Tag Archive: Hobbit


After about six months of buzz, noise, gripes, campaigning, smearing and whatnot, the 85th Academy Awards are finally here. It’s been a long and eventful season and one of the most interesting in recent years if only because the winners weren’t locked up in advance like “The Artist” last year. In fact, it’s been one of the most up and down, surprising seasons in an age. “Argo” took the buzz early on in Telluride, “Silver Linings Playbook” took the baton after that in Toronto when it won the coveted Audience Award and then “Zero Dark Thirty,” “Lincoln” and “Life of Pi” entered the fray later in the fall and changed everything (remember when everyone thought “Les Misérables” would be the frontrunner after those reports of audiences crying and cheering?). But the “Argo” groundswell started to mount late in the game after director Ben Affleck was snubbed by the Academy during the nominations and the ground started moving under everyone’s feet again.

Read more about Oscars here: http://bit.ly/YqxuoM

Best Picture
“Amour”
WINNER: “Argo”
“Beasts Of The Southern Wild”
“Django Unchained”
“Les Misérables”
“Life Of Pi”
“Lincoln”
“Silver Linings Playbook”
“Zero Dark Thirty”

Best Director
Michael Haneke – “Amour”
Benh Zeitlin – “Beasts Of The Southern Wild”
WINNER: Ang Lee – “Life Of Pi”
Steven Spielberg – “Lincoln”
David O. Russell – “Silver Linings Playbook”

Best Actor In A Leading Role
Denzel Washington – “Flight”
Hugh Jackman – “Les Misérables”
Daniel Day-Lewis – “Lincoln”
Joaquin Phoenix – “The Master”
Bradley Cooper – “Silver Linings Playbook”

Best Actress In A Leading Role
Emmanuelle Riva – “Amour”
Quvenzhane Wallis – “Beasts Of The Southern Wild”
Naomi Watts – “The Impossible”
Jennifer Lawrence – “Silver Linings Playbook”
Jessica Chastain – “Zero Dark Thirty”

Best Actor In A Supporting Role
WINNER: Christoph Waltz – “Django Unchained”
Robert De Niro – “Silver Linings Playbook”
Alan Arkin – “Argo”
Tommy Lee Jones – “Lincoln”
Philip Seymour Hoffman – “The Master”

Best Actress In A Supporting Role
WINNER: Anne Hathaway – “Les Misérables”
Sally Field – “Lincoln”
Amy Adams “The Master”
Helen Hunt – “The Sessions”
Jacki Weaver – “Silver Linings Playbook”

Best Original Screenplay
Michael Haneke – “Amour”
WINNER: Quentin Tarantino – “Django Unchained”
John Gatins – “Flight”
Wes Anderson & Roman Coppola – “Moonrise Kingdom”
Mark Boal – “Zero Dark Thirty”

Best Adapted Screenplay
WINNER: Chris Terrio – “Argo”
Lucy Alibar, Benh Zeitlin – “Beasts of the Southern Wild”
David Magee – “Life of Pi”
Tony Kushner – “Lincoln”
David O. Russell – “Silver Linings Playbook”

Best Foreign Language Film
WINNER: “Amour”
“Kon-Tiki”
“No”
“A Royal Affair”
“War Witch”

Best Animated Feature Film
WINNER: “Brave”
“Frankenweenie”
ParaNorman
“The Pirates! Band of Misfits”
“Wreck-It Ralph”

Best Original Song
“Before My Time” – “Chasing Ice”
“Pi’s Lullaby” – “Life of Pi”
“Suddenly” – “Les Miserables
“Skyfall” – “Skyfall”
“Everybody Needs a Best Friend” – “Ted”

Best Cinematography
WINNER: Claudio Miranda – “Life of Pi”
Seamus McGarvey – “Anna Karenina”
Robert Richardson – “Django Unchained”
Janusz Kaminski – “Lincoln”
Roger Deakins – “Skyfall”

