Tag Archive: Iggy Pop


Image for Ten film soundtracks better than The Great Gatsby

Earlier today director Baz Luhrmann and executive producer Jay-Z released the soundtrack to The Great Gatsby and, on paper at least, it seems like a winner. Not only does it feature the likes of Florence and The MachineThe xxSia and Gotye, it’s got new material from Lana Del Rey and a host of covers: Beyonce andAndre 3000 doing Amy Winehouse’s ‘Back In Black’, Brian Ferry doing ‘Crazy in Love’ and Jack White’s take on U2’s ‘Love Is Blindness’ (which first appeared on a 2011 tribute album). But for The Great Gatsby to really cut through, it has to be more than just a compilation. Here are 10 soundtracks that not only sound good as a party playlist, but also conjure pivotal moments in their respective films. Listen to complete soundtracks here: http://bit.ly/Xurm0M

Trainspotting (1996)

Regarded as one of the best British films of the past 20 years Trainspotting, director Danny Boyle, used an A-list cast of musical talent to give the film that extra bit of punch (like it actually needed more!). Featuring tracks from David BowieLou ReedIggy Pop and Underworld, the CD release of the soundtrack was so successful they put out another disk – and it was just as good.

Soundtrack highlight: A three-way tie: the energetic intro scene featuring ‘Lust For Life’, Ewan McGregor OD’ing to ‘Perfect Day’ and Underworld’s ‘Born Slippy’ closing out the film.

Pulp Fiction (1994)

We all know Quentin Tarantino is the king of pop culture references, edgy dialogue and gore, but his impossibly good taste in music often gets overlooked. Featuring songs from Al Green (‘Let’s Stay Together’), Kool and the Gang (‘Jungle Boogie’) and Dusty Springfield (‘Son Of A Preacher Man’), not to mention Urge Overkill’s inspired cover of Neil Diamond’s ‘Girl, You’ll Be a Woman Soon’, _Pulp Fiction_’s soundtrack is as effortlessly cool as the film itself.

Soundtrack highlight: John Travolta and Uma Thurman dancing to Chuck Berry’s ‘You Never Can Tell’.

The Social Network (2010)

Who thought Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails would actually win an Oscar? But he deserves it for this brooding and ambient work – co-composed with Atticus Ross – that complemented the uneasy pace and tone of the film. The real genius of their score (and the script by Aaron Sorkin) is that it elevated a boring story about a bunch of geeks starting a website into a gripping film.

Soundtrack highlight: If you can pick a highlight out of a minimalist piano score, you’re doing one better than us.

Drive (2011)

The soundtrack to 2011’s Drive heavily featured Cliff Martinez – former guitarist for the likes of the Red Hot Chili Peppers and Captain Beefheart – who has now turned his attention to composing scores. His pulsating electro-pop aesthetic translated perfectly to the stretches of the film where heartthrob Ryan Gosling was on the road, escalating in intensity where the scene needed it to. The soundtrack also features a few great songs from the likes of Kavinsky, Chromatics and Desire, particularly ‘Under Your Spell’.

Soundtrack highlight: The infamous elevator scene featuring Brian Eno’s ambient ‘An Ending (Ascent)’.

Romeo + Juliet (1996)

Between Radiohead’s ‘Exit Music’, Butthole Surfers’ ‘Whatever (I Had a Dream)’ and Everclear’s ‘Local God’ nothing said “mid-’90s” quite like this soundtrack. Plus who would’ve thought that Garbage’s ‘#1 Crush’ could ever appear in a story written by Shakespeare? Or ‘Lovefool’ by The Cardigans, which became a hit single thanks to the film.

Soundtrack highlight: For the romantics: Des’ree’s ‘I’m Kissing You’ in the “fishtank scene”.

Judgement Night (1993)

The beginning of rap-rock for (better or worse), with every song on the soundtrack coupling a rock act with a hip-hop artist. There was the improbable Teenage Fanclub and De La Soul collaboration ‘Fallin’, Faith No Moreteaming up with Boo-Yaa T.R.I.B.E. for ‘Another Body Murdered’, Helmet and House of Pain doing ‘Just Another Victim’ (yes, they had songs other than ‘Jump Around’). The film itself is pretty unmemorable – it starred Emilio Estevez, Cuba Gooding Jr and Denis Leary as a bunch of mates who end up in the wrong part of town – but the soundtrack will stand the test of time.

Soundtrack highlight: The title track featuring Biohazard and Onyx nails the film’s gritty urban vibe.

Almost Famous (2000)

Like Tarantino, Cameron Crowe is another director that knows just when to drop the perfect song at the perfect time in one of his films (see: the “boombox scene” in Say Anything, or Tom Cruise belting out ‘Free Falling’ in Jerry Maguire). Almost Famous, which tells the (somewhat embellished) story of his early years as a Rolling Stone contributor, is like a nostalgia trip back into Crowe’s past – from The Beach Boys to Simon & Garfunkel, Yes to The Who. Even the songs by the film’s fictitious band Stillwater sound like they were writing four decades ago.

