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In honour of what would be George Harrison’s 69th birthday on Saturday, we’ve put together his top ten hits, one’s he penned and sung with The Beatles, and as an accomplished solo musician and songwriter in his own right:

Read more here: http://bit.ly/126nAPu


10I Need You – The Beatles – from Help! It  is the second song written and sung byGeorge Harrison that The Beatles released. It was dedicated to then-girlfriend Pattie Boyd.


9. Don’t Bother Me – The Beatles – from Meet the Beatles! George’s first self-penned song to appear on a Beatles album was written while he was ill on tour:

I was a bit run down and was supposed  to be having some sort of tonic, taking it easy for a few days…I got out my guitar and just played around till a song came. I forgot all about it till we came to record the next LP. It was a fairly crappy song. I forgot about it completely once it was on the album“.


8. What is Life – George Harrison – from his second solo release All Things Must Pass.The song peaked at #10 in 1971, making George the first ex-Beatle to have two Top 10 solo hits on the Billboard chart.


7. While My Guitar Gently Weeps The Beatles – from The White Album. Harrisonwasn’t satisfied with original recordings of the song, so he asked Eric Clapton to record the lead guitar solo in 1968. In his autobiography, Clapton wrote about the experience with George – and the other Beatles:

I was an outsider, but it went well. The song was “While My Guitar Gently Weeps.” We did just one take, and I thought it sounded fantastic. John and Paul were fairly noncommittal, but I knew George was happy because he listened to it over and over in the control room…I felt like I had been brought into their inner sanctum“.


6. All Those Years Ago – George Harrison – from the album Somewhere in England. The death of John Lennon motivated George, Paul and Ringo to collaborate on a tribute to John in 1981:

“…this is a song I wrote to an old friend of ours…whose name is John Lennon“.


5Here Comes the Sun – The Beatles – from the album Abbey RoadThe song is sung by George, a song-writing collaboration between George and close friend Eric Clapton:

Here Comes the Sun” was written at the time when Apple was getting like school, where we had to go and be businessmen: ‘Sign this’ and ‘sign that’. Anyway, it seems as if winter in England goes on forever, by the time spring comes you really deserve it. So one day I decided I was going to sag off Apple and I went over to Eric Clapton’s house. The relief of not having to go see all those dopey accountants was wonderful, and I walked around the garden with one of Eric’s acoustic guitars and wrote “Here Comes the Sun“.


4. Give Me Love, Give Me Peace – George Harrison – from the album Living in the Material World. The song hit #1 in May 1973, knocking “My Love” by McCartney off the top spot on the chart.

With ‘Give Me Love’, again it was a personal thing for me and if anybody else got off on it, well, there it was. But it was awareness of what we need, just give me love, thank you”.


3. Got My Mind Set On You – George Harrison. Two music videos were released for his cover, the first centred around an arcade, the second in a study, with dancing objects – and a backflip!

You know, my humour is such that I have to be able to have something funny happening around me so I can be deadpan, as I’m not really into acting. I think that works very well for me. The director was a guy called Gary Weis, who incidentally directed the Rutles, so he’s a very funny fellow himself. He thought of having a simple setting like that room and making it move so I could just sing straight, play straight andeverything else would be the joke“.


2. Something – The Beatles – from the album Abbey RoadPattie Boyd (George’s girlfriend at the time) claimed in her 2007 autobiography that the song was written about her: “He told me, in a matter-of-fact way, that he had written it for me. I thought it was beautiful“.

But in a 1996 interview, George stated otherwise:

Well no, I didn’t. I just wrote it, and then somebody put together a video. And what they did was they went out and got some footage of me and Patti, Paul and Linda, Ringo and Maureen, it was at that time, and John and Yoko and they just made up a little video to go with it. So then, everybody presumed I wrote it about Patti, but actually, when I wrote it, I was thinking of Ray Charles.”


1. My Sweet Lord – George Harrison – from the album All Things Must Pass. It was the first #1 hit by any ex-Beatle. In an interview in 1980, George talked about the song’s inspiration:

My idea in “My Sweet Lord,” because it sounded like a “pop song,” was to sneak up on them a bit. The point was to have the people not offended by “Hallelujah,” and by the time it gets to “Hare Krishna,” they’re already hooked, and their foot’s tapping, and they’re already singing along “Hallelujah,” to kind of lull them into a sense of false security. And then suddenly it turns into “Hare Krishna,” and they will all be singing that before they know what’s happened, and they will think, “Hey, I thought I wasn’t supposed to like Hare Krishna!” – Interview, 1980

 

In just a few weeks, Baauer’s “Harlem Shake” has ignited an online phenomenon, with groups of people all over the world posting their own version of the 30-second freakout meme. As the “Harlem Shake” mania has reached a fever pitch, the song has debuted at No. 1 on Billboard’s revamped Hot 100 chart, while Baauer, the young EDM whiz behind the track, has become Billboard’s latest cover star.

