Tag Archive: Nirvana


DAVE GROHL VS RICK RUBIN

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The two legends come together to worship at the altar of Sound City – LA’s greatest, dirtiest, most rock’n’roll studio

When Nirvana pulled into the parking lot of Sound City in May 1991, they couldn’t exactly remember how they had chosen this crumbling recording studio nestled deep in the beige dystopia of Van Nuys, Los Angeles. A couple of things struck them immediately about the former Vox amp factory: one, they’d played in dive bars that looked cleaner; and two, the fumes from the Budweiser brewery down the street made them gag every time they inhaled. But reason prevailed: if it was good enough for Fleetwood Mac, the Grateful Dead and Neil Young, it was good enough for them.

Sixteen days later, the three Seattle punks piled back into their van for the long drive home. They didn’t know it then of course, but within six months the Nevermind sessions would ignite a global youth revolution and go on to sell an estimated 40 million copies. The album would also reverse the fortunes of Sound City, which went from the verge of bankruptcy to being overrun with bands like Rage Against the MachineTool and Weezer, each keen to take a sip from the grungy golden chalice.

Three years on, Rick Rubin made the 15-mile drive from his Hollywood chateau to the Sound City stronghold. The Def Jam co-founder was already firmly established as the producer of his generation, thanks to sonic skirmishes with Slayer, Run-DMC, the Beastie Boys and the Red Hot Chili Peppers, but he had never experienced this particular studio’s grimy charms for himself. After conquering his fear of sitting down on the crusty furniture, the 31-year-old bearded guru fired up the vintage Neve 8028 console, gave southern rock royalty Tom Petty the thumbs-up and pressed record. It kickstarted a relationship with the accidental hit-factory that would see him return time and time again to craft jams with titans such as Johnny Cash, Metallica and the Chili Pepper crew.

In 2011, when Sound City’s owners finally surrendered to the Pro Tools revolution, they had no option but to sell off their vintage analogue equipment. Dave Grohl, whose nostalgic emotional attachment to Rupert Neve’s sound desk overrode any professional concerns about the amount of archaic cocaine clogging up its faders, decided to take the console off their hands. More than just a token gesture, it galvanised him to direct Sound City, a feature-length documentary about the studio’s history that in turn inspired Real to Reel, an allstar tribute album featuring Stevie Nicks, Trent Reznor, Josh Homme, Lee Ving and other assorted alumni.

A few days before Grohl’s cinematic debut premiered in Hollywood Boulevard, Rick Rubin, one of the film’s most enlightening interviewees, made a rare pilgrimage back up the 405 Freeway to reminisce with the former Nirvana drummer about LA’s unintentional musical mecca. Turning the lights down low in the control room of Grohl’s Studio 606, the two friends sat once more in front of the coveted Neve 8028 and invited Dazed to pull up a pew…

Dazed & Confused: Mick Fleetwood describes Sound City as ‘a church’. How would you both describe it?
Rick Rubin: I spent a lot of time there. I wouldn’t describe it as a church. We had spiritual things happen, but it was really not a nice place to be. It was filthy. It felt like it didn’t have to be that bad. It almost seemed like you had to really be an edgy person to let it be like that. It was like, how do we make it more funky?

Dave Grohl: When Mick Fleetwood first went there it was state of the art… in 1973. They had just built it, and had this new brown carpet and a new couch, so he was like, ‘It was great.’ That’s why they decided to make a record there. The further you go down the line, the more people’s first impressions turned into exactly what we experienced. The owners made a million dollars from producing the Rick Springfield record, but when you watch the film you’re like, ‘Where the fuck did all that money go? What the fuck did you do with that? You didn’t even paint the fucking walls!’ When Nirvana first got there, they were really close to closing down. They had a manager that was dealing drugs and nobody knew what the fuck was going on. It was cheap though.

D&C: Were the owners scared to change anything in case it ruined the sound?
DG: No one was going to re-floor the room, because everyone was afraid that they would lose what was awesome about Sound City. It might also be total neglect.