Soundtrack highlight: An entire tour bus belting out Elton John’s ‘Tiny Dancer’.

Singles (1992)

Another Cameron Crowe special. A movie about six people looking for love in Seattle, Singles helped spread the city’s nascent grunge scene to a national audience before it exploded into the mainstream via Nirvana. The film features some of the scene’s biggest names (Pearl Jam, Alice In Chains, Mudhoney and Soundgarden), a Chris Cornell solo track recorded on a four-track in his cupboard and some of Paul Westerberg’s better post-Replacements output (‘Waiting For Somebody’, ‘Dyslexic Heart’). Though uncredited, there’s a snippet of Jane’s Addiction’s ‘Three Days’ when Bridget Fonda opens a fridge.

Soundtrack highlight: The first airing of Soundgarden’s Spoonman two years before its release.

Friday (1995)

Starring Chris Tucker and Ice Cube, stoner comedy Friday was released just as the West Coast hip-hop movement was hitting its peak. As a result the film is soundtracked by California’s finest, with contributions from Cypress HillDr DreMack 10 and Cube himself, providing its title track. Amid all the rap was the inclusion of some smoother jams from the likes of Rick James and Bootsy Collins.

Soundtrack highlight: Hands down: Ice Cube and Chris Tucker rolling a fat one to the smooth stylings of Rick James’ ‘Mary Jane’.

Forrest Gump (1994)

An epic film with a suitably epic soundtrack. Thirty-two tracks with not one original song (bar the opening suite) among them, Forrest Gump’s score featured all the ‘60 to ‘70s big guns: Aretha FranklinCreedence Clearwater RevivalThe Beach BoysElvis. Much like the film itself, the list just goes on, and on, and on.

Soundtrack highlight: Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Fortunate Son’ as Forrest lands in Vietnam.

Singer reveals new role and urges teenagers to experience music on vinyl, saying that the internet is ‘no replacement for face-to-face interaction with a human being’

Jack White at the Grammy awards in February

‘Let’s wake each other up’ … Jack White at the Grammy awards in February. Photograph: PictureGroup / Rex Features

Jack White has been named the official ambassador of international Record Store Day on 20 April. The Third Man owner and White Stripes founder called on music fans to “wake each other up” and “experience something in the real world”.

White announced his role on the Record Store Day website, saying he would be “proud to help in any way I can to invigorate whoever will listen with the idea that there is beauty and romance in the act of visiting a record shop and getting turned on to something new that could change the way they look at the world, other people, art, and ultimately, themselves.”

As the founder of Third Man Records, White has played a prominent role in the resurgence of vinyl and the mainstreaming of record collecting. Artists ranging from Tom Jones to the Insane Clown Posse have issued limited-edition 7-inch records on Third Man, and hundreds of subscribers pay to receive every recording the label releases. While White’s company has yet to announce its plans for Record Store Day 2013, other confirmed releases include singles by PiL and David Bowie, and a vinyl reissue of the Flaming Lips‘ 1997 experiment Zaireeka.

More than 80 British shops participated in the 2012 Record Store Day, selling more than 450 special releases. It was “the biggest day ever for indie stores,” Spencer Hickman, of Rough Trade East, told Billboard. “My store was up 47%.” Previous Record Store Day ambassadors have included Iggy Pop and Ozzy OsbourneLet’s wake each other up.

Read more here: http://bit.ly/WQ43wX

Death of a President director Gabriel Range will explore pair’s friendship and collaborations in Germany in the 70s

David Bowie and Iggy Pop in 1978 and 1977 respectively

Lust for Life … David Bowie and Iggy Pop in 1978 and 1977 respectively. Photograph: Denis O’Regan/Getty Images and Howard Barlow/Redferns

Guardian.co.uk reported that a new film will tell the story of Iggy Pop and David Bowie‘s years in West Berlin. The British-German co-production will be directed by Gabriel Range, best-known for his movie about an imaginary assassination of George W Bush.

Read more here: http://bit.ly/WwIjrr

Lust for Life’s screenplay was written by Robin French, according to the Hollywood Reporter, based in large part on Paul Trynka’s books Starmanand Open Up and Bleed, which look at the lives of Bowie and Pop respectively. French is the co-creator of BBC3’s sitcom Cuckoo.

http://bit.ly/WwIjrr

_grohl

David Eric “Dave” Grohl (born January 14, 1969) is an American rock musicianmulti-instrumentalist, and singer-songwriter, who is the lead vocalistguitarist, primary songwriter and founder of the Foo Fighters. Prior to this, he was the drummer for the grunge band Nirvana. He is also the drummer and co-founder of the rock supergroup Them Crooked Vultures. Grohl has additionally written all the music and performed all the instruments for his short-lived side projects Late! and Probot, as well as being involved with Queens of the Stone Age numerous times throughout the past decade. He has performed session work (as a drummer) for a variety of musicians, including GarbageKilling JokeNine Inch NailsDavid BowiePaul McCartneyThe ProdigySlashIggy PopJuliette LewisTenacious DTom Petty and the Heartbreakers, and Lemmy, and the latest with Sir Paul McCartney.

