Tag Archive: Margaret Thatcher


Singer Morrissey, of the seminal 1980s band The Smiths, reacts to news of the death of former U.K. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher

Morrissey and Margaret Thatcher
Morrissey and Margaret Thatcher. (Getty; AP)
Thatcher is remembered as The Iron Lady only because she possessed completely negative traits such as persistent stubbornness and a determined refusal to listen to others.Every move she made was charged by negativity; she destroyed the British manufacturing industry, she hated the miners, she hated the arts, she hated the Irish Freedom Fighters and allowed them to die, she hated the English poor and did nothing at all to help them, she hated Greenpeace and environmental protectionists, she was the only European political leader who opposed a ban on the ivory trade, she had no wit and no warmth and even her own cabinet booted her out. She gave the order to blow up The Belgrano even though it was outside of the Malvinas Exclusion Zone—and was sailing AWAY from the islands! When the young Argentinean boys aboard The Belgrano had suffered a most appalling and unjust death, Thatcher gave the thumbs-up sign for the British press.
Iron? No. Barbaric? Yes. She hated feminists even though it was largely due to the progression of the women’s movement that the British people allowed themselves to accept that a prime minister could actually be female. But because of Thatcher, there will never again be another woman in power in British politics, and rather than opening that particular door for other women, she closed it.
Thatcher will only be fondly remembered by sentimentalists who did not suffer under her leadership, but the majority of British working people have forgotten her already, and the people of Argentina will be celebrating her death. As a matter of recorded fact, Thatcher was a terror without an atom of humanity.
MORRISSEY.
source: thedailybeast.com

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Image by Chris Jackson / Getty Images
Margaret Thatcher served as the prime minister of the United Kingdom from 1979 to 1990. Nicknamed the Iron Lady, Thatcher was known for her steadfast conservative politics. Thatcher’s term coincided with a boom in English music in the wake of the punk movement, and much of this music harshly criticized her policies or straight up attacked her on a personal level. Bands tapped into the atmosphere of anger and discontent in Thatcher’s England, singing about everything from high unemployment rates to the Falklands War. Here’s the list made by Angela Meiquan Wang for buzzfeed.com:  

1. The Not Sensibles, “I’m in Love with Margaret Thatcher” (1979)

Though most songs about Thatcher make her out to be a villain, this song, released shortly after she was elected to office, is rather lighthearted and tongue-in-cheek.

2. The English Beat, “Stand Down Margaret” (1980)

Two-tone ska legends The Beat were among the first to condemn Thatcher in song with this cut from their album I Just Can’t Stop It.

3. The Blues Band, “Maggie’s Farm” (1980)

This tune rewrites Bob Dylan’s “Maggie’s Farm” — itself a rewrite of the folk standard “Penny’s Farm” — as a commentary on Thatcher’s government.

4. The Specials, “Ghost Town” (1981)

Another ska classic about Thatcher. “This town’s becoming like a ghost town / Government leaving the youth on the shelf.”

5. Poison Girls, “Another Hero” (1981)

Maggie Thatcher‘s patching up her makeup in the broken glass.” From the albumTotal Exposure.

6. Klaus Nomi, “Ding Dong! The Witch Is Dead” (1982)

NYC-based New Wave eccentric Nomi turned a song from The Wizard of Oz into a commentary on Thatcher’s politics.

7. Newtown Neurotics, “Kick Out The Tories” (1982)

This underrated punk band’s third single focused on working-class struggles in Thatcher’s Britain.

8. Pink Floyd, “The Fletcher Memorial Home” (1983)

Roger Waters envisions “The Fletcher Memorial Home for Incurable Tyrants and Kings” in this song from The Final Cut, naming Margaret Thatcher as one of the tyrants in residence.

9. The Varukers, “Thatcher’s Fortress” (1984)

Fast and loud, The Varukers rage against Thatcher in this cut from their Massacred Millions EP.

10. The Larks, “Maggie Maggie Maggie (Out Out Out)” (1985)

“MAGGIEMAGGIEMAGGIE, OUT OUT OUT!”
This charged punk anthem is based on the English Miner’s Strike protest chant, “Maggie Out,” and is featured on the Miners’ Benefit LP Here We Go.

11. Crass, “How Does It Feel?” (1986)

These anarcho-punk legends are famous for their scathing critiques of Thatcher’s regime, and this song from Best Before 1984 is a prime example. “How does it feel to be the mother of a thousand dead?”

12. Thatcher on Acid, “Guess Who’s Running the Show” (1987)

Formed in 1983, this anarcho-punk group chose to reference Thatcher explicitly in their band’s name.