RR: It looked like neglect. In places where the sound didn’t matter, say the bathrooms, there were 20 sockets for light bulbs. And I don’t remember at any point more than, like, three light bulbs in those 20 sockets. That had nothing to do with the sound in the studio. (laughs)

DG: I always felt like it was a specific type of person that went to Sound City. And because of that, there was something specific that it represented. You wouldn’t go there and find fucking Lady Gaga making a record. You would find a band like Rage Against the Machine. We found a video of them making (their self-titled debut) in there with a bunch of their friends watching them. In the film we go from the audio of the album and fade into the audio from the one mic on the video camera and it’s the same fucking take. That rawness was exactly what Sound City was about.

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D&C: Do you think that its griminess also helped to ground the egos of the world’s biggest rock stars?
RR: I think everyone was willing to put up with being at Sound City because of how good it sounded. It’s a hard thing to find, really; where you can set up in a room and have it sound like how you sound. Someone said that it was because it was so poorly built. The studio didn’t add anything to the sound. It was like a barn. It wasn’t built to studio standards. It’s just sort of a big, empty space that was flimsy enough that it didn’t really contain the sound. So it allowed the music to breathe. It wasn’t on purpose.

DG: A block away there’s a Best Western hotel next to a Taco Bell. When Metallica made an album there, James Hetfield stayed at the Best Western. James fucking Hetfield stayed at that fucking shithole hotel so that he could be two blocks away from the best-sounding room in the fucking world, you know. People go to great lengths. My studio, where we are now, might be the only one that’s farther out.

RR: Unless you were going to Sound City you would never go to this place, this area. It’s in the middle of nowhere.

DG: I live nearby, but that’s the only reason I have my studio here. Otherwise you wouldn’t come to the Valley. But there’s something to be said for working in studios that aren’t in the middle of everything. I’ve never made an album in New York City. I can’t even imagine turning off the world and walking into a room knowing that on the other side of that wall is Fifth Avenue. I like to be somewhere where I’m a little bit isolated. I don’t need to go to fucking Hawaii to make a record. That wasn’t one of the things I did like about Sound City: I felt like once I was there I had to work because I couldn’t go take a break. It almost amplified that work ethic because, what are you gonna do? Hang out there all day long? Not really.

I HAVE A LOT OF PATIENCE. WHAT WE’RE LOOKING FOR ISN’T IN ANYONE’S CONTROL. NONE OF US CAN MAKE THIS GREAT THING HAPPEN. WAITING IS KIND OF THE JOB

RR: Absolutely. It was a place to come, do your work and get out as quickly as possible. Another part of it that drew us in was the equipment. As technology continued, in theory, to improve, things kept changing and the changes weren’t always for the better. And it didn’t always suit rock’n’roll, which was more often than not what we were recording. So it was hard to find studios that were more traditional. It wasn’t really production; it was about documenting a moment. Sound City was a really great place to document a moment.

DG: The first song we recorded there was ‘In Bloom’. We set up, tuned up and got big sounds. I’d never heard my drums sound like that before. It was the first time we’d heard Nirvana sound like that. It didn’t sound like Bleach, you know. It didn’t sound like the Peel sessions we’d done. It didn’t sound like any of the demos. It sounded like Nevermind. And when I heard the toms, the kick and the snare on ‘In Bloom’ – it was an instrumental take, I don’t even know if Kurt did a guide vocal – our jaws dropped, because it sounded real, it sounded aggressive, it sounded really powerful. After what first day we knew it was gonna be alright. We blew through everything in 16 days. That made the greatest impression on me.

RR: Sound City had such a limited amount of gear that there wasn’t much opportunity to change the way anything sounded. It was pretty much limited to microphones and this Neve console, which, luckily, doesn’t change stuff much. You don’t really have an option but to sound like what you sound like.

DG: There’s a really great quote from (Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers guitarist) Benmont Tench in the movie where he says, ‘It’s cruel, because you’d go to the control room and listen to yourself and just think “I suck”, which pushed you to be better’ That was a good thing.

D&C: When you have one of those days when you suck, how do you get over it?
DG: 
I can’t even imagine your job, Rick! When I go in to record something, I’ll do it until I get it. I have a hard time walking away from things, so if I’m trying to get it, I might want to throw something through a fucking window but I work hard until I get it. I’ll sit there and look at whoever is producing us and I feel so sorry for them ’cause I know they just want to take my hands and make them do what they need to do.

