Tag Archive: London


(Chris McGrath/Getty Images) and (Danny Martindale/Getty Images)

(Chris McGrath/Getty Images) and (Danny Martindale/Getty Images)

On Saturday, March 23, 2013 at London’s Royal Albert Hall, the Britpop wars were finally put to rest when Noel Gallagher, Damon Albarn and Graham Coxon (with modfather Paul Weller on drums) performed Blur’s “Tender” together at the fourth night of the Teenage Cancer Trust benefit concerts, as curated by Gallagher. The event has generated a much-shared photo that is making the Facebook rounds on the pages of people of a certain age, who are reacting with what could only be called glee that is tempered with at least a dash of disbelief. For those not initiated into or too young to remember the halcyon days of Britpop, here’s why it matters just like reported by Courtney E. Smith for radio.com wrote:

To put it in context, Oasis singer/songwriter Noel Gallagher asking Albarn and Coxon to join him on stage for a song is the musical-world’s equivalent of signing a Middle East peace accord. Theirs was the last great feud in the history of British music — unless One Direction and The Wanted agree to really have a go at it, like proper rock stars, for their next promotional cycle. Things went to such extremes in the darkest days of their ‘90s press-driven rivalry that Noel Gallagher told a reporter he hoped Damon Albarn and Blur guitarist Alex James would “catch AIDS and die.” Retracting that comment in 2006 didn’t quite settle the Blur vs. Oasis feud for the media but this single song, or more accurately a single happy face photo during a charity gig, seems to have finally done the trick, a mere 20 years later.

While America in the ‘90s was in the throes of grunge adoration, with the media pitting Nirvana against Pearl Jam in a grudge match that didn’t actually exist (Nirvana vs. Guns N Roses was the real hatefest), across the pond they were celebrating Oasis vs. Blur. The outspoken Gallagaher brothers formed Oasis, which was more of the working man’s band who were devotees to the sound of the Beatles and the hedonistic swagger of the Rolling Stones. They were music industry outsiders, hailing from Manchester in the North of England. In a country where class and caste still matter, the Gallagher brothers are from a family of plumbers with a mother who worked as a lunchlady in the school cafeteria. Noel started in music as a roadie for Inspiral Carpets. Not long after Oasis formed they signed to the indie label Creation, backed by Alan McGee. He was the A&R man behind beloved bands like the Jesus and Mary ChainPrimal Scream and My Bloody Valentine. But the Gallaghers had, and constantly stated, bigger ambitions that were immediately realized when their first album,Definitely Maybe, entered the UK charts at No. 1.

Speaking to MTV in an undated (but clearly shot in the ‘90s) red carpet interview, Gallagher said, “Are you asking me if I’m happy? Listen, I’ve got 87 million pounds in the bank. I’ve got a Rolls Royce. I’ve got three stalkers. I’m about to go on the board at Manchester City [Football Club]. I’m part of the greatest band in the world. Am I happy with that?” Gallagher pauses to creep closer to the lens and begins screaming, “No I’m not! I want more!”

It’s the kind of bloviating the Gallagher brothers were known for the the ‘90s. An interview with Oasis would always generate an off-the-cuff comment about something – be it another band, ill-advised weigh-ins on politics, the Gallagher brother’s mutual hatred, or the Gallagher brothers mutual agreement that they are geniuses and Oasis are the greatest band ever. Their quotes make up dozens of web slide shows. They’re so numerous and free-floating that Wikipedia has a page made up entirely of unattributed things Noel Gallagher is reported to have said, including the underrated gem: “We are the biggest band in Britain of all time, ever. The funny thing is, that f****** mouthing off three years ago about how we were gonna be the biggest band in the world, we actually went and done it.”

But before Oasis, there was Blur. Read more here: Don’t Look Back In Anger: Why The Oasis/Blur Feud Mattered « Radio.com News.

Blur were the polar opposite to Oasis: they were art school students from the University of London who  had been childhood friends, they were all from middle class families and concocted a clever sort of music and lyricism that was more in line with the pretty boy faces of the Kinks but appropriated mod imagery from the Who and they were very, very proud of being clever. They’re the band who refused to recut their second record with Nirvana and Sonic Youth producer Butch Vig to make it appeal more to American audiences in 1993. Their breakthrough 1994 album, Parklife, is widely credited with opening the door to alternative rock radio and press in America for a generation of British indie bands. Albarn himself was never one to shy away from giving a wry media quote, which came in handy when the press-fueled rivalry between Oasis and Blur kicked off.

