Tag Archive: Inglourious Basterds


 

With Quentin Tarantino‘s Django Unchained recently becoming the director’s most successful film at the worldwide box office, it’s only a matter of time before he completes his much-rumored final film in his unofficial revenge trilogy, which kicked of with Inglourious Basterds.

His Oscar-winning star Christoph Waltz stopped by Saturday Night Live to host this weekend and delivered a fun little short that changes history once again, but this time with the resurrection of Jesus, as Jordan Raup for thefilmstage.com reported. With Djesus Uncrossed, Waltz plays our “hero” and he’s joined by Ving Rhames, Brad Pitt, Samuel L. Jackson, buckets of blood and thankfully, no sign of a Tarantino cameo. Check it out the video here: http://bit.ly/XfBLgm

Made by Jonathan Keogh. Enjoy!

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In 2009, Quentin Tarantino did a brief interview with Sky Movies ahead of the release of Inglorious Bastards. Long regarded as a walking movie encyclopedia, Tarantino rattled off a list of his 20 favorite films since 1992 — the year he made his directorial debut with Reservoir Dogs. Kinji Fukasaku’s Battle Royale is the only film the director cited as his runaway pick for number one, but he declined to rank the others, opting instead to name them in alphabetical order (listed below).

1. Battle Royale (Kinji Fukasaku, 2000)
2. Anything Else (Woody Allen, 2003)
3. Audition (Takashi Miike, 1999)
4. The Blade (Hark Tsui, 1995)
5. Boogie Nights (Paul Thomas Anderson, 1997)
6. Dazed & Confused (Richard Linklater, 1993)
7. Dogville (Lars von Trier, 2003)
8. Fight Club (David Fincher, 1999)
9. Friday (F. Gary Gray, 1995)
10. The Host (Joon-ho Bong, 2006)
11. The Insider (Michael Mann, 1999)
12. Joint Security Area (Chan-wook Park, 2000)
13. Lost In Translation (Sofia Coppola, 2003)
14. The Matrix (Andy Wachowski & Larry Wachowski, 1999)
15. Memories of Murder (Joon-ho Bong, 2003)
16. Supercop (Stanley Tong, 1992)
17. Shaun of the Dead (Edgar Wright, 2004)
18. Speed (Jan de Bont, 1994)
19. Team America (Trey Parker, 2004)
20. Unbreakable (M. Night Shyamalan, 2000)

More about Tarantino here: http://bit.ly/Vt86Sz image taken from fansshare.com

Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Killer Crow’ To Complete ‘Basterds’ and ‘Django’ Trilogy?

Iconic post-modern filmmaker Quentin Tarantino incorporated spaghetti western elements throughout his throwback Kung Fu revenge tale Kill Bill, followed by the Nazi-killing adventure Inglourious Basterds. How appropriate, then, that he should go on to create a proper homage to the genre with Django Unchained (read ourreview), which is currently stirring up the pot of controversy over its depiction of slavery and African-American history.

Now, the auteur is planning to round out his historical revenge fantasy trilogy with a final installment that likewise builds on Django by fully saluting the Blaxploitation genre – and incorporates Basterds‘ men-on-a-mission sub-genre inspiration – that could go under the title Killer Crow.

Earlier this month, Tarantino sat down for an interview with The Roots editor-in-chief and professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. Their discussion was focused on Django – including, cinematic traditions it draws from and the film’s depiction of slavery – but it began with the writer-director (and occasional actor) being asked “What’s next on the list of oppressors to off?”

Tarantino offered the following:

I don’t know exactly when I’m going to do it, but there’s something about this that would suggest a trilogy. My original idea for Inglourious Basterds way back when was that this [would be] a huge story that included the [smaller] story that you saw in the film, but also followed a bunch of black troops, and they had been f–ked over by the American military and kind of go apes–t. They basically — the way Lt. Aldo Raines (Brad Pitt) and the Basterds are having an “Apache resistance” — [the] black troops go on an Apache warpath and kill a bunch of white soldiers and white officers on a military base and are just making a warpath to Switzerland.

What’s interesting about this proposition is that such a film would indeed build on the themes of Django, which (in its own Tarantino-esque way) is about the birth of the archetypal Blaxploitation protagonist. Quite literally, as Tarantino revealed at Comic-Con that he imagined the eponymous character (Jamie Foxx) and his wife Broomhilda von Shaft (Kerry Washington) to be John Shaft’s ancestors. Therefore,Killer Crow would explore the next stage in the (pseudo-)history of Blaxploitation cinema, while also bringing things full circle to the WW II setting of Basterds:

So that was always going to be part of it. And I was going to do it as a miniseries, and that was going to be one of the big storylines. When I decided to try to turn it into a movie, that was a section I had to take out to help tame my material. I have most of that written. It’s ready to go; I just have to write the second half of it.