WHEN I GO IN TO RECORD SOMETHING, I’LL DO IT UNTIL I GET IT. I MIGHT WANT TO THROW SOMETHING THROUGH A FUCKING WINDOW BUT I WORK HARD UNTIL I GET IT

RR: I just have a lot of patience. You have to, becausewhat we’re looking for isn’t in anyone’s control. It’s like everyone’s there with the same intention to make this great thing happen but none of us can make that great thing happen. The closest comparison I can make to it would be fishing. When you go fishing you could fish all day and not catch anything, but you have a much better chance of catching fish if you’re fishing all day than if you’re not fishing all day. Some days we’ll play it three times, and it’s all great. Sometimes we’ll play it 100 times and it never gets great. Waiting is kind of the job.

DG: A lot of musicians get red-light fever; they get scared.

RR: It’s anxiety.

DG: You could sit through a song and do a perfect rehearsal, and then hit record and everything changes.

RR: Stage fright.

DG: When we were kids and we knew someone with a studio that had a reel of tape, you couldn’t wait to get over there to record something. You weren’t afraid to hit record when you were 16. It was like, ‘Fuck, we’re gonna record, this is amazing. I get to record a song.’ I still feel the same way.

RR: Usually when I start a new project there’s a fear of the unknown; maybe it’s a band I’ve never been in the studio with before.People are so different. It’s almost like you need to go through the process, discover and unlock what it is that makes that band that band. And a lot of times they don’t know it. More often than not they don’t know it. But over time you start seeing patterns of things that work and don’t work and why. It does seem like the more prepared you are before you go into the studio, the better the experience. If the band really knows what they’re doing, you save a great deal of time. The idea of going into a studio to write an album seems like a bad idea. You’re never focused on getting a great performance because you’re still trying to figure out what you’re going to do.

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D&C: On the flipside, someone like Jay-Z has it all in his head. It must be amazing to witness, but as a producer you can’t really prepare for that, can you?
RR: It’s about getting the music right, and then that inspires him to do the vocals. He’ll sit back in the corner and he’ll play the track over and over and over again, probably for a half hour, 45 minutes, an hour – almost to the point where you don’t even realise he’s there. It’s just like this monotonous thing going on, and then all of a sudden he jumps up and he’s like, ‘I got it,’ and he runs in the other room and does a complicated verse. It’s really unbelievable. And then he’ll do it, and then he’ll do it again and it’ll be different. The words will be pretty much the same but the phrasing will be different and the accents will be different. Imagine that you’ve written a solo and then you play it, like, different ways; that’s kind of what he does with his vocals. Unbelievable.

D&C: Rick, you have a stuffed bison in your home studio. What’s the weirdest thing you’ve both encountered in other studios?
RR: This guy called Alan (Dickson) from Grandmaster in Hollywood.

DG: (laughs) I remember walking into a studio at Grandmaster and it had a calendar up on the wall. It said ‘Korn’ on it, and they had just been in the studio for a week. I said, ‘Wow, what did Korn record here?’ And they said, ‘Korn didn’t record here.’ So I replied, ‘What’s this you’ve got on the fucking calendar then?’, and they said, ‘No, that’s “Porn”. We film porn here.’ All of a sudden I didn’t want to touch anything. I saw one of the pornos, it was called Cum Bandits, a parody of Time Bandits. They had a bathtub in the studio which turned into a portal to another dimension. That was a little weird.

D&C: Do you think any babies have been made on this beloved Neve desk of yours?
DG: Dude, when we brought this over here, my poor friend Lou had to spend about a week going through this thing with a toothbrush just to get the cocaine and the fried chicken out of it. Fuck, yeah. It’s funny, I didn’t want to modify the board. All I wanted to do was yank it out of there, plug it back in, and make sure that it was good to go. You get worried that the years of filth might have something to do with the way it sounds. Mike from the Heartbreakers emailed me to say, ‘Oh, by the way, if you find any white powder in that board it’s my medicine. Return it immediately.’ (laughs)

RR: I can’t even imagine how many things I spilled on this board. have sex, drugs and Rock’n’Roll disappeared from today’s studio culture?