Best Film Editing
WINNER: William Goldenberg – “Argo”
Tim Squyres – “Life of Pi”
Michael Kahn – Lincoln
Jay Cassidy and Crispin Struthers – “Silver Linings Playbook”
William Goldenberg, Dylan Tichenor – Zero Dark Thirty

Best Costume Design
WINNER: Jacqueline Durran – “Anna Karenina”
Paco Delgado – “Les Misérables”
Joanna Johnston – “Lincoln”
Eiko Ishioka – “Mirror Mirror”
Colleen Atwood – “Snow White and the Huntsman

Best Documentary Feature
WINNER: “Searching For Sugar Man”
“5 Broken Cameras”
“The Gatekeepers”
“How To Survive A Plague”
“The Invisible War”

Best Visual Effects
WINNER: “Life of Pi”
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey
“Marvel’s The Avengers”
“Prometheus”
“Snow White and the Huntsman”

Best Production Design
WINNER:Rick Carter, Jim Erickson, Peter T Frank – “Lincoln”
Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer – “Anna Karenina”
Dan Hennah, Ra Vincent, Simon Bright – “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey”
Eve Stewart – “Les Misérables”
David Gropman, Anna Pinnock – “Life of Pi”

Best Original Score
WINNER: Mychael Danna – “Life of Pi”
Dario Marianelli – “Anna Karenina”
Alexandre Desplat – “Argo”
John Williams – “Lincoln”
Thomas Newman – “Skyfall”

Best Make Up
WINNER: “Les Misérables”
“Hitchcock”
“The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey”

Best Sound Editing
WINNER: (TIE) “Skyfall” and “Zero Dark Thirty”
“Argo”
“Django Unchained”
“Life of Pi”

Best Sound Mixing
WINNER: “Les Misérables”
“Argo”
“Life of Pi”
“Lincoln”
“Skyfall

Best Documentary Short Film
WINNER: “Inocente”
“Kings Point”
“Mondays At Racine”
“Open Heart”
“Redemption”

Best Animated Short
WINNER: “Paperman”
“Adam and Dog”
“Fresh Guacamole”
“Head Over Heels”
“Maggie Simpson In the Longest Daycare”

Best Live-Action Short Film
WINNER: “Curfew”
“Asad”
“Buzkashi Boys”
“Death of a Shadow”
“Henry”

There are essentially four possible narratives that could unfold.
1) “Argo” continues its general awards sweep.
2) The Weinsteins‘ campaigning pays off in spades, and “Silver Linings Playbook” sweeps.
3) “Lincoln” takes Best Picture, Director and Actor, being deemed the most “important” of the nominees.
4) Everyone’s been underestimating “Life Of Pi,” and it surprises with the top prize.
Winners prediction are in bold. Read more here: http://bit.ly/XBMroJ
1. “Inocente” 2. “Mondays At Racine” 3. “Open Heart” 4. “Redemption” 5. “Kings Point”
1. “Curfew” 2. “Death Of A Shadow’ 3. “Asad” 4. “Buzkashi Boys” 5. “Henry”
 
1. “Paperman 2. “Adam And Dog” 3. “Head Over Heels” 4. “Fresh Guacamole” 5. “The Longest Daycare”
1. “Skyfall” 2. “Life Of Pi” 3. “Argo” 4. “Zero Dark Thirty” 5. “Django Unchained
1. “Les Miserables 2. “Skyfall” 3. “Argo” 4. “Life Of PI” 5. “Lincoln”