There was plenty of room on the UK charts for both Blur and Oasis, along with a boatload of other guitar bands, in the ‘90s as the public’s appetite was whetted by their sounds. But the mercurial, mercenary British press couldn’t help setting the two top-selling groups in opposition to each other. But unlike the days of Beatles vs. Stones, these weren’t two groups who socialized together and could make a joke of the black & white roles the press cast them in. If they were on good terms from the start, the so-called “Battle of Britpop” might never have happened.

While most of the NME buying public had already proclaimed themselves to be a fan of either Oasis or Blur, Blur’s camp decided  (in a move that the 2010 documentary No Distance Left To Run would make clear was entirely Albarn’s idea) to take advantage of the media circus, moving the band’s release date for “Country House” to August 14, 1995 – the same day as Oasis’s “Roll With It” was scheduled for stores. With music magazines urging young fans to go out and support the band of their choice in this head-to-head sales competition, the marketing ploy became overhyped and far eclipsed the newsworthiness of the singles themselves – both b to c level moments in the catalogs of the bands. In the end, Blur outsold Oasis by about 50K singles, amid strong objections from the Oasis camp disputing the sportsmanship, unfair advantage of a lower price point and actual barcode fraud in relation to the final tally. Oasis had their feelings further injured when Blur started touring at the same time they did and using a light projection of the number 1 to mark their status.


The sniping continued, with Gallagher making and then apologizing for his infamous AIDS comment. In the 2003 Live Forever Britpop documentary, Albarn summarized the wars in a surly quote, saying, “How did I feel [about it]? I felt stupid and I felt, I just felt very confused. Basically I didn’t really realize that my kind of flippancy was going to have such profound resonance in my life. I changed quite dramatically after that period.”

But that flippancy and the hard-hearted pot shots both bands took at each other in the press were exactly what supremely confident, successful and rich rock stars should do. It is the stuff that rock ‘n roll legends are made of and the emerging American rock bands at the top of the charts in the mid-’90s (think Foo FightersGin Blossoms,Collective SoulStone Temple Pilots) were either faceless or guileless. Coming out of the excess of the Sunset Strip hair metal scene of the ’80s, the rockers of the ’90s were the dullest bunch of drips possible. Nirvana and Pearl Jam fashioned themselves as anti-rock stars, taking the polar opposite pose of the self-indulgent excess of the L.A. scene that dominated before them. With the lone exceptions of the Smashing Pumpkins and Hole, whose singers Billy Corrigan and Courtney Love rarely met a microphone they couldn’t say something petty into, rock music in the ’90s was marked by a parade of dull rock stars with derivative hits. At least Blur and Oasis were willing to go balls to the wall about it.

If anything, Blur and Oasis could be compared to the hip hop wars happening in America. They were not Tupac and the Notorious B.I.G., as no one quite took it to the lengths of having a shoot out, but they were ostensibly the Jay-Z and Nas of the rock universe. The posturing and rock star behaviors that had marked stars of the ’60s and ’70s were being taken over by hip hop stars in the ’90s. Blur and Oasis were the last men standing on the “bad behaviors allowed only by rock stars” mountain — to epic proportions we have not seen since.

1996 would bring Oasis their greatest success in the form of their enduring single “Wonderwall” and turning their album (What’s The Story) Morning Glory into the biggest selling British album of the ‘90s. The band who had not considered themselves part of the Britpop movement had cut the definitive, best selling and most critically lauded Britpop album of all time. Both are regarded as the pinnacle of Noel Gallagher’s career.

Blur would see a major overhaul when “Song 2” from their 1997 self-titled album became a world-wide hit and the noose with which the band almost hung itself. While the album was a step away from the British-centric songs that defined their early career, it was also a reinvention.

The song Albarn, Coxon and Gallagher played together is from Blur’s 1999 album, 13 – an ode to Albarn’s failed relationship with Frischmann and one of the best in their catalog. “Tender” is a ballad with the same enduring sing-along quality of “Song 2” for very dour people. That this particular group of people would collaborate on any song is a miracle, but naturally the choice would have to be a song released well beyond the days of their Britpop rivalry.