Read more here: http://bit.ly/YIBQYd

It’s hard to pick just 10 “Harlem Shake” videos in the thousands that already exist, but these are the half-minute snippets that have kept us coming back amidst the explosion. Check out Billboard.com’s 10 favorite “Harlem Shake” videos, and then tell us which one is your personal staple in the comments below.

First up is the one that seemingly started it all: two weeks back, an Australia-based longboarding crew called The Sunny Coast Skate uploaded a clip of four dudes in a dorm-style setting bugging out to Baauer’s beat. It’s since been acknowledged by Youtube as the official kickstarter of the viral trend:


There’s a ton of “office freakout” versions of the meme, but this one, which has amassed 1.4 million YouTube views, has always struck us as the most inspired. Keep shaking that walker, big guy:


Norway might have the world’s most pop culture-savvy battalion — their version was one of the first big spinoffs to hit YouTube (back on Feb. 10) and has since almost twice as many views as the original:


Credit the University of Georgia‘s men’s swim & dive crew for taking this once-underground dance trend… underwater:


Brooklyn indie duo Matt & Kim know how to make a good viral vid (even if it means walking naked through Times Square), so they took time out while playing a gig in Troy, N.Y.’s RPI Fieldhouse to get their audience in on the fun:


Over five million YouTube viewers watched the “Harlem Shake” turn these firefighters into a a raging Spider-Man and, um, chicken-man:


This creative YouTuber took some classic “Peanuts” footage from “A Charlie Brown Christmas” and got the gang doing the dance to Baauer, with Snoopy on guitar, Schroeder on keys, and Pigpen on stand-up bass:


At a Florida Gators-Kentucky Wildcats basketball game, an arena full of Rowdy Reptiles supporters joined the fun, with the Albert the Gator and the cheer crew leading:


NBC’s “The Today Show” did a special Valentine’s Day take on the “Shake” — although their crew might need some more dancing lessons.


Taking the famous Red Bull wings to the next level, this team of skydivers recorded surely the most gravity-defying version of the craze:

By , NY, and , NY for billboard.com

 

Killers Kick Drum
YouTube

Sumner took the stage to play guitar and sing with the Killers. Check out the epic, seven-minute-plus version below.

Watch the Killers Perform ‘Crystal’ With New Order’s Bernard Sumner

 

Bruce Willis: Five Best Moments

From Die Hard to the Whole Nine Yards, we seek out the best on-screen moments from the man who first teamed up ‘yippee-kay-aye’ with an unpublishable obscenity

Bruce Willis

Hard nut … Bruce Willis. Photograph: Jim Spellman/WireImage

An action hero who’s equally at home in comedy roles and straight dramaBruce Willis has been an A-lister for 25 years. While his presence in a film isn’t necessarily always a sign of quality.

Here are five of guardian.co.uk favourite moments from Bruce Willis’s filmography, including recommendations from @guardianfilm. Read more here: http://bit.ly/XfzsKv

1. Pulp Fiction

If you rearranged Pulp Fiction into chronological order, this would be the final scene – Butch and Fabienne riding out of town on Zed’s chopper. Who’s Zed? “Zed’s dead, baby – Zed’s dead.”

Reading on mobile? Watch the clip on YouTube

2. Hudson Hawk

Bruce carries out a fantastically choreographed robbery to the jaunty strains of Swinging On a Star. Fans of his singing might wish to check out his much-derided solo album The Return of Bruno, featuring his cover ofUnder the Boardwalk, a No 2 chart hit in the UK.

Reading on mobile? Watch the clip on YouTube

3. Moonrise Kingdom

The most recent film on our list, last year’s Moonrise Kingdom, featured Bruce in typically authoritative form as, well, a character neatly summed up in this brief scene.

Reading on mobile? Watch the clip on YouTube

4. Beavis and Butt-Head Do America

Bruce plays straight man to Mike Judge‘s sniggering simpletons in one of the stupidest, most childish and most consistently funny animated films of all time.

Reading on mobile? Watch the clip on YouTube

5. The Die Hard films

The most-nominated Bruce Willis moment was him reciting his sweary catchphrase in the Die Hard films. So here it is. It’s probably stating the obvious, but this video might not be for you if you’re offended by bad language.

Reading on mobile? Watch the clip on YouTube

• What would you add to the list?