13. Morrissey, “Margaret on the Guillotine” (1988)

This song from Morrissey’s debut solo album Viva Hate, which calls for Thatcher’s death, made him the subject of an official investigation by British police.

14. Elvis Costello, “Tramp the Dirt Down” (1989)

Costello fantasizes about stomping on Thatcher’s grave in this harshly condemning cut from Spike, singing “And when they finally lay you in the ground / I’ll stand on your grave and tramp the dirt down.”

15. Kitchens of Distinction, “Margaret’s Injection” (1989)

“Never relished violence, but Margaret, it’s time for your injection.” From the albumLove is Hell.

16. Sinead O’Connor, “Black Boys on Mopeds” (1990)

This sobering song from I Do Not Want What I Haven’t Got digs at Thatcher in its opening verse, before going on to assert that “England’s not the mythical land of Madame George and roses.”

17. VIM, “Maggie’s Last Party” (1991)

Thatcher’s own words are used for a darkly comic effect on this ironic rave track.

18. Billy Bragg, “Thatcherites” (1996)

Billy Bragg comments on Thatcher’s legacy in this song released after she left office, which jabs at succeeding Prime Minister John Major. “Your leader she has gone, but she’s left us little John.”

19. Hefner, “The Day that Thatcher Dies” (2000)

“We will laugh the day that Thatcher dies, even though it’s not right,” Darren Hayman sings in this song, which went on to become one of his band’s most famous tunes. This song also calls back to “Ding-Dong! The Witch Is Dead.”

20. Frank Turner, “Thatcher Fucked the Kids” (2006)

Turner reckons with the lasting influence of Thatcher in this cut from Campfire Punkrock singing, “Blame the folks who sold the future for the highest bid / That’s right, Thatcher fucked the kids.”

21. Pete Wylie, “The Day that Margaret Thatcher Dies” (2011)

Not to be confused with the Hefner song of the same name, this party-rock tune revels in its hatred for the former prime minister: “She’s gone! And nobody cried!”

 


“A lot of people are homesick for The Smiths — and not because everyone else is abysmal, but because the songs of The Smiths are so good.” Hollywood Reporter, 2013

“I would rather eat my own testicles than reform The Smiths, and that’s saying something for a vegetarian.” Uncut, 2006

“I have so much pride and love for the songs of The Smiths. However, I must ask you, if you come across any Smiths CDs, don’t buy them because all the money goes to that wretched drummer.” Onstage in Edinburgh, 2008

“We’d come off remarkably successful tours and have to sit down and sign 80 cheques. Johnny and I would just look at each other and all of a sudden get very… old…it got entirely out of control, totally, totally out of control. This, if anything, was the cause of The Smiths’ death. Especially the monetary side. We were making huge amounts of money and it was going everywhere but in the personal bank accounts of the four group members.” Melody Maker, 1988

“Many people judge the Smiths as being absolutely dour in their approach. But I like to feel that whatever assessments people make of the Smiths, the Smiths speak absolutely for now, singing about the way people live as opposed to the way people don’t live, which seems to be the cast-iron mode of songwriting these days. We live in a world which is unlike the way Top Forty records convey it.” Rolling Stone, 2012

The New York Dolls and Patti Smith have proved that there is some life pumping away in the swamps and gutters of New York and they are the only acts which originated from the N.Y. club scene worthy of any praise. The Ramones have absolutely nothing to add that is of relevance or importance and should be rightly filed and forgotten.” Letter to Melody Maker, 1976.

“I wish you wouldn’t mention Miss Numan. Or, should I say ‘Miss Thing’. I dislike him more than I can tell you. People with receding hairlines never know much about anything. And such ugly shoe-taste too. You ought to be ashamed!” Letter to a pen pal, 1980

“Do you really like Kate Bush? I’m not surprised. The nicest thing I could say about her is that she’s unbearable. That voice! Such trash! You’ll learn, Sonny.” Letter to a pen pal, 1980

“The fire in the belly is essential, otherwise you become Michael Bublé — famous and meaningless.” Billboard, 2011

If I put you in a room with Robert Smith, Mark E. Smith and a loaded Smith and Wesson, who would bite the bullet first?
“I’d line them up so that one bullet penetrated both simultaneously (chuckle). Mark E. Smith despises me and has said hateful things about me, all untrue. Robert Smith is a whingebag. It’s rather curious that he began wearing beads at the emergence of The Smiths and (eyes narrowing) has been photographed with flowers. I expect he’s quite supportive of what we do, but I’ve never liked The Cure… not even ‘The Caterpillar.’” The Face, 1984