DG: No.

RR: Not for The Foo Fighters. (laughs) They fly the flag.

D&C: Rick, were you upset that Dave got his hands on SOUND CITY’s Neve board?
RR: Not at all. I’m glad that he got it and a movie got to be made about Sound City because of it, which never would have happened if I had bought it. I already have a couple of similar boards. I was tempted but then felt like it would be a disservice because, as Dave says in the film, he knew that if he got it, it wouldn’t sit bubble wrapped in storage somewhere, and if I did, it probably would. I have an extra Neve sitting up on its side in my garage, so this would be next to that and it would be doing a disservice to what this is.

DG: It’s one of the funny things about a board; you look at this board and it seems so archaic, considering what people use to make albums now. A lot of people consider it obsolete, but it still fucking works. This thing will probably work longer than I’ll be alive. In 30 or 40 years from now you will probably still be able to make an album on this board. And as much as it might seem impractical and it might seem obsolete, it still does what it’s supposed to do.

RR: And it will probably sound better than anything new that comes out and replaces it.

DG: Things that try to emulate or simulate what this board does, you know, they are more practical and they are more accessible and if you can’t fit one of these into your living room it’s probably the closest thing you’re going to get. But still, what this does is what only this really does.

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D&C: Do you think that the fabric of a studio – the building and equipment – hold a sound memory that affects subsequent recordings?
RR:
 For sure. How formal or how casual the space is can really influence everything. We recorded Johnny Cash in my living room. It couldn’t have been more casual. And I feel like that lack of pressure creates a certain feeling, and the same I’m sure is true with concerts. If you do a concert in the middle of nowhere and that’s one gig, and the next night you’re playing at Madison Square Garden…

DG: It’s different.

RR: …because it’s Madison Square Garden. The Royal Albert Hall is different to playing somewhere in the Midlands. Even if it’s just your perception of it, everything changes. DG: I really believe that the experience of making an album influences the end result. On our second Foo Fighters album I was going through a fucking divorce, I was living in my friend’s back room, getting pissed on at night by his fucking dog, in a sleeping bag, and I would go to the studio and write a song that was so fucking heartbreaking that I can’t even listen to some of that music because it brings me back to how miserable I was. So that experience totally influenced that album.

RR: Plus the fact that it was recorded at Grandmaster (laughs)
DG: (laughs) That definitely influenced a lot of shit in itself. Whether it’s the history of a room, or whether it’s the ghosts in the fucking room, whatever you choose to believe, if you want to capture a moment, something real, then you just have to be open to everything.

D&C: Who’s made you BOTH step up your game in the studio?
DG: It’s hard to top Paul McCartney. When Paul comes in to your studio and he’s brought his Hofner bass, ‘The Bass’, and he’s brought his Les Paul, ‘The Les Paul’, and a guitar made out of a cigar box, and he decides to play the guitar made out of the cigar box, you realise, ‘That’s badass. I have to be badass, too. I can’t just play it like I’m playing with my friends down the street. I have to be great right now.’ I’m lucky, I’ve jammed with some crazy fucking wicked musicians.

RR: 
I’ve gotten to work with amazing people. I would say usually we get to a point before we get into the studio where there isn’t that sense of anxiety or nervousness of who they are because I don’t think it would be as productive in the studio if that was the case. But maybe meeting someone like Neil Young for the first time made me anxious. But then when you get to hang out with Neil Young it’s all good. We were supposed to record together and then he cut off a piece of his finger and couldn’t play guitar. But he still had the studio booked, so we went in and played this harmonica through his guitar amp…

Read more here: Dave Grohl Vs Rick Rubin | Dazed Digital.

Photos by John Kilar

Corey Taylor On Performing With Sound City Players: ‘Talk About A Fanboy-gasm!’

Corey Taylor photographed by Michael N. Todaro/Getty Images

This past Friday night (January 18), Corey Taylor made the following announcement from the stage at Park City Live in Utah: “This is the craziest f***in’ night of my life.”

That’s quite a statement from a guy known for dressing up in a boiler suit, donning a mask that looks like horror film character Leatherface and bellowing vocals on songs titled “The Heretic Anthem” and “Pulse Of The Maggots.”