_adele

The multiplatinum songbird will be performing her hit song “Skyfall” at the Academy Awards next month, the show’s organizers announced Wednesday, eonline.com reported

“Skyfall” single was recorded at Abbey Road Studios in London, where famous albums were previously created by The Beatles and Pink Floyd. It was released on October 5 (Global James Bond day), and it debuted at #8 on the Billboard Hot 100. It is the first Bong song nominated for an Oscar since “For Your Eyes Only” in 1981. The album is also the highest charting since 1985’s A VIEW TO A KILL. It is the second Bond soundtrack in the franchise’s 50-year history to not feature the title track on the album and is solely comprised of the Oscar-nominated score of Thomas Newman.

 

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Lovelace is a 2013 American biographical film about Linda Boreman, better known as Linda Lovelace. It covers the part of her life when she was “20 to 32”. Directed by Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman, written by Andy Bellin and starring Amanda SeyfriedPeter SarsgaardSharon StoneAdam Brody and Juno Temple. It will premiere on January 22, 2013 at the Sundance Film Festival.

image taken from blogs.indiwire.com

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About the Hollywood Foreign Press Association:
Founded in the 1940′s during World War II, the HFPA was originally comprised of a handful of LA based overseas journalists who sought to bridge the international community with Hollywood, and to provide distraction from the hardships of war through film. Sixty-eight years later, members of the HFPA represent 55 countries with a combined readership of 250 million in some of the world’s most respected publications. Each year, the organization holds the third most watched awards show on television, the Golden Globe® Awards, which have enabled the organization to donate more than $12 million to entertainment related charities and scholarship programs. For more information, please visit http://www.goldenglobes.org, and follow us on Twitter (@goldenglobes) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/goldenglobes) for exclusive celebrity videos and up to the minute Golden Globes news!
The final results are known only by the accounting firm and are kept secret until the announcement at the Golden Globe Awards ceremony.

–image from kiss925.com words from goldenglobes.org

 

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As Nell Sweetzer tries to build a new life after the events of the first movie, the evil force that once possessed her returns with an even more horrific plan.

Director:

Ed Gass-Donnelly

 

–image from screencrush.com words from imdb.com

Weezer Live In Jakarta, Jan 8, 2013: Review, Videos & Setlist  _WEEZER-WEB-BANNER

The most anticipated concert of early 2013 has arrived. Weezer was very popular in Indonesia back in mid 90’s. They still are. Weezer was the answer for those not really into heavy metal, grunge, hip-hop and other music genre that was big in the 90’s. Pop music with distortion. Love songs with hair-metal riffs. Power-pop, so they say. Some say nerd-rock. Your call. Weezer was an ok sign. It was ok to be a nerd. It was ok if you have a weird hair-do. It was ok if you have moustache. It was ok if you wear a tie to your office and still listen to rock music. It was ok if you wear Buddy Holly (or Woody Allen?) glasses . . It’s ok if you listen to Weezer. If it’s too loud turn it down.

For South East Asia, they only play Jakarta, Indonesia. And then they head to Australia afterwards. The concept was Greatest Hits + Blue Album (From Start To Finish). Man, how can you can skip this golden moment?

Show started at 8pm. The venue was at Lapangan D Senayan. It’s a football court. It was rainy day. But the rain stopped at noon. Few hours before Weezer performed. But the mud remained. But who cares anyway. It’s Weezer. I didn’t give a damn.

They start the show with “(If You’re Wondering If I Want You Too) I Want You Too,” a song off their 2009 album, Raditude. They played the setlist chronologically backward, so they actually skipped an album, 2010’s Hurley. Then they move forward, er, backward to Red Album (2008) with their hits Troublemaker and Pork And Beans. And then to the year 2005, two songs from Make Believe album with Perfect Situation and Beverly Hills. Then  Green Album (2001) with Island in The Sun and Hash Pipe.

And then we went to the 90’s with their cult album, Pinkerton (1996), with Across The Sea, El Schorcho and Tired of Sex. And they took a break to prepare themselves to perform their full album, the masterpiece, Blue Album. As the recess took place, Karl, the unofficial fifth Weezer member narrated a slideshow on the big screen how Weezer was formed until they gained worldwide popularity with their Blue Album.  As Karl finished his documentary, the band hit the stage again. They played the Blue Album in order. From My Name Is Jonas until Only In Dreams. Magical!

