Tag Archive: IMAX


_a-good-day-to-die-hard-trailer-bruce-willis-john-mclane

Release Date: February 14, 2013 (2D theaters and IMAX)
Studio: 20th Century Fox
Director: John Moore
Screenwriter: Skip Woods
Starring: Bruce Willis, Jai Courtney, Sebastian Koch, Yulia Snigir, Cole Hauser, Amaury Nolasco, Megalyn Echikunwoke, Anne Vyalitsyna
Genre: Action, Adventure
MPAA Rating: Not Available
Official Website: DieHardmovie.com | Facebook
Review: Not Available
DVD Review: Not Available
DVD: Not Available
Movie Poster: Not Available
Production Stills: View here

Plot Summary: Since the first “Die Hard” in 1988, John McClane has found himself in the wrong place at the wrong time, with the skills and attitude to always be the last man standing, making him enemy #1 for terrorists the world over. Now, McClane faces his greatest challenge ever, this time on an international stage, when his estranged son Jack is caught up in the daring prison escape of a rogue Russian leader, and father and son McClane must work together to keep each other alive and keep the world safe for democracy.

 

— words from comingsoon.net image taken from flickeringmyth.com

 

10 Questions From The ‘Star Trek 2′ Trailers

 

Star Trek Into Darkness Questions

In the last two weeks, Paramount has released a one-minute announcement video, a nine-minute IMAX preview and a full trailer for the upcoming Star Trek Into Darkness. Even with all of this footage, the film’s story and primary antagonist remain shrouded in mystery. Such is the way of J.J. Abrams projects. From the two online teasers released thus far, we’ve compiled 10 questions worth pondering from some interesting stills we’ve pulled from the video, some of which were carefully edited out of order.

The Hand Mystery

In this scene reminiscent of the iconic Kirk-Spock moment at the end of Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, Spock offers a “live long and prosper” gesture to an unconfirmed second party.Is this scene going to have similar results? Is that Kirk or John Harrison‘s hand on the opposite side of the glass from Spock? Is this foreshadowing a sacrifice on the part of one of these characters as hinted at in the official Star Trek Into Darknesssynopsis?

The Starfleet Funeral

Who is the Starfleet funeral for and is this scene taking place before or after the all-out attack on Earth? Does Kirk lose his mom, making the crew of the Enterprise his only “family” left? Is Admiral Pike, a narrator of the teaser trailer, the focus of this service?

The Life Pods

Intentionally included as a quick shot after the funeral sequence in the trailer, this still features what appears to be life pods and not caskets, as evidenced by the frosted viewing glass – Oddly reminiscent of the SS Botany Bay where Khan and his group of genetically-enhanced Humans (Augments) lay cryogenically frozen in the main Star Trek timeline.Are these Augments and another hint at Khan, or something entirely different? Perhaps people sick of an ailment similar to that of the little girl in the IMAX prologue?

The Submarine

In the Star Trek Into Darkness announcement video, there are two separate shots involving a Starfleet vessel and water. One with a ship emerging from the water with warp nacelles entirely different than that of the Enterprise, and another with an Enterprise-shaped ship crashing into the water.What’s going on in the water (from the IMAX prologue) and what ship is this depicted on the bottom half of the image? Is it a re-designed Enterprise?

The Red Shirt

Pavel Chekov (Anton Yelchin) – who didn’t appear in the announcement video – is shown in the full trailer sporting a different uniform color. Has his position on the Enterprise changed? Is he now doomed as an infamous “red shirt”? Maybe it means nothing since others – including Uhura and Scotty – sport red uniforms as well.Will Chekov say “Nuclear Wessels“?

John Harrison in the Brig

Benedict Cumberbatch is playing a character named John Harrison as confirmed by Paramount Pictures and (secret) footage screened for the media, but it’s widely believed to be an alias to cover a secret identity. Who is John Harrison, what are his motivations, and why is he in the brig?Being imprisoned intentionally is all the rage these days – just ask Javier Bardem and Tom Hiddleston about their characters Silva and Loki in Skyfall and The Avengers, respectively (we’ll skip the Dark Knight reference… this time).

The Klingons

Klingons play an important part in Star Trek Into Darknessand we’ve already seen a brief glimpse of their homeworld Qo’noS in the teasers. Why does the crew of the Enterprise and the character of John Harrison go there and what is their part in the overall narrative? Is that a Klingon ship in this image?

Enterprise Battle Damage

In a very brief shot in the full Star Trek 2 teaser trailer, the Enterprise is clearly depicted with significant battle damage across the top of its saucer section and along the bottom of it, including the deflector array which is shown here on the left, offline and not functional.What confrontation and enemy caused this? Does the Enterprise survive its journey Into Darkness? Could this explain a potential redesign from the water sequence if that is in fact, the Enterprise?