But the Slipknot and Stone Sour frontman was, for sure, in unusual surroundings Friday, performing Cheap Trick covers, accompanied by Cheap Trick’s Rick Nielsen, along with Nirvana alumni Krist Novoselic (bass), Dave Grohl (drums) and Pat Smear (guitar). The show was part of the celebration around the Grohl-directed documentary, Sound City, following its debut at the Sundance Film Festival 

Taylor tells Radio.com that he’s still digesting the experience. Watch the interview here http://bit.ly/XynIyq

“How did that happen? Somebody please explain that to me! That was awesome though. Being able to get up with Rick Nielsen — and basically Nirvana. Talk about a fanboy-gasm! I was just up there going, ‘What am I doing here?’ But we had a great time. It re-introduced my love for Cheap Trick. I really went deep in the catalog. I thought, ‘This band, they don’t get enough credit.’”

 

M_SoundCityMoviePoster

Grohl’s passion for music is unbridled as he talks to musicians and singers like Neil Young, Stevie Nicks, Rick Springfield, Trent Reznor and more, recounting the history of the studio where he and his friends from Nirvana showed up to record Nevermind, one of the most iconic rock albums of all time. His reaction to some of the stories and the time he spends reflecting on the studio’s rise and fall (which happened twice) is like a kid in a candy shop. For this portion of the documentary, Grohl’s varying style of filming the interviews was refreshing from talking heads looking off camera to Grohl sitting in the room with a particular subject or just chilling in a recording studio, Ethan Anderton wrote for the firstshowing.net. These are stories from rock legends about rock history. It doesn’t get much better than that.

Sound City

For the entire duration of Sound City, I had a big goofy smile on my face, and even had a couple tears settle in my eyes hearing some of these great musical icons talk about the start of their careers. This is all made possible by Dave Grohl, a guy who made this documentary as a tribute to all those who keep making music with real people, whether it’s in their garage or in a makeshift studio. It’s about not letting technology do all the work and act as a crutch for shortcoming in talent. Grohl isn’t cocky, but he’s respectful of his craft, and mixes no nonsense about his love for Sound City. The documentary isn’t perfect, but Sound City is a revelation full of musical passion, love, raw energy and a fascinating chronicle of an unlikely historical music studio and the people who made it possible.

Read more review about the movie here: http://bit.ly/UTr8h9

–images from firstshowing.net

_grohl

David Eric “Dave” Grohl (born January 14, 1969) is an American rock musicianmulti-instrumentalist, and singer-songwriter, who is the lead vocalistguitarist, primary songwriter and founder of the Foo Fighters. Prior to this, he was the drummer for the grunge band Nirvana. He is also the drummer and co-founder of the rock supergroup Them Crooked Vultures. Grohl has additionally written all the music and performed all the instruments for his short-lived side projects Late! and Probot, as well as being involved with Queens of the Stone Age numerous times throughout the past decade. He has performed session work (as a drummer) for a variety of musicians, including GarbageKilling JokeNine Inch NailsDavid BowiePaul McCartneyThe ProdigySlashIggy PopJuliette LewisTenacious DTom Petty and the Heartbreakers, and Lemmy, and the latest with Sir Paul McCartney.

Grohl arguably is the most busiest musician today. Not to mention Jack White and Mike Patton. Grohl is directing a documentary about Sound City Studios, the Van Nuys studio where Nevermind was recorded that shut down its music operations in 2011.  He also directs the new Soundgarden music video, By Crooked Steps.

To celebrate his birthday, here we present our Top Ten Foo Fighters Songs.

10. AURORA (There Is Nothing Left To Lose, 1999)
“‘Aurora’ is definitely one of my favourite songs that we’ve ever come up with. Lyrically, it’s just kind of a big question mark, but the words sound good and it’s a nostagic look back at Seattle and the life I once had. That song actually questions the meaning of life, probably. It’s probably the
heaviest thing I’ve ever written.”

9. AIN’T IT THE LIFE (There Is Nothing Left To Lose, 1999)
“That’s what happens when you listen to too much mellow 70’s gold Fleetwood Mac type stuff while recording. Ain’t it the’ life sounds like an Eagles song or something, and I hate The Eagles. It’s about living the quiet, peaceful Virginia life.”