Best Make-Up and Hairstyling

1. “Les Miserables”
3. “Hitchcock”
Best Visual Effects
1. “Life Of Pi”
2. “Marvel’s The Avengers”
3. “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey”
4. “Promethus”
5. “Snow White and the Hunstman”
1. “Skyfall” from “Skyfall” – Adele Adkins and Paul Epworth
2. “Suddenly” from “Les Miserables” – Claude-Michel Schonberg, Herbert Kretzmer and Alain Boubil
3. “Before My Time” from “Chasing Ice” – J. Ralph 4. “Everybody Needs A Best Friend” from “Ted” – Walter Murphy and Seth MacFarlane 5. “Pi’s Lullaby” from “Life of Pi” – Mychael Danna and Bombay Jayashri
Best Original Score
1. “Life of Pi” – Mychael Danna
2. “Skyfall” – Thomas Newman
3. “Argo”  – Alexandre Desplat
4. “Lincoln” – John Williams
5. “Anna Karenina” – Dario Marianelli
Best Production Design

1. “Anna Karenina” – Sarah Greenwood and Katie Spencer
2. “Life Of Pi” – David Gropman and Anna Pinnock
3. “The Hobbit; An Unexpected Journey” – Dan Hennah, Ra Vincent, Simon Bright
4. “Les Miserables” – Eve Stewart and Anna Lynch-Robinson
5. “Lincoln” – Rick Carter, Jim Erickson

Best Costume Design

1. “Anna Karenina” – Jacqueline Durran
2. “Mirror Mirror” – Eiko Ishioka
3. “Snow White and the Huntsman” – Colleen Atwood
4. “Lincoln” – Joanna Johnston
5. “Les Miserables” – Paco Delgado

Best Film Editing

1. “Argo” – William Goldenberg
2. “Zero Dark Thirty” – Dylan Tichenor and William Goldenberg
3. “Life Of Pi” – Tim Squyres
4. “Lincoln” – Michael Kahn
5. “Silver Linings Playbook” – Jay Cassidy and Crispin Struthers

Best Cinematography

1. “Life Of Pi” – Claudio Miranda
2. “Skyfall” – Roger Deakins
3. “Anna Karenina” – Seamus McGarvey
4. “Lincoln” – Janusz Kaminski
5. “Django Unchained” – Robert Richardson

Best Animated Feature

1. “Brave”
2. “Frankenweenie”
3. “Wreck-It Ralph”
4. “ParaNorman
5. “The Pirates! Band Of Misfits”

Best Documentary – Feature

1. “Searching For Sugar Man”
2. “The Gatekeepers”
3. “How To Survive A Plague”
4. “5 Broken Cameras”
5. “The Invisible War”

Best Foreign Language Film

1. “Kon-Tiki”
2. “Amour”
3. “A Royal Affair”
4. “No”
5. “War Witch”

Best Writing – Adapted Screenplay
1. “Argo” – Chris Terrio
2. “Silver Linings Playbook” – David O. Russell
3. “Lincoln” – Tony Kushner
4. “Life Of Pi” – David Magee
5. “Beasts of the Southern Wild” – Lucy Alibar & Benh Zeitlin
Best Writing – Original Screenplay
1. “Zero Dark Thirty” – Mark Boal
2. “Django Unchained” – Quentin Tarantino
3. “Amour” – Michael Haneke
4. “Moonrise Kingdom” – Wes Anderson and Roman Coppola
5. “Flight” – John Gatins
Best Supporting Actor
1. Robert De Niro – “Silver Linings Playbook”
2. Christoph Waltz – “Django Unchained”
3. Tommy Lee Jones – “Lincoln”
4. Philip Seymour Hoffman – “The Master”
5. Alan Arkin – “Argo”
Best Supporting Actress
1. Anne Hathaway – “Les Miserables”
2. Sally Field – “Lincoln”
3. Amy Adams – “The Master”
4. Helen Hunt – “The Sessions”
5. Jacki Weaver – “Silver Linings Playbook”
Best Actor
1. Daniel Day-Lewis – “Lincoln”
2. Joaquin Phoenix – “The Master”
3. Hugh Jackman – “Les Miserables”
4. Bradley Cooper – “Silver Linings Playbook”
5. Denzel Washington – “Flight”
Best Actress 
1. Emmanuelle Riva – “Amour”
2. Jennifer Lawrence – “Silver Linings Playbook”
3. Jessica Chastain – “Zero Dark Thirty”
4. Naomi Watts – “The Impossible”
5. Quvenzhane Wallis – “Beasts of the Southern Wild”
Best Director
1. Ang Lee – “Life Of Pi”
2. Steven Spielberg – “Lincoln”
3. Michael Haneke – “Amour”
4. David O Russell – “Silver Linings Playbook”
5. Benh Zeitlin – “Beasts of the Southern Wild”
Best Picture
1. “Argo”
2. “Silver Linings Playbook”
3. “Life Of Pi”
4 “Lincoln”
5. “Zero Dark Thirty”
6. “Amour”
7. “Les Miserables”
8. “Django Unchained”
9. “Beasts of the Southern Wild”

