Vedder and Waters did not interact much, but they didn’t need to. Their voices did all the work, and their chemistry as two legendary rock artists meshed perfectly. Better still, it was for a good cause.

Vedder sang the song like he wrote it, his emotive voice adding another layer of power and heft to the song’s already weighty lyrics. (diffuser.fm)

Pink Floyd’s Roger Waters talks about how Eddie Vedder came to join him onstage for “Comfortably Numb.”

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