Spock & Uhura

While Dr. Carol Marcus and Captain Kirk may not share romance in Star Trek Into Darkness, the unlikely relationship between Spock and Uhura continues and will be put to the test. Said J.J. Abrams to USA Today:“This movie tests a number of relationships. And one of them is theirs. What is it to date a Vulcan? He may be reliable, loyal, honest, logical and smart. But he also, to a fault, follows rules. Does that get in the way of love?”

The Sick Child

The Star Trek 2 IMAX prologue attached to The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey this weekend opens with a scene on Earth with two new characters, a couple (played by Noel Clarke and Nazneen Contractor) going to the hospital to visit their sick child. Clarke, emotional, goes outside and is confronted by John Harrison (Cumberbatch) who says he can help save her.How and what does Harrison want in exchange? What is Clarke’s character doing in this brief shot where he places a ring in a cup? Must he sacrifice himself and do something to aid Cumberbatch to save his daughter?“Is there anything you would not do for your family” is one of the themes of the film.

 

(Preview made by Rob Keyes for screentrant.com)

Box Office Results: The Hobbit Sets New December Opening Weekend Record

the hobbit

The ComingSoon.net Box Office Report has been updated with studio estimates for the weekend. Clickhere for the full box office estimates of the top 12 films and then check back on Monday for the final figures based on actual box office.

New Line Cinema and MGM’s The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey kicked off the holiday season with an estimated $84.8 million, a new December opening weekend record, surpassing the $77.2 million earned by Will Smith-starrer I Am Legend the same weekend in 2007. The Peter Jackson film debuted in 4,045 theaters in which it averaged a strong $20,958 per location.

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey received an A CinemaScore from moviegoers which should help with word-of-mouth through the holidays. 58% of the audience was over the ages of 25 and males made up 57% of the audience.

$10.1 million of the domestic total came from the 326 IMAX theaters the film opened in this weekend. That’s an average of $31,000 per screen. Internationally, the picture broke an IMAX December record grossing $5 million in 126 IMAX locations (an average of $40,000). The IMAX locations which showed the film in 48 fps were quite strong, generating $44,000 per screen domestically and $57,000 per screen internationally. IMAX’s global weekend total for “The Hobbit” is an estimated $15+ million, which is a record for December.

In North America, DreamWorks Animation’s Rise of the Guardians remained in second place with $7.4 million for a four-week total of $71.4 million. The animated family adventure cost about $145 million to make.

DreamWorks Pictures‘ Lincoln climbed a spot to third with $7.2 million. The $65 million Steven Spielberg film has earned $107.9 million after six weeks in theaters.

Dropping from first place to fourth, Sony and MGM’s Skyfall added $7 million domestically for a total of $272.4 million after six weeks. Internationally, the 23rd James Bond film grossed an estimated $12.2 million this weekend, bringing the overseas total to $678.7 million. Worldwide, the film has earned $951 million to date.

Ang Lee’s Life of Pi rounded out the top five with $5.4 million its fourth weekend. The Twentieth Century Fox Film release has collected $69.6 million after four weeks.

Also, Summit’s The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 2 earned $45.2 million its fifth weekend for a domestic total of $276.9 million.

Weekend Box Office

December 14, 2012 – December 16, 2012 

TW LW Title Studio Weekend Theaters Total Week
1 The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey New Line Cinema (Warner Bros. Pictures)
$84,775,000
4,045
$84,775,000
1
2 2 Rise of the Guardians DreamWorks Animation
$7,420,000
3,387
$71,362,000
4
3 4 Lincoln DreamWorks Pictures
$7,244,000
2,285
$107,898,000
6
4 1 Skyfall Columbia Pictures (Sony), MGM
$7,000,000
2,924
$272,366,000
6
5 5 Life of Pi 20th Century Fox
$5,400,000
2,548
$69,559,000
4
6 3 The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 2 Summit Entertainment
$5,175,000
3,042
$276,865,000
5
7 7 Wreck-It Ralph Walt Disney Pictures
$3,273,000
2,249
$168,779,000
7
8 6 Playing for Keeps FilmDistrict
$3,247,000
2,840
$10,838,000
2
9 8 Red Dawn FilmDistrict
$2,394,000
2,250
$40,889,000
4
10 11 Silver Linings Playbook The Weinstein Company
$2,084,000
371
$16,954,000
5
11 9 Flight Paramount Pictures
$1,940,000
1,823
$89,448,000
7
12 Argo Warner Bros. Pictures
$1,145,000
667
$104,930,000
10

 

Source: comingsoon.net

 

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey’ 48 FPS 3D – Good or Bad?

The-Hobbit-Unexpected-Journey-HFR-Poster

Most critics have weighed in with their thoughts about director Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (read our review), with the reactions varying accordingly. However, the most commonly-derided aspect is the film’s appearance when projected in its native format: 48 frames per second (fps) 3D, which is twice the standard for theater showings. The issue has hounded An Unexpected Journeysince Jackson premiered footage in 48 fps at CinemaCon 2012; lately, he seems to be spending more time discussing the format (or, rather, defending it) than other film elements, thematic and technical alike.