 

 

 

Peter Jackson’s film snagged nine noms, while “Life of Pi” and “Skyfall” received eight and seven respectively.

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey
The “Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey”

Warner Bros./New Line’s The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey topped the Saturn Award nominations, nabbing nine of the precious slots for recognition given out by the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films.

Fox’s Life of Pi and Sony/MGM’s Skyfall were also leading contenders, with eight and seven respectively.

On the TV side, Fox TV‘s Fringe led the nominations with six, elbowing out Showtime’s Dexter, which nabbed five. Also receiving Saturn love were AMC’s Breaking Bad, TNT’sFalling SkiesLeverage, NBC’s Revolution and AMC’s The Walking Dead.

The Saturns give props to so-called “genre” movies, which encompass sci-fi, fantasy, comic book adaptations and horror films. In the Hollywood of yore, the movies were given second class status, but now the geekified pop culture of the 21st century are the films that often receive the most lavish of attention.

But interestingly, this year saw the Saturns stretch the definition of genre to encompass prestige films of not only just Pi, but also awards season favorites such as Argo and Les Miserables.

“From the grand adventure of Les Miserables to the visionary fantasy of Life of Pi and the magical realism of Beasts of the Southern Wild, this year’s films transcended the notion of genre filmmaking and brought us extraordinary visions of exaggerated or enhanced reality, making this one of the most intriguing list of Saturn Awards nominees in a long time,” said Academy president Robert Holguin.

The nominations for best science fiction films included Marvel’s The Avengers, Fox’s Chronicle, Warners’ Cloud Altas, Lionsgate’s The Hunger Games, Sony’s Looper and Fox’s Prometheus.

The best fantasy category included Sony’s The Amazing Spider-ManThe HobbitPiSnow White and the Huntsman, and category-stretching Ruby Sparks, from Fox Searchlight, and Universal’s Ted.

Read more nominees here: http://bit.ly/VHikiA

The Saturns are awarded in 20 film categories, nine TV categories and four in home entertainment.

 

Box Office Results: The Hobbit Sets New December Opening Weekend Record

the hobbit

The ComingSoon.net Box Office Report has been updated with studio estimates for the weekend. Clickhere for the full box office estimates of the top 12 films and then check back on Monday for the final figures based on actual box office.

New Line Cinema and MGM’s The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey kicked off the holiday season with an estimated $84.8 million, a new December opening weekend record, surpassing the $77.2 million earned by Will Smith-starrer I Am Legend the same weekend in 2007. The Peter Jackson film debuted in 4,045 theaters in which it averaged a strong $20,958 per location.

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey received an A CinemaScore from moviegoers which should help with word-of-mouth through the holidays. 58% of the audience was over the ages of 25 and males made up 57% of the audience.

$10.1 million of the domestic total came from the 326 IMAX theaters the film opened in this weekend. That’s an average of $31,000 per screen. Internationally, the picture broke an IMAX December record grossing $5 million in 126 IMAX locations (an average of $40,000). The IMAX locations which showed the film in 48 fps were quite strong, generating $44,000 per screen domestically and $57,000 per screen internationally. IMAX’s global weekend total for “The Hobbit” is an estimated $15+ million, which is a record for December.