At this point in their lives, the men of Oasis have gone their separate ways. Noel Gallagher left the group in 2009 and Liam rechristened them Beady Eye. Blur took a well-documented break after their 2003 album Think Tank, with Albarn leaving to create two supergroups: Gorillaz and the Good, the Bad & the Queen. Blur reunited in 2008 and have focused on festival performances, releasing only a few new singles and killing off a recording session for a new album for the time being.

Time heals all wounds. Noel Gallagher has undoubtedly become more tolerant, possibly owing to the removal of Liam the instigator from his life and his arrogance certainly took a backseat after critical and sales reception to Oasis albums tapered off in the 2000′s. Albarn has spiraled off from Britpop into more obscure musical endeavors, with forays into African, world and electronic music under his belt. Neither seem keen to hold on to that Mick Jagger swagger “rock star for life” pose. But for a decade, they were the picture perfect examples of a rock star feud. http://bit.ly/14k8fdQ

 

Kraftwerk‘s fusion of art, beats and electronics has become a template copied by musicians everywhere. Now they plan to take London’s Tate Modern by storm

Kraftwerk 1981 tour

Kraftwerk on their 1981 UK tour. Photograph: Fraser Gray/Rex Features
Back in September 1975, a band played in Britain for the very first time. On stages from Croydon to Bath, from Southport to Yeovil, they wore smart suits and ties and played peculiar instruments. There was no clamour for tickets, no feverish press. This review of a half-full show in Newcastle was par for the course: “Spineless, emotionless sound with no variety, less taste… [and] damn little attempt to pull off anything experimental, artistically satisfying or new,” wrote Keith Ging in theMelody Maker. “For God’s sake,” he railed, “keep the robots out of music.”

Here in the 21st century, Kraftwerk‘s forthcoming gigs at Tate Modern are the hottest tickets around. Back in December, demand for them crashed the gallery’s website; angry fans who missed out stormed the venue, while thousands raged online. For eight nights in February, Ralf Hütter, Fritz Hilpert, Henning Schmitz and Falk Grieffenhagen will play each Kraftwerk album since 1974 in turn – from their fourth, Autobahn, to 2003’s Tour De France Soundtracks – with 3D film versions of their iconic visuals. They will wear neoprene neon suits and stand behind expensive technology. They did the same to rapturous reception in 2012 at New York’s Moma and at the Kunstammlung in their hometown, Düsseldorf, last month.

These are art-event spectaculars to which everyone wants entry because no other band since the Beatles has given so much to pop culture. Kraftwerk’s beats laid the foundations for club music: for hip-hop, synth-pop, techno and house. The sounds they invented have been sampled by hundreds of artists, from Madonna to R.E.M, from Missy Elliott to Fergie. Coldplay and Jay-Z have had hits with their elegant melodies and their image has influenced David Bowie, Daft Punk and Kanye West. We also now live in the kind of world their future-obsessed lyrics predicted: we find Computer Love online, models smile from time to time and Europe Endless exists.

For hardcore followers, the fact that this band named after a power station are playing in one is also irresistible. The band that remaining founder member Hütter always called musikarbeiter – musical workers – will be creating energy themselves, in their own Turbine Hall.

Kraftwerk’s story begins in 1968, in Düsseldorf, a city closer to Belgium, Holland and France than the Iron Curtain. Two young men born just after the end of the second world war meet on a music improvisation course. Ralf Hütter plays keyboards, Florian Schneider the flute; they perform their first gig at the city’s Cream Cheese Club. Playing in Organisation, a progressive, free-form group, they become obsessed with synthesisers, which are newly invented. In 1970, the wealthy Schneider buys one. The same year, they see Gilbert and George in the city’s Kunsthalle: two men wearing suits and ties, claiming to bring art into everyday life. The same year, Hütter and Schneider start bringing everyday life into art and form Kraftwerk.

Kraftwerk’s first three albums do not feature in the Tate gigs, but they hold clues to the aesthetic roots of the band. The cover art for Kraftwerk(1970) and Kraftwerk 2 (1972) have pop art traffic cones on their sleeves, suggesting a more industrial take on Warhol’s Velvet Underground banana. Tracks have mechanical titles, such as Spule 4 (Inductor 4) and Wellelange (Wavelength), and then come the songs about Germany. Some, such as Heimatklänge (The Bells of Home), are gentler, but Von Himmel Hoch (From Heaven Above) is provocative. Named after a carol by Bach, it features synthesisers replicating the sounds of warplanes and bombs. It also reveals Kraftwerk trying to make a new national music, rooted in everyday sounds, made by machines that offered a new future.