“Yes I have had a tan, actually. I went to Los Angeles and got one there, but it didn’t make it back to Britain. You’re not allowed to come through customs with a tan.” I-D, 1987

“There is not one person in the whole of England who can remember or repeat a single word ever spoken by the Queen, such is her command of communication.”True-to-You.net, 2010

“And, yet! I am unable to watch the Olympics due to the blustering jingoism that drenches the event. Has England ever been quite so foul with patriotism?” True-to-You.net, 2012
“The entire history of Margaret Thatcher is one of violence and oppression and horror. I think that we must not lie back and cry about it. She’s only one person, and she can be destroyed. I just pray that there is a Sirhan Sirhan somewhere. It’s the only remedy for the country at the moment.” Rolling Stone, 1987

“Yes, I felt too old for Britpop. But maybe I just didn’t like it. The Little Englandness stuff of, ‘You’re too old to be here,’ even though people in their 30′s are getting younger is all part of British snobbery, isn’t it? ‘Where are you going?’ ‘You’re not allowed to be there.’ ‘What right do you have?’ They’ll say it about age, and they’ll say it about using the flag.” Melody Maker, 1997

“Rave is the refuge for the mentally deficient. It’s made by dull people for dull people.” Details, 1992

“Ultimately, I don’t have very cast iron opinions on black music other than black modern music which I detest. I detest Stevie Wonder. I think Diana Ross is awful. I hate all those records in the Top 40 – Janet Jackson, Whitney Houston. I think they’re vile in the extreme. In essence this music doesn’t say anything whatsoever.” Melody Maker, 1986

“In recent years I saw McDonna live, and no audience member reached up toward her to try to touch her. I see this so often with artists whom we’re told are global stars. It is a big lie. Or else, you might possibly be a big star, but you are not loved. My audience has an urgent need to touch, to shake hands, to move out of their seats, to defy so-called security, to make physical contact. They don’t simply sit and observe, but feel the urge to act. It’s a great compliment for me, and one that most Grammy winners could probably never imagine.” Rookie, 2013

“I am inspecting music solidly and the development of a Smiths replacement just isn’t happening. I expected it last year but it didn’t happen, that evolution, the natural course of events,” NME, 1989

“Music that is in the charts today is quite dreadful. I find it a great honour that I have never been considered for awards, such as NME etc. It is a personal victory. All awards shows should be banned!” BBC Radio 2, 2009.

“We will not include any Canadian dates on our world tour to promote our new album. This is in protest against the barbaric slaughter of over 325,000 baby seals which is now underway.” True-to-You.net, 2009

“We all live in a murderous world, as the events in Norway have shown, with 97 [sic] dead. Though that is nothing compared to what happens in McDonald’s and Kentucky Fried shit every day.” Onstage in Warsaw, 2011

“I was amused to hear that Sir Paul McCartload was very angry that Staples had said yes to me but no to him, when really, he should be happy for any victory on behalf of the animals. I know he works tirelessly for the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals [PETA], but he also loves the British royals, whose treatment of animals is abysmal. The Queen herself wears enough fur to blanket most of Russia. He also once sang “Give Ireland back to the Irish,” which was directed at the Queen. Well, she refused, and she still refuses, yet Sir Paul gives her the thumbs up! If he cared passionately about animals, he’d return his knighthood. He doesn’t need the Queen’s approval. He’s given more pleasure to people worldwide than she could ever dream of.” Hollywood Reporter, 2013

(Eating meat) is really on the same moral level as child abuse. It’s the same thing. Animals are like children, they look to us for protection. We should protect them. I really feel quite smug about mad cow disease and foot and mouth and so forth, and I just think ‘Well, what do you expect? People have been saying it for years.’” The Importance of Being Morrissey, 2003

“I don’t perform. Seals perform.” Uncut, 2007

“I can’t be interviewed and talk in light, wispy terms. In throwaway interviews where people ask me basic things, I feel an absolute sense of worthlessness.” The Face, 1984

“I really can’t survive being misquoted. And that happens so much, I sit down almost daily and wonder why it happens. But the positive stuff, one always wants to believe, and the insults one always wants not to believe. When one reads of this monster of arrogance, one doesn’t want to feel that one is that person.” Melody Maker, 1984

“In Rolling Stone, obviously, which got me into lots of trouble, there was a statement that ‘Morrissey is a man who says that he is gay.’ Which was news to me. And it had an absolutely adverse effect on our chances in America.” Creem, 1985

Read more about his quotes here: http://bit.ly/13BtJ5I

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