In North America, DreamWorks Animation’s Rise of the Guardians remained in second place with $7.4 million for a four-week total of $71.4 million. The animated family adventure cost about $145 million to make.

DreamWorks Pictures‘ Lincoln climbed a spot to third with $7.2 million. The $65 million Steven Spielberg film has earned $107.9 million after six weeks in theaters.

Dropping from first place to fourth, Sony and MGM’s Skyfall added $7 million domestically for a total of $272.4 million after six weeks. Internationally, the 23rd James Bond film grossed an estimated $12.2 million this weekend, bringing the overseas total to $678.7 million. Worldwide, the film has earned $951 million to date.

Ang Lee’s Life of Pi rounded out the top five with $5.4 million its fourth weekend. The Twentieth Century Fox Film release has collected $69.6 million after four weeks.

Also, Summit’s The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 2 earned $45.2 million its fifth weekend for a domestic total of $276.9 million.

Weekend Box Office

December 14, 2012 – December 16, 2012 

TW LW Title Studio Weekend Theaters Total Week
1 The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey New Line Cinema (Warner Bros. Pictures)
$84,775,000
4,045
$84,775,000
1
2 2 Rise of the Guardians DreamWorks Animation
$7,420,000
3,387
$71,362,000
4
3 4 Lincoln DreamWorks Pictures
$7,244,000
2,285
$107,898,000
6
4 1 Skyfall Columbia Pictures (Sony), MGM
$7,000,000
2,924
$272,366,000
6
5 5 Life of Pi 20th Century Fox
$5,400,000
2,548
$69,559,000
4
6 3 The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 2 Summit Entertainment
$5,175,000
3,042
$276,865,000
5
7 7 Wreck-It Ralph Walt Disney Pictures
$3,273,000
2,249
$168,779,000
7
8 6 Playing for Keeps FilmDistrict
$3,247,000
2,840
$10,838,000
2
9 8 Red Dawn FilmDistrict
$2,394,000
2,250
$40,889,000
4
10 11 Silver Linings Playbook The Weinstein Company
$2,084,000
371
$16,954,000
5
11 9 Flight Paramount Pictures
$1,940,000
1,823
$89,448,000
7
12 Argo Warner Bros. Pictures
$1,145,000
667
$104,930,000
10

 

Source: comingsoon.net

 

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey’ 48 FPS 3D – Good or Bad?

The-Hobbit-Unexpected-Journey-HFR-Poster

Most critics have weighed in with their thoughts about director Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (read our review), with the reactions varying accordingly. However, the most commonly-derided aspect is the film’s appearance when projected in its native format: 48 frames per second (fps) 3D, which is twice the standard for theater showings. The issue has hounded An Unexpected Journeysince Jackson premiered footage in 48 fps at CinemaCon 2012; lately, he seems to be spending more time discussing the format (or, rather, defending it) than other film elements, thematic and technical alike.

Warner Bros. is noticeably concerned about blowback, as evidenced by the limited rollout and lack of surcharge for 48 fps Hobbit screenings. Jackson is ready to embrace it as a new storytelling tool but for studios, the jury’s still out on whether 48 fps is the next ‘big thing’ (see: 3D and/or IMAX) or the latest in a line of failed attempts to shake up the viewing experience (Smell-o-vision, anyone?) – and by that we mean, something that audiences will pay for.

What the higher frame-rate does is remove that thin layer of graininess that allows viewers to distinguish between images projected on a theater screen (something artificial) and their surroundings in the real world, purely on the basis of sight. This results in camera and actors’ movements onscreen appearing faster than normal; not to mention, it makes it all the more obvious when practical effects (be it sets, props, makeup or costumes) and CGI have been manufactured on the cheap.