Warner Bros. is noticeably concerned about blowback, as evidenced by the limited rollout and lack of surcharge for 48 fps Hobbit screenings. Jackson is ready to embrace it as a new storytelling tool but for studios, the jury’s still out on whether 48 fps is the next ‘big thing’ (see: 3D and/or IMAX) or the latest in a line of failed attempts to shake up the viewing experience (Smell-o-vision, anyone?) – and by that we mean, something that audiences will pay for.

What the higher frame-rate does is remove that thin layer of graininess that allows viewers to distinguish between images projected on a theater screen (something artificial) and their surroundings in the real world, purely on the basis of sight. This results in camera and actors’ movements onscreen appearing faster than normal; not to mention, it makes it all the more obvious when practical effects (be it sets, props, makeup or costumes) and CGI have been manufactured on the cheap.

HD televisions and Blu-rays have a similar impact, revealing the imperfections and flaws in older titles (and newer ones, at that) which were previously masked by the haziness afforded from lower frame-rate projections. Similarly, motion onscreen in general is often perceived as sped-up and therefore blurrier, simply because so many longtime viewers are accustomed to the ‘slowdown’ effect of the traditional 24 frame-rate screening (going back to the early 20th century, that is).

the hobbit-unexpected-journey-reviews

An Unexpected Journey, by comparison, doesn’t suffer so much from those issuesbecause Jackson and his collaborators took added transparency into consideration while shooting at 48 fps; hence, viewers are actually meant to be able to see the finer details. As a result, the fine craftsmanship of film artists who work with their hands, basic machinery or state-of-the-art computers is easier to appreciate; not to mention, scenes where human and CGI players interact seem more believable (as both now look equally “real”).

Of course, this presents a philosophical dilemma: Should these things look “real?” Middle-earth, as presented in The Hobbit, is the sort of fairytale kingdom that one might conjure up from their imagination (as J.R.R. Tolkien did so many years ago). When you reduce artificiality and instill a heightened sense of realism, it dwindles the sensation of peering into a dreamworld; worse, it leaves some people with the same (bad) impression as a low-budget recording of a stage performance. That’s why some have dismissed Jackson’s Hobbit ’experiment’ as misguided at best, a gimmick with little artistic merit at worst.

the hobbit bilbo-rivendell-hobbit-trailer-570x244

Andrew Lesnie’s cinematography throughout An Unexpected Journey uses 3D to its advantage, combing subtle (but constant) camera motion with sweeping crane and aerial shots to generate an immersive visual design. Moreover, when viewed with the 48 fps format, the grandiose shots of environments both real (the New Zealand landscape) and fake (tunnels and mines in the Lonely Mountain) end up bearing a stronger resemblance to a model; that holds true for the individuals that populate them, be they computer-generated or genuine.

Again, this quality can be a distraction and jarring for those not prepared. However, it (arguably) allows cinematic visuals to better imitate what the real world looks like to the human eye, when perceived from either a great height or up close. This also makes the 3D viewing experience smoother and less cumbersome (ie. higher fps = fewer headaches). Moreover, it seems to reduce the frequency of 3D images that take on a pop-up book appearance and benefits certain camera techniques (like changing the depth of field). Indeed, that makes 3D and 48 fps a natural fit.

The-Hobbit-Third-Film-New-Title-and-Release-Date

Jackson’s intention with these technical choices is quite apparent: the more real various components of Middle-earth look, the more moviegoers will feel as though they’ve been transported there (in theory). It’s not meant to distract from key storytelling elements (narrative structure, pacing); rather, it’s meant to enhance. Whether or not it inadvertently ends up serving the former rather that latter and intended purpose, is the basis for continuing debates about the subject.

Interestingly enough, the 48 fps format might be best-suited for films that aren’t reliant on heavy amounts of digital shots or big-budget panache; that is, smaller projects aiming for something closer to cinéma vérité would benefit more from the crystal-clear visual presentation. On the other hand (as mentioned before), that format does reduce physical stress from 3D viewing and helps to seamlessly blend practical/CGI components. Its storytelling value is flexible, depending on what the director is going for (similar to the partial use of IMAX in such films as The Dark Knight Rises).

the hobbit

Jackson perhaps put it best himself when he clarified that increased frame-rate projection is not meant to be an industry game-changer (a la color, sound, 3D). To quote:

“The big thing to realize is that it’s not an attempt to change the film industry. It’s another choice. The projectors that can run at 48 frames can run at 24 frames – it doesn’t have to be one thing or another. You can shoot a movie at 24 frames and have sequences at 48 or 60 frames within the body of the film. You can still do all the shutter-angle and strobing effects. It doesn’t necessarily change how films are going to be made. It’s just another choice that filmmakers have got and for me, it gives that sense of reality that I love in cinema.”

(reviewed by sandy schaefer. images taken from screenrant.com)

 

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