Next came Autobahn, named after another German invention. In spring 1975, a radio edit of its 22-minute title track became an international hit. Its synthesisers mimicked fast traffic and car horns; its celebration of driving clicked with western audiences. Soon after, Wolfgang Flür and Karl Bartos joined the band on electronic percussion, as did the new smart aesthetic on stage. Electronic music suddenly had its John, Paul, George and Ringo, although they looked and sounded very different to the rock bands of the time.

It’s not that Kraftwerk didn’t flirt with sinister ideas. Radio-Activity (1975) began with the sound of a geiger counter, evoking nuclear dread. But their music also played with double meanings and humour. Ohm Sweet Ohm (say it out loud) took central European pop into the realm of technology, while Radio-Activity‘s title track hinted at the utopian possibilities of the wireless. (It also says much that the 1991 remix of this song mentioned power stations Sellafield and Chernobyl in negative terms.) Throughout the melodies and methods, their vocal lines and lyrics, there is a touching innocence and simplicity.

Hütter often namechecked the Bauhaus movement, and liked its internationalism. The band’s songs started to feature words in different languages; they got inspired by James Brown’s funk, and even punk (years later, Hütter admitted that the start of 1977’s Showroom Dummies – “eins-zwei-drei-vier” – came from The Ramones’ “one-two-three-four”). Autobahn’s chorus The (“wi’r fahr’n fahr’n fahr’n”) echoed The Beach Boys’ Fun, Fun, Fun. But a statement of Hütter’s from 1979, pinned to a noticeboard in Chris Petit’s cult film Radio On, reveals how Kraftwerk linked the past and the present. “We are the children of Fritz Lang and Werner von Braun,” it began, naming the film director who fled the Nazis, and the scientist who made the V-2 bomb and the Apollo mission rocket, Saturn V. “We are the link between the 20s and 80s. All change in society passes through a sympathetic collaboration with tape recorders, synthesisers and telephones. Our reality is an electronic reality.”

This forward-thinking spirit had already started to infect pop. David Bowie adored Kraftwerk, writing the track V-2 Schneider for his 1977 albumHeroes (the band would namecheck him back on Trans-Europe Express). African American DJs also found an odd kinship with the Germans. Keen to find a new musical language, they were familiar with the urban sounds Kraftwerk were using; 1978’s The Robots became particularly influential on the dancefloor, and in the burgeoning B-Boy and breakdancing scenes. Afrika Bambaataa fused the melody of Trans-Europe Express and the rhythm of 1981’s Numbers to create Planet Rock, one of hip-hop’s pioneering tracks. Trailblazing electro group Cybotron used a loop from 1977’s Hall of Mirrors; its founder, Juan Atkins, would create techno, and from there came modern dance culture.

Ever since, using a Kraftwerk sample has been shorthand for credibility. Jay-Z’s 1997 Sunshine sampled The Man-Machine, while Coldplay’s Talk made a melody from Computer World into a stadium-rock riff. Music producer DJ Food, a collector of Kraftwerk cover versions, says the band’s influence can be heard today among the micro-genres that have evolved from dance and R&B. “Hear dubstep producer 6Blocc’s cheeky reinterpretation of Numbers/Computer World 2 disguised under the title,Digits. Or across the pond, juke and footstep producers such as Traxman have shoe-horned Kraftwerk samples into songs such as The Robot. Kraftwerk have been part of the lineage of dance culture since the late 70s – approaching it without them is impossible.”

Read more about Krafwerk here: Why Kraftwerk are still the world’s most influential band | Music | The Observer.

What Kraftwerk are about now is the souped-up live experience. Playing in galleries, they align themselves with art over pop. Catherine Wood, curator of contemporary art and performance at Tate Modern, has had several meetings with Hütter. He approached her about his idea for the shows in 2010, through German gallery owner Monika Sprüth. Wood was then flown out to Düsseldorf, where she visited Kraftwerk’s Kling Klang studios. This notoriously mysterious space, where outside contact has always been forbidden, even by telephone, was moved 10 miles outside the city four years ago. Inside, Wood found an impeccable, minimalist office and a huge studio, with four robots against a wall, lit in glowing green lights.