8. TIMES LIKE THESE (One By One, 2002)
“This is sort of a mid-tempo number with a really weird chording that’s kinda reminiscent of Mission Of Burma or Television or kind of a jangly post-punk New York new wave theme guitar line. I think actually that this is the best song I’ve ever written – it’s very emotive and passionate and universal.”

7. NO WAY BACK (In Your Honour, 2005)
“I love that song and the record company wanted it be the first single, but to me it sounded too much like a Foo Fighters song. That song’s kind of our signature sound and I was afraid that if we were to release that
right off the bat then it was too safe and predictable.”
“‘No Way Back’ is another song that I wrote right off the John Kerry campaign trail. It has a lot to do with feeling controlled by a government that you didn’t elect. We got a lot of questions when we first released the
record because everybody thought the title was dedicated to John Kerry, and it was influenced by that, but it wasn’t dedicated to John Kerry. But I kind of denied a lot of the political overtones because I didn’t want to
step on Green Day’s toes or have people think we were a political band and I didn’t want us to turn into Rage Against The Machine. By leaving my perspective out of things it made it so general that other people decide their interpretation.”

6. STRANGER THINGS HAVE HAPPENED (Echoes, Silence, Patience & Grace, 2007)
“I spend a lot of time in silence. I spend a lot of time alone in hotel rooms; I really don’t do a hell of a lot on the road. I’ve been touring for a long time and hotel rooms all begin to look the same after a while. This is
a product of just sitting around and doing fuck all for weeks on end.”

5. HOME (Echoes, Silence, Patience & Grace, 2007)
“I wrote this at home on the piano, then Taylor and I recorded a demo of it. I sat and wrote the lyrics in about 10 minutes, sang it once, listened to it, and just felt overwhelmed by how revealing it was. It made me feel quite vulnerable, so much so that it’s hard to listen to. I get really choked up thinking about all the time I spend away from the things that are important to me. It’s tough being away on tour; it’s even tough
just to be talking about how much I wish I was with my family. It’s the kind of song I can’t imagine singing live because it’s going to be too much.”
4. HEY, JOHNNY PARK (The Colour And The Shape, 1997)
“Oh, my God, that song’s about 15 different things! The only reason why it’s called ‘Hey, Johnny Park!’ is because when I was young, my best friend was this kid who lived across
the street from me called Johnny Park and we were like brothers from the age of 5 to 12. I haven’t heard from him since I was about 14 years old and I thought if I named a song after him he might call.”

3. I SHOULD HAVE KNOWN (Wasting Light, 2011)
“When I first wrote that, I was sitting in my bedroom, and I had someone else in mind when I was singing it. But then as I elaborated on it I thought,there are definitely connections. I’ve definitely felt that way before, especially with Kurt, where, you know, I was afraid this was going to happen. So to have Krist come down and play on that song was kind of a risky move. I explained to him, I said:
“Yeah, you know, it’s one of those songs that I’m sure people are going to think it’s about Kurt.” And he basically said: “Oh, fuck it. That’s okay.”

2. EVERLONG (The Colour And The Shape, 1997)
“The first time I’ve ever played that new wave drum beat and it was fun!”

1. FEBRUARY STARS (The Colour And The Shape, 1997)
“Just a song about hanging on by the tips of your fingers and hoping you don’t slip and fall.”

–words taken from many sources by @agunsux. top ten songs compiled by @unclebowl, words from many sources. image taken from weheartit.com

Weezer – Blue Album (1994). A Peak At Their Debut.

If you grew up in 90’s and you’re into rock music. Try to make this list: 30 CD’s/cassettes to buy/listen/borrow/steal in the 90’s.  There must be Nevermind (Nirvana), Ten (Pearl Jam), Superunknown (Soundgarden), Rage Against The Machine (debut album), Black Album (Metallica), Melon Colie And The Infinite Sadness (The Smashing Pumpkins), Soundsystem (311), Use Your Illusion (Guns And Roses), The Downward Spiral (NIN), maybe Dummy (Portishead) and.. Blue Album from Weezer! Rite?