HD televisions and Blu-rays have a similar impact, revealing the imperfections and flaws in older titles (and newer ones, at that) which were previously masked by the haziness afforded from lower frame-rate projections. Similarly, motion onscreen in general is often perceived as sped-up and therefore blurrier, simply because so many longtime viewers are accustomed to the ‘slowdown’ effect of the traditional 24 frame-rate screening (going back to the early 20th century, that is).

the hobbit-unexpected-journey-reviews

An Unexpected Journey, by comparison, doesn’t suffer so much from those issuesbecause Jackson and his collaborators took added transparency into consideration while shooting at 48 fps; hence, viewers are actually meant to be able to see the finer details. As a result, the fine craftsmanship of film artists who work with their hands, basic machinery or state-of-the-art computers is easier to appreciate; not to mention, scenes where human and CGI players interact seem more believable (as both now look equally “real”).

Of course, this presents a philosophical dilemma: Should these things look “real?” Middle-earth, as presented in The Hobbit, is the sort of fairytale kingdom that one might conjure up from their imagination (as J.R.R. Tolkien did so many years ago). When you reduce artificiality and instill a heightened sense of realism, it dwindles the sensation of peering into a dreamworld; worse, it leaves some people with the same (bad) impression as a low-budget recording of a stage performance. That’s why some have dismissed Jackson’s Hobbit ’experiment’ as misguided at best, a gimmick with little artistic merit at worst.

the hobbit bilbo-rivendell-hobbit-trailer-570x244

Andrew Lesnie’s cinematography throughout An Unexpected Journey uses 3D to its advantage, combing subtle (but constant) camera motion with sweeping crane and aerial shots to generate an immersive visual design. Moreover, when viewed with the 48 fps format, the grandiose shots of environments both real (the New Zealand landscape) and fake (tunnels and mines in the Lonely Mountain) end up bearing a stronger resemblance to a model; that holds true for the individuals that populate them, be they computer-generated or genuine.

Again, this quality can be a distraction and jarring for those not prepared. However, it (arguably) allows cinematic visuals to better imitate what the real world looks like to the human eye, when perceived from either a great height or up close. This also makes the 3D viewing experience smoother and less cumbersome (ie. higher fps = fewer headaches). Moreover, it seems to reduce the frequency of 3D images that take on a pop-up book appearance and benefits certain camera techniques (like changing the depth of field). Indeed, that makes 3D and 48 fps a natural fit.

The-Hobbit-Third-Film-New-Title-and-Release-Date

Jackson’s intention with these technical choices is quite apparent: the more real various components of Middle-earth look, the more moviegoers will feel as though they’ve been transported there (in theory). It’s not meant to distract from key storytelling elements (narrative structure, pacing); rather, it’s meant to enhance. Whether or not it inadvertently ends up serving the former rather that latter and intended purpose, is the basis for continuing debates about the subject.

Interestingly enough, the 48 fps format might be best-suited for films that aren’t reliant on heavy amounts of digital shots or big-budget panache; that is, smaller projects aiming for something closer to cinéma vérité would benefit more from the crystal-clear visual presentation. On the other hand (as mentioned before), that format does reduce physical stress from 3D viewing and helps to seamlessly blend practical/CGI components. Its storytelling value is flexible, depending on what the director is going for (similar to the partial use of IMAX in such films as The Dark Knight Rises).

the hobbit

Jackson perhaps put it best himself when he clarified that increased frame-rate projection is not meant to be an industry game-changer (a la color, sound, 3D). To quote:

“The big thing to realize is that it’s not an attempt to change the film industry. It’s another choice. The projectors that can run at 48 frames can run at 24 frames – it doesn’t have to be one thing or another. You can shoot a movie at 24 frames and have sequences at 48 or 60 frames within the body of the film. You can still do all the shutter-angle and strobing effects. It doesn’t necessarily change how films are going to be made. It’s just another choice that filmmakers have got and for me, it gives that sense of reality that I love in cinema.”

(reviewed by sandy schaefer. images taken from screenrant.com)

 

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