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Setlist:
Greatest Hits : (If You’re Wondering If I Want You To) I Want You To, Pork and Beans, Troublemaker, Perfect Situation, Beverly Hills, Dope Nose (Scott Vocals), Island In The Sun (with intro partial cover of AKB’s Heavy Rotation), Hash Pipe, Across The Sea, El Schorcho, Tired of Sex. Blue Album: My Name Is Jonas, No One Else, Buddy Holly, Come Undone – The Sweater Song, Surf Wax America, Say It Ain’t So, In The Garage, Holiday, Only in Dreams. 

– assembled by @agunsux and @yonan32, image from gigsplay.com, videos uploaded by: @fetboyslim, @linggaresineta, @upiel, @entulista

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Paste’s Best of 2012 series continues through Dec. 31 and is made possible by our friends at Tretorn.

When all your favorite bands are on Twitter and Instagram, it can seem like you’ve got the inside scoop on all that goes on off stage. But there’s nothing like a well-crafted documentary to see what went into the music you love so dearly. This year saw directors like Spike Lee, Jonathan Demme and Kevin Macdonald filming some iconic music legends. But it also showed that little-known filmmakers documenting smaller acts can create just as a powerful a story. Here are the 10 Best Music Documentaries of 2012.

10. How to Grow a Band
Director: Mark Meatto
A good film—and a good band, for that matter—can be much like The Wizard of Oz. If everything goes just right, if the curtain doesn’t get pulled back, then the audience can find itself part of a great and powerful experience. But with How To Grow A Band, director Mark Meatto proves that, sometimes, a look behind the curtain can yield just as amazing of an experience. Meatto followed the folk-formal-fusion-but-don’t-you-dare-call-it-bluegrass band Punch Brothers for two years: on tour, in studio, on the street, in the living room, in comfort and in flux. The portrait of the band that emerges is clear and precise. We come to know the band so well that the music is comfortingly familiar by film’s end; we come to the know the band members so well that we can hear each individual personality filter through each song. And that’s what How To Grow A Band is really about. Meatto shows us how five virtuosos come together to take traditional music in a new direction.—Joan Radell

9. Bad25
Director: Spike Lee
Airing on ABC on Thanksgiving Day, Spike Lee delved deep into Michael Jackson’s Bad—both the album and the tour—a quarter century after its release. With no more records to break after Thriller, Jackson poured the pressure on himself, pushing himself and everyone around him to take things even bigger. With current interviews with folks like Quincy Jones and Martin Scorsese (who directed the BAD short film) and historical interviews with Jackson, Bad25 captures the moment in pop history. But it’s the candid moments that are most special. While the TV version was just over an hour, you can see the full 123-minute documentary coming to DVD in February, including a clip of Jackson dancing with Sheryl Crow, a section on his purchase of the Beatles’ catalog and interviews with Stevie Wonder and the Biebs.

8. Carol Channing: Larger Than Life
Director: Dori Berinstein
Carol Channing is such an endearing, sharp, funny personality that director Dori Berinstein could easily have just thrown her camera on a tripod, have the 90-year-old musical theater legend spin anecdotes for an hour and a half, and had a great documentary. Thankfully, what she made is even better. Sure, Channing still tells those stories about her life and stage career in her paradoxically inimitable-yet-oft-imitated style. But there are also heartfelt testimonies from fellow actors and personalities, most legends in their own right, about how talented and genuine she is. Carol Channing: Larger than Life is like a warm cinematic hug from Shubert Alley, not to be missed by anyone with even the remotest passing interest in Channing or Broadway history.—Dan Kaufman

7. Crossfire Hurricane
Director: Brett Morgan
Oscar-nominated documentarian Brett Morgan (On the Ropes) interviewed The Rolling Stones on the eve of the band’s 50th anniversary. “No cameras were allowed in the room,” he lets us know at the beginning of Crossfire Hurricane. But immediately we’re taken back to one of the band’s earliest tours of America, where they reigned as the bad boys to The Beatles’ cleaner image. With tons of concert clips, interview footage and backstage moments—much of which was previously unreleased—it’s an entertaining story about natural entertainers. Courtney Love liked it enough to invite Morgan to helm the upcoming Kurt Cobain documentary.