No? Well you have problems with your ears :p _weezer_-_blue_albumWhat has happened in 1994.

  • Nirvana played their final concert in Munich. Few weeks later he shot himself.
  • Frank Sinatra received the Grammy Awards Lifetime Achievement award.
  • Pink Floyd embarked on what would be their last world tour before their breakup. The record-breaking tour supported their Division Bell album, with the band playing to 5,500,000 people in 68 cities and grossing over £150,000,000.
  • Blur and Oasis started to invade USA
  • Green Day released Dookie album. Their masterpiece till now.
  • Adam Horovitz of the Beastie Boys is sentenced to 200 hours of community service for attacking a television cameraman during funeral services for actor River Phoenix in November 1993.
  • Pearl Jam filed a complaint against Ticketmaster with the U.S. Justice Department charging that the company has a monopoly on the concert ticket business.

You know that Buddy Holly music video directed by Spike Jonze (well known for film Being John Malkovich, Adaptation and also plenty of music videos). Remember Beastie Boys‘ Sabotage or Bjork’s It’s Oh So Quiet? I’ll stop here before i start blabbering  about him. That Buddy Holly video is one of the most anticipated video of the 90’s. Along with November Rain by Guns And Roses or maybe Smells Like Teen Spirit by Nirvana. Earned heavy rotation by MTV back then.

Weezer’s alt-rock godliness was of the likes no one had ever seen before. They were different. In the 80’s, it was all about partying, Girls Girls Girls, and hair. At the turn of the decade, it was all about anger, With The Lights Out, and grunge. Then it became laziness, Longview, and punk. So when Weezer came around, naturally the people who weren’t punks, partyers, or flannel wearing lumberjacks found their voice. Rivers Cuomo‘s simple yet effective songs became staples for every geeks collection. Bands since then have tried ripping off their geekiness (One geek band going so far as to be called Wheatus), but Weezer perfected the art of nerd long before the pretenders. When uncovering the lyrics behind the songs, you find happy little childhood dreams mixed with songs about girls and beer. Lines like “Wee-oo I look Just Like Buddy Holly. Oh-oh and you’re Mary Tyler Moore” became anthems for the whole generation. Rivers had the gift for turning a monologue of Hemingway quality into a rocking track. The 6/8 opener My Name Is Jonas is a track centered around some folkish finger picking. The literate rants are cut off midway through for a headbanging bridge thats just so random and funny. (sputnikmusic)

There have been very few albums that can change the face of music both culturally and musically. Weezer made it cool to be an honors student. Weezer made it cool to be a geek. But with Blue, Weezer made it cool to be all those things, and be rock stars. My only complaint is the upsettingly short ten songs. Weezer’s never been good at packing in the extras, but another few songs wouldn’t have killed the genius of the other 7 or 8 great songs on here. But in terms of musicianship, charm, songwriting, and cultural signifigance, Weezer’s debut album is the pinnacle of their career. Kinda sucks when you peak at your debut, eh? (sputnikmusic)

NEW SOUNDGARDEN VIDEO DIRECTED BY DAVE GROHL

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Dave Grohl has been a busy guy. Not only has he been putting the finishing touches to his documentary on Sound City Studios, but he has also been promoting his film’s soundtrack (with a little help from an ex-Beatle). Now the Foo Fighters frontman (and Nirvana drummer) can add a Soundgarden music video to his resume.

Soundgarden revealed yesterday that they were filming a new music video for the song “By Crooked Steps” with Grohl directing. The reunited grunge group posted candid on-set photos from the shooting via Instagram, including the one seen above. Though the video’s plot hasn’t been made publicly known, the photos indicate there’s some sort of biker-gang theme occurring in the video.

It’s unknown as to how soon we’ll get to see the video for “By Crooked Steps.” Either way, though, it’s just cool to know that Grohl and Soundgarden are collaborating in some fashion.