Grohl arguably is the most busiest musician today. Not to mention Jack White and Mike Patton. Grohl is directing a documentary about Sound City Studios, the Van Nuys studio where Nevermind was recorded that shut down its music operations in 2011.  He also directs the new Soundgarden music video, By Crooked Steps.

To celebrate his birthday, here we present our Top Ten Foo Fighters Songs.

10. AURORA (There Is Nothing Left To Lose, 1999)
“‘Aurora’ is definitely one of my favourite songs that we’ve ever come up with. Lyrically, it’s just kind of a big question mark, but the words sound good and it’s a nostagic look back at Seattle and the life I once had. That song actually questions the meaning of life, probably. It’s probably the
heaviest thing I’ve ever written.”

9. AIN’T IT THE LIFE (There Is Nothing Left To Lose, 1999)
“That’s what happens when you listen to too much mellow 70’s gold Fleetwood Mac type stuff while recording. Ain’t it the’ life sounds like an Eagles song or something, and I hate The Eagles. It’s about living the quiet, peaceful Virginia life.”

8. TIMES LIKE THESE (One By One, 2002)
“This is sort of a mid-tempo number with a really weird chording that’s kinda reminiscent of Mission Of Burma or Television or kind of a jangly post-punk New York new wave theme guitar line. I think actually that this is the best song I’ve ever written – it’s very emotive and passionate and universal.”

7. NO WAY BACK (In Your Honour, 2005)
“I love that song and the record company wanted it be the first single, but to me it sounded too much like a Foo Fighters song. That song’s kind of our signature sound and I was afraid that if we were to release that
right off the bat then it was too safe and predictable.”
“‘No Way Back’ is another song that I wrote right off the John Kerry campaign trail. It has a lot to do with feeling controlled by a government that you didn’t elect. We got a lot of questions when we first released the
record because everybody thought the title was dedicated to John Kerry, and it was influenced by that, but it wasn’t dedicated to John Kerry. But I kind of denied a lot of the political overtones because I didn’t want to
step on Green Day’s toes or have people think we were a political band and I didn’t want us to turn into Rage Against The Machine. By leaving my perspective out of things it made it so general that other people decide their interpretation.”

6. STRANGER THINGS HAVE HAPPENED (Echoes, Silence, Patience & Grace, 2007)
“I spend a lot of time in silence. I spend a lot of time alone in hotel rooms; I really don’t do a hell of a lot on the road. I’ve been touring for a long time and hotel rooms all begin to look the same after a while. This is
a product of just sitting around and doing fuck all for weeks on end.”

5. HOME (Echoes, Silence, Patience & Grace, 2007)
“I wrote this at home on the piano, then Taylor and I recorded a demo of it. I sat and wrote the lyrics in about 10 minutes, sang it once, listened to it, and just felt overwhelmed by how revealing it was. It made me feel quite vulnerable, so much so that it’s hard to listen to. I get really choked up thinking about all the time I spend away from the things that are important to me. It’s tough being away on tour; it’s even tough
just to be talking about how much I wish I was with my family. It’s the kind of song I can’t imagine singing live because it’s going to be too much.”
4. HEY, JOHNNY PARK (The Colour And The Shape, 1997)
“Oh, my God, that song’s about 15 different things! The only reason why it’s called ‘Hey, Johnny Park!’ is because when I was young, my best friend was this kid who lived across
the street from me called Johnny Park and we were like brothers from the age of 5 to 12. I haven’t heard from him since I was about 14 years old and I thought if I named a song after him he might call.”

3. I SHOULD HAVE KNOWN (Wasting Light, 2011)
“When I first wrote that, I was sitting in my bedroom, and I had someone else in mind when I was singing it. But then as I elaborated on it I thought,there are definitely connections. I’ve definitely felt that way before, especially with Kurt, where, you know, I was afraid this was going to happen. So to have Krist come down and play on that song was kind of a risky move. I explained to him, I said:
“Yeah, you know, it’s one of those songs that I’m sure people are going to think it’s about Kurt.” And he basically said: “Oh, fuck it. That’s okay.”

2. EVERLONG (The Colour And The Shape, 1997)
“The first time I’ve ever played that new wave drum beat and it was fun!”

1. FEBRUARY STARS (The Colour And The Shape, 1997)
“Just a song about hanging on by the tips of your fingers and hoping you don’t slip and fall.”

–words taken from many sources by @agunsux. top ten songs compiled by @unclebowl, words from many sources. image taken from weheartit.com

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