Tarantino added that such a project would be called Killer Crow (“or something like that”) and unfold after the Normandy invasion in 1944, concurrent with Basterds. Moreover, he indicated some of the Basterds could make an appearance since the two stories immediately overlap. Who knows, maybe one of Django’s descendants will be among the character ranks, lending further credence to the popular unified QT universe theory.

Jamie Foxx in Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained

Jamie Foxx is ‘Django Unchained’

Django has incited outrage for reasons ranging from the savage nature of its world to its anachronistic mix of elements, be it the soundtrack or visual shout-outs to other films. Of course, the heavy use of racial epithets continues to prompt anger from prominent black artists like Spike Lee (who’s bound to have something to say about QT planning a film about black soldiers in WW II, following his own projectMiracle at St. Anna).

Here’s what Tarantino said, with regard to Django‘s portrayal of history:

Well, you know if you’re going to make a movie about slavery and are taking a 21st-century viewer and putting them in that time period, you’re going to hear some things that are going to be ugly, and you’re going see some things that are going be ugly. That’s just part and parcel of dealing truthfully with this story, with this environment, with this land. Personally, I find [the criticism] ridiculous. Because it would be one thing if people are out there saying, “You use [the n-word] much more excessively in this movie than it was used in 1858 in Mississippi.” Well, nobody’s saying that. And if you’re not saying that, you’re simply saying I should be lying. I should be watering it down. I should be making it more easy to digest.

No, I don’t want it to be easy to digest. I want it to be a big, gigantic boulder, a jagged pill and you have no water.

Indeed, the evolution of that derogatory term (and the culture of discrimination it symbolizes) has been quietly touched upon previously in Tarantino’s Pulp Fictionand Jackie BrownDjango shines an uncomfortable spotlight on the issue that makes it impossible to ignore. Expect Killer Crow to follow that trend – and keep the buzz (good and bad) circling Tarantino’s name once it finally sees the light of day.

For more insight about the research and thought process behind Django Unchained (which is now in theaters), check out The Root‘s full Tarantino interview.

Meanwhile, we’ll keep you posted on Killer Crow as the story develops.

 

-made by sandy schaefer for screenrant.com 

Watch: Official trailer for ‘Tarantino XX: 8-Film Collection’

Yahoo! Movies today unveiled the first full-length trailer for the Tarantino XX: 8-Film Collection — a comprehensive Blu-ray box set celebrating Quentin Tarantino’s 20 years of filmmaking. Featured in the collection are eight of Tarantino’s most iconic films, including Reservoir DogsPulp Fiction, Jackie Brown,Kill Bill Vols. I and IITrue RomanceDeath Proof, and Inglourious Basterds, plus two discs with five hours of all-new bonus material.

Tarantino XX will be available in stores on November 20th and you can pre-order your box set now!

–from miramax.com

Tarantino drops the needle

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You know it well. Mia Wallace OD’s. Vincent Vega freaks out. Lance brings out the adrenaline shot and Vincent plunges the needle in her heart. But that’s not the needle we’re talking about.

The ‘needle drop’ is a term used in movies when popular music is laid on a scene in place of traditional score. Nobody knows this better than Quentin Tarantino. In an interview with Arts District, Tarantino explains his attention to detail when it comes to music in film.

“To me, my soundtracks work as two different things.  They work as a little shadow version of the movie itself. If you like the movie and you want to carry it around with you and not have to watch the story all the time but still get the feel and sense of it, they allow you to do that.”

“There was a time—back before there was video, DVD and all of that stuff—when the soundtrack was how you remembered a movie.”

Tarantino talked to The Guardian about how he starts the process of choosing the right music for each film.

“More or less the way my method works is you have got to find the opening credit sequence first. That starts it off from me. I find the personality of the piece through the music that is going to be in it… Once I know I want to do something, then it is a simple matter of me diving into my record collection and finding the songs that give me the rhythm of my movie. I find the personality of the piece through the music that is going to be in it.”

Listen to Tarantino’s soundtracks on iTunes and let us know which is your favorite in the comments below.
Reservoir Dogs (Original Soundtrack)
Pulp Fiction (Original Soundtrack)
Jackie Brown (Original Soundtrack)
Kill Bill, Vol. 1 (Original Soundtrack)
Kill Bill, Vol. 2 (Original Soundtrack)
Death Proof (Original Soundtrack)
Inglourious Basterds (Original Soundtrack)
Django Unchained (Original Soundtrack)

Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction are returning to theaters this December, as one-day commemorative events. For more details and ticket information, click here. The Tarantino XX: 8-Film Collection is in stores now. Pick up yours today.

 

— from miramax.com

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