(by zach shaw for metalinsider.net)

Video: Paul McCartney and “Nirvana” onSaturday Night Live

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To quote Foo Fighters, “Second time’s a charm…” For the second time this week, the surviving members of Nirvana joined forces with Sir Paul McCartney to perform their song “Cut Me Some Slack” on national television. This time around, the all-star collaboration took place on last night’s episode of Saturday Night Live, where McCartney was making his fourth stint as musical guest. (It marked Dave Grohl’s 12th appearance on the show!) McCartney also teamed with the Eagles’ Joe Walsh for a rendition of “My Valentine”. Watch footage of both performances below (via The Audio Perv). In related news, Grohl has shared the studio version of “Cut Me Some Slack”, which you can also find below. The song is also available for download on iTunes, and appears on the soundtrack to Grohl’s film Sound City.

(taken from: cos)

COURTNEY LOVE SLAMS SURVIVING NIRVANA MEMBERS’ ’12-12-12′ PERFORMANCE WITH PAUL MCCARTNEY

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Last night at the ’12-12-12′ Hurricane Sandy benefit concert, Paul McCartney performed an original song with the three surviving members of Nirvana. The musical collective wrote the song ‘Cut Me Some Slack’ during an impromptu jam session for Dave Grohl‘s upcoming ‘Sound City Studios’ documentary, later debuting the track live at the televised benefit. Although the song proved to be impressive to say the least, Courtney Lovewent public beforehand to say that she was against the idea. After learning that McCartney and Nirvana would be collaborating for the benefit, Love told TMZ that she was “not amused” by Paul McCartney’s involvement, although she added, “Look, if John [Lennon] were alive it would be cool.” Shortly after the performance of ‘Cut Me Some Slack,’ Courtney Love posted a long, scattered and nonsensical series of comments on the Facebook page for ‘Everybody Loves Our Town: An Oral History of Grunge,’ which had just posted about the aforementioned TMZ article. Below is a compilation of her comments:

“funny we got asked to tour with alice in chains no disprespect to jerry as hes a n absolute gent but wasnt that,,, i mean isnt layne DEAD? sorry i had to pass maybe im old or pure or somes–t but wow. anyone ever read the former strangers dana giachetta book”youw ill make money in yourr sleep” its so beyond full of small numbers and she misses the grander point it sold about 8 copies, 4 to me and 4 to a famed hotelier out here i dated and am dear friends with. hmmm whats in that 2030 kimit sub pop nirvana package jonathan i was with you the night before you went to see mr geffen to acquire that 5% of kurts pub but its apparently inc llc and partnership too , cmon show me, fine get a supeona. glad i coudl help refinance the soho hotel in nov 94 not july emily ever been on property shark? its called research! i was playing cheap tricks first album in chrinocologal order to get my sib oop single of the month anyone says othrwise is disguting, is that richard lee still at it, i talked to chris cornell and he hates seattle too, i cant deal, the only time i felt anything was when i had a spitirtuL ephihany singing “jeremy” at bumbershoot i hope you liked it cos i saw ghosts for the first time, accuracy is my middle name. watch homeland when clare danes is right, trust me i have cried on the occasions the lawyers have promised theyd go for it and the fbi this time is different its federal. but i wont cry this time, i only care about his familty and bean and thats the f–king fgids truth any penny i get back is going inti a charity that prevents mortaage fraud and this happpening to anyone again, taking down the a=gates llp empire would be nice but im not stupid it wont happen n this life, not from me im not the messenger there some day though. yall got good copy now ill leave it up a few then ill delete.”

Although Courtney Love’s last line promises that she would delete the posts, they still remain in the comments section as of this posting.

A few hours later, Love posted some more odd comments, focused on her and Kurt Cobain arguing John Lennon vs. Paul McCartney, and ultimately saying the performance didn’t bother her since they ended up not playing a Nirvana song:

“yes we did get into paul and john fights- im a paul person (helter skelter) if they dont do songs they didnt write (nirvana songs they dont own) i dont care.”

However, Love trashed the bass playing of Krist Novoselic when she responded to a Facebook user named Scott, who posted that he enjoyed the performance:

“scott really? i will repeat, with krists bass playing? lets be clear hes not exactly known for its brilliance.”

Well, there you go. If you were wondering what Courtney Love thought of the performance, now you sort of have an idea. If you don’t care about what she thinks, we owe you five minutes of your life back.

article written by Graham ‘Gruhamed’ Hartmann from loudwire.com

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