 

STARS ON KRAFTWERK

JUAN ATKINS
Musician; father of techno
I liked Kraftwerk from the first time I heard them on Showroom Dummies; the first single I bought was The Robots. Their music was totally synthesised, really pure, very melodic and very funky, and that was hard to do with early electronics. They also listened to James Brown a lot, and you can hear that. I was inspired by the precision and the tightness of their sound… they were a cog that changed the direction of things. Without them, electronic music would be totally different. There probably wouldn’t even be dance music.
Juan Atkins plays at London’s Netil 000 on 2 February

SARAH CRACKNELL
Pop singer/songwriter, Saint Etienne
My friend Douglas introduced me to Kraftwerk in the very early 80s. I hardly believed him when he said Ralf und Florian was recorded in 1973. How could that be? It sounded like future music to me. I loved the sparse simplicity of their songs, and the repetitiveness. If a lyric or melody sounds good, why change it? Their influence on Saint Etienne has been indirect but strong. We recorded [2000’s] Sound of Water in Berlin with [electro band] To Rococo Rot, who were Kraftwerk nuts. [TRR bassist] Stefan was from Düsseldorf too, so he got authenticity bonus points! We played at a festival in a Spanish bullring a few years ago, and Karl Bartos was on before us. I wasn’t expecting him to dress in full robot regalia, but I thought he was going to look a bit icy at least. Instead he was virtually whooping, “Come on! You wanna hear Trans Europe Express? Let’s do it!” It was Kraftwerk’s greatest hits and, to be honest, it was great – probably a lot more fun than seeing them at an art gallery.

PETER SAVILLE
Artist; album sleeve designer
Autobahn was the first album I bought for myself. It made me curious about classical music, the idea of Europe, and that cover had a profoundly significant effect: it made me realise how a greater landscape of possibility could come from one image. It made us think about travelling through a continent, but also travelling through time. It looked like a cathedral and a power station. Factory’s industrial aesthetic came from there too, and that imagery came to define Manchester, the first industrial city. Kraftwerk playing at the Manchester Velodrome [in 2009] meant everything. It broke my heart that Tony Wilson wasn’t there to see it.
See some of Peter Saville’s designs here (unofficial site)

NIGHTWAVE
Electro musician (UK bass; footwork)
I grew up in socialist Yugoslavia, so these records were difficult to come by, but my dad played their music when I was little. My first impression of Kraftwerk was that it sounded like being in a computer game or a sci-fi movie. It was sometimes quite dark, but it could also be beautiful and playful, like a journey through this weird unknown land. It cast a spell that led me to eventually have a go at my own electronic production. The euphoria I experienced seeing them in 2000 in their neoprene … it was the best boy band there ever was.
Hear Nightwave here

Watch Thom Yorke and Nigel Godrich Perform Live in London

Photo by Erez Avissar

Last night, as promisedThom Yorke and Nigel Godrich performed in London to celebrate the release of their Atoms for Peace album Amok(It’s out Monday in Europe and Tuesday in the U.S. via XL Recordings.) Now, watch a 30-minute clip of last night’s show via Consequence of Sound.

Read more here: http://bit.ly/XLN530

Stream Amok:

 

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Tom wins at the BRIT Awards
Tom wins at the BRIT Awards
Tom was at the BRIT Awards on Wednesday to collect his Critics’ Choice award – you can watch the interview with him and Emeli Sandé here (it’s about 35 minutes in).


Tom performs live on Burberry’s catwalk
Tom performs live on Burberry’s catwalk
On Monday afternoon, Tom closed Burberry’s womenswear show as part of London Fashion Week. In a truly special show, he performed an extended version of his new single,Hold Me that you can watch on Burberry’s Youtube channel here.

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Matt Bellamy (Photo: AFP)

Matt Bellamy (Photo: AFP)

After spending the past few weeks in Los Angeles in order to take part in variousGRAMMY Awards activities, Muse will return to London to headline the 2013 Brit Awards in support of War Child’s 20th anniversary. The benefit concert will take place at the historic theater, O2 Shepherd’s Bush Empire.

With the concert having sold out in less than three minutes, this is the only way to watch Muse’s performance. The webcast can be seen live via War Child’s YouTube channel, Monday, February 18 at 4 pm EST / 1 pm PST.

War Child is a group of 27 individuals working in an old false teeth factory in north London with the single goal of aiding children of war-torn areas. The non-profit organization provides medical care and safe havens, rebuilds schools and helps children get their voices heard.