6. Neil Young: Journeys
Director: Jonathan Demme
Neil Young Journeys is director Jonathan Demme’s documentary of the last two nights of Young’s solo world tour performing at Toronto’s Massey Hall. The uncut performances, almost entirely from his 2010 album Le Noise, are interspersed with footage of Young driving around his hometown of Omemee, Ontario, in a 1956 Crown Victoria. In the car, he tells stories about his childhood, showing Demme the places where he grew up, almost all of which have been completely destroyed. Demme’s third documentary about Young assumes that his audience has a deep biographical knowledge of Young, but it’s enchanting to watch. There’s a reason he has had such a long and successful career as a musician and performer: watching him is enthralling and, at times, chill-inducing. The film offers a rare chance to experience an incredibly intimate performance from a rock-and-roll icon.—Emily Kirkpatrick

When all your favorite bands are on Twitter and Instagram, it can seem like you’ve got the inside scoop on all that goes on off stage. But there’s nothing like a well-crafted documentary to see what went into the music you love so dearly. This year saw directors like Spike Lee, Jonathan Demme and Kevin Macdonald filming some iconic music legends. But it also showed that little-known filmmakers documenting smaller acts can create just as a powerful a story. Here are the 10 Best Music Documentaries of 2012.

5. Big Easy Express
Director: Emmett Malloy
What happens when you have all the members of Mumford & Sons, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros and Old Crow Medicine Show on an old, historic train traveling 2,800 miles throughout the American Southwest playing shows in the unlikeliest of places? Lots of jamming, a set with a high-school band and a hell of a lot of fun. If you have any interest in the Americana/folk-pop movement, Big Easy Express will give you a glimpse into its motivation, showing even those now-enormous pop stars in Mumford playing around in their roots.

4. Under African Skies
Director: Joe Berlinger
Joe Berlinger’s fascinating, immersive documentary Under African Skies celebrates the 25th anniversary of Paul Simon’s landmark Graceland album and examines the firestorm of controversy that it ignited.The narrative core of the film is Simon’s 2011 return to South Africa to stage a reunion concert and, most poignantly, a conversation between him and Dali Tambo about their opposing stances 25 years ago and where they find themselves today. To his credit, Berlinger presents all arguments impartially and leaves the viewer to come to his or her own terms with Simon’s motives and actions.—Clay Steakley

3. Marley
Director: Kevin Macdonald
It’s not entirely clear why director Kevin Macdonald decided to make a documentary about the musician Bob Marley, a cultural icon whose life has been recounted countless times through a variety of mediums. Macdonald claims it’s because he wants to understand why Marley continues to speak to legions of fans around the world. Whatever his reasons, he’s clearly up to the task. Marley offers an expansive and at times fascinating perspective on the man through interviews with his fellow former Wailers, family, and childhood friends. The film is fairly detailed concerning Marley’s songwriting and musicianship from his early ska days up through the release of Catch a Fire. After this, however, it skips through his catalogue, choosing to focus more on his personal life, conversion to Rastafarianism, the tumultuous state of Jamaican politics, and his prolific womanizing—all of which are important elements of the artist’s character.—Jonah Flicker

2. Searching for Sugar Man
Director: Malik Bendjelloul
“The Story of the Forgotten Genius” is such a well-worn formula for music documentaries that it was already being parodied more than three decades ago in This is Spinal Tap. In Searching for Sugar Man, as Swedish director Malik Bendjelloul begins to tell the story of Rodriguez—the Dylanesque folk rocker who released two apparently brilliant albums in the early 1970s, then disappeared—it appears he’s traveling a familiar road. But that road takes a sharp left turn when we learn that bootleg recordings catapulted Rodriguez to stratospheric heights of fame in apartheid-era South Africa. (When a record-store owner is asked if Rodriguez was as big as the Rolling Stones, he matter-of-factly replies “Oh, much bigger than that.”). In fact, his uncensored depictions of sex and drugs were so thrilling to South African musicians that he became the patron saint of the Afrikaner punk movement, which in turn laid the groundwork for the organized anti-apartheid movement that eventually brought the regime down. It’s just a shame that Rodriguez never lived to see it—he burned himself to death onstage in the middle of a show. Or overdosed in prison. Or shot himself alone in his apartment. Or… could he still be alive? Bendjelloul’s film manages to create an aura of mystery and suspense around a search that actually unfolded 14 years ago—a “detective documentary” set in the very recent past.—Michael Dunaway

1. Shut Up and Play the Hits
Directors: Will Lovelace and Dylan Southern
A year ago, hundreds of friends and thousands of fans converged on Madison Square Garden for LCDSoundsystem’s farewell performance. All the while, the cameras were rolling, resulting in Shut Up And Play the Hits, a documentary that follows James Murphy and the band in the days leading up to, during and after the tumultuous four-hour farewell. Directors Will Lovelace and Dylan Southern use a staggering number of cameras and crosscut liberally to provide an experience that’s arguably even better than seeing the band live (okay, maybe not quite that good but…). And the scenes outside the concert footage are equally compelling. —Michael Dunaway/Bo Moore

— articles by josh jackson for paste magazine. image from uncut.co.uk
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