Bands that have previously played the War Child concert include ColdplayThe KillersBlur and Kasabian.

Read more here: Muse To Stream War Child Concert Live From London « The World Famous KROQ – Alt Rock Music News, Photos, Videos, Concerts.

Watch the band make the concert announcement as they knock a ball back and forth on their personally branded ping pong table.

– Jay Tilles, CBS Local

 

 

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Tom Odell releases ‘Hold Me’ on April 1. The track serves as the lead single from his debut album Long Way Down, which follows on April 15. Watch the official music video below:

Muse have revealed their new video for ‘Supremacy’ exclusively via NME.com – watch it above.

The video, which sees a group of goths heading to the beach and riding bikes while holding flaming swords, accompanies the fourth single to be released from Muse’s 2012 album ‘The 2nd Law’.

Muse are set to play this year’s perform at the BRIT Awards. They will also play a special charity show at London’s Shepherds Bush Empire for War Child in March.

_adele

The multiplatinum songbird will be performing her hit song “Skyfall” at the Academy Awards next month, the show’s organizers announced Wednesday, eonline.com reported

“Skyfall” single was recorded at Abbey Road Studios in London, where famous albums were previously created by The Beatles and Pink Floyd. It was released on October 5 (Global James Bond day), and it debuted at #8 on the Billboard Hot 100. It is the first Bong song nominated for an Oscar since “For Your Eyes Only” in 1981. The album is also the highest charting since 1985’s A VIEW TO A KILL. It is the second Bond soundtrack in the franchise’s 50-year history to not feature the title track on the album and is solely comprised of the Oscar-nominated score of Thomas Newman.

 

The British Academy Film Awards are scheduled for Feb. 10 at the Royal Opera House in London.

_BAFTA-2013

LONDON – Lincoln leads the pack of nominations for this year’s upcoming British Academy Film Awards, presented by the British Academy of Film And Television Arts and sponsored by cellphone giant EE, securing 10 nominations.
Jeremy Irvine (Warhorse) and Alice Eve (Men in Black 3)were on hand at BAFTA’s central London HQ to announce the nominations for this year’s awards.

Les Misérables and Life of Pi are each nominated in nine categories while Skyfall has eight nominations.

Argo has seven nominations and Anna Karenina has six.

Django Unchained and Zero Dark Thirty are each nominated five times.

The winners will be presented with their nods at a ceremony scheduled for Sunday, Feb. 10 at the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden in the British capital.

The awards ceremony will be followed by a swanky official black tie dinner at the Grosvenor House Hotel on Park Lane.

The ceremony will be hosted by Stephen Fry and will be broadcast on BBC America in the US and in the U.K. on BBC 1.

The awards, presented by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), will be handed out at a ceremony scheduled for Sunday, Feb. 10 here at the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden.

BAFTA organizers resisted moving the scheduled dates for the nominations after a decision in the U.S. to move the Academy Awards nominations day to Jan. 10, leaving a day between them.

–written by start kemp for hollywoodreporter.com. image from celebscoop.co.uk

 

Suede release new song 'Barriers' as free download

Photo: Andy Willsher/NME

Suede have given fans new song ‘Barriers’ as a free download today (Jan 7). The track is the first to be heard from the band’s brand new studio album, which will be titled ‘Bloodsports’.

‘Bloodsports’ will be Suede’s sixth studio album and their first since 2002. ‘Barriers’ is the first song to be lifted from the album, due out in March, and is available from their official website now. An official single, titled ‘It Starts And Ends With You‘, is due for release in February.

Speaking about the new Suede material, frontman Brett Anderson told NME: “After a year of sweating and bleeding over the record it’s finally finished so we wanted to get some music out there as soon as we could. ‘Barriers’ isn’t the first single but we are proud enough of it to just chuck it out there and thought that its pulsing, romantic swell somehow summed up the feel of the album quite nicely. The album is called ‘Bloodsports’. It’s about lust, it’s about the chase, it’s about the endless carnal game of love. It was possibly the hardest we ever made but certainly is the most satisfying. It’s ten furious songs have reclaimed for me what Suede was always about: drama, melody and noise.”

Suede will also perform a huge London show at Alexandra Palace to coincide with the release of ‘Bloodsports’ in March. The band will headline the venue on Saturday, March 30. Tickets are available now.

Listen and Download here below:

 

— articles and images taken from nme.com

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