Tag Archive: Google


How to Use Twitter #Music

Twitter's new music app / Twitpic

Twitter‘s new music app / Twitpic

The micro-news behemoth has jumped into the music game. So, what’s in it for you?

Today, Twitter finally rolled out its new music app, which is called Twitter #music. The company’s ambitions are predictably grand, calling the app “a new service that will change the way people find music, based on Twitter.” As a streaming songs and discovery service, they are entering a crowded and growing field, one that leaves users with various similar options. Let’s try and figure out how Twitter #music differentiates itself.

How does Twitter #music work?

Twitter #music has five tabs for exploration: “Popular,” which collects music that is trending on Twitter; “Emerging,” which promises “hidden talent found in the tweets”; “Suggested,” which uses an algorithm to offer music it thinks you might be into; “#NowPlaying,” which displays music currently tweeted by people you follow, using that hashtag; and “Me,” which simply displays music by artists you follow. Clicking on a tile will play an artist’s song, and offer you more music to listen to, either by that specific artist or other similar artists.

Where can I get Twitter #music?

Twitter music is currently available on iPhones via the App Store, and mobile is where Twitter is really hoping their music service explodes. But there is also a web-based app, available atmusic.twitter.com. Twitter says that an Android app will be rolled out soon.

How is Twitter #music different than something like Spotify?

Twitter is smartly trying to put the information it collects from its massive database of 200 million users to work, and for that reason Twitter #music is more discovery-based than Spotify or Rdio. Twitter wants you to click around its app and discover new artists and songs — be it a song so popular you feel stupid for not knowing it, or an artist you’ve never heard of — which will allow it to hone its suggestions to you and users like you. It wants you to get lost in the app even if you weren’t searching for anything specific.

Is Twitter #music in competition with other services?

Listen to new song from Black Sabbath here: http://go.spin.com/10lLOF8

Not yet, at least. Twitter #music plays previews of songs via iTunes as its default setting, but Spotify or Rdio users can link with Twitter #music to hear full tracks through those services in the Twitter #music app.

Will Twitter #music actually help me discover new music?

That depends. It’s a service that is primarily geared to the casual listener, so music nerds may find less worth in it. It suggests artists like Fabolous, 2 Chainz, Meek Mill — major rap stars who have likely been heard by anyone with an interest in rap music — but also artists like Kilo Kish, Kano, and Little Dragon, who are not exactly underground, but at least a bit more unknown. Absolutely voracious music fans will probably still find themselves plumbing the depths of something like Spotify.

Which of Twitter #music’s features holds the most potential?

Either the “Suggested” or “Emerging” tabs, which do the most to expose users to artists or songs they may not have heard. Both have their biases — “Suggested” could go much deeper than it does, while “Emerging” currently offers mostly white people with guitars, even ones like the Appleseed Cast and the Pastels, who have long since “emerged” from wherever they came.

What’s wrong with the other features?

Well, the “Popular” tab barely varies from something like the popular charts on iTunes or Spotify, though acts such as Azealia Banks, Robin Thicke, and Little Mix manage to slip in amongst the usual suspects Pitbull and Taylor Swift. Otherwise, Twitter #music is highly dependent on active engagement with musicians on Twitter by you and the people you follow. If you only follow 20 musicians on Twitter or don’t have friends that actively tweet about what they’re listening to, the “#NowPlaying” and “Me” tabs will be very limited.

If I follow a musician on Twitter, why do I need an app to discover their music?

This is probably the most obvious piece of evidence that reveals Twitter #music as an app for Twitter users that aren’t voracious music listeners. If you follow a musician on Twitter and keep up with their work, or are aware of artists similar to those you follow on Twitter, than the app will hold less appeal to you than to others.

Does Twitter #music have potential?

Sure. If musicians begin to release music consistently via tweets, the “Me” tab could become a useful clearinghouse for new music you want to check for. The “Popular” tab also does attempt to quantify exactly which artists are the most popular on Twitter, which beforehand was a process that was decidedly more arduous. Also, as more people use Twitter #music, the app’s algorithms will improve.

written by Jordan Sargent. 

 

Justin Timberlake Proves Streaming Isn't A Death Sentence For Music Sales

Do music subscription services threaten music sales? Not if you ask Justin Timberlake.

John Paul Titlow for readwrite.com wrote that the rise of all-you-can-stream services like Spotify have made some artists nervous about the model’s potential impact on music sales. It’s why bands like Coldplay have delayed the arrival of new albums on Spotify and others, like the Beatles and AC/DC, are holding out all together. Logically, it makes sense: If you make your music available to stream for free, people are less likely to buy it.

Right? Not always. Read more here: http://bit.ly/11gJpZA

Ahead of its release on March 19, Justin Timberlake’s new albumThe 20/20 Experience was streaming in its entirety not just on Spotify and Rdio, but at the iTunes store itself. Anybody who wanted to could quickly and legally access the album for a week. Then it was released. And it became the most pre-ordered album in iTunes history, surging past his record label’s sales expectations by 63%.

It’s good news not just for Timberlake himself, but for the music subscription model that he plans to embrace when MySpace — of which he is part owner — launches its own service later this year.  MySpace will join GoogleAmazon, Beats and God knows who else in entering the digital music subscription market in 2013.

Timberlake’s experience would seem to debunk the thesis that streaming can’t support artists and thus isn’t in their best interests. Indeed, his success will likely make him a poster child for the music subscription revolution as the industry marches toward a future in which music is rented more than it’s owned.

But hold on a second. For one thing, we’re not all Justin Timberlake. The pop megastar released his first solo album over a decade ago, after years of global success as a member of a massively popular boy band. In the same way that Radiohead’s 2007 experiment in “pay-what-you-want” record sales didn’t create a new model that worked for everybody, artists can’t necessarily look to Timberlake for cues about where their careers might be headed.

What The 20/20 Experience launch does show is that subscription services, while not ready to replace paid downloads as a revenue stream for the industry, can be a critical tool for marketing and ultimately driving sales. In time, the revenue available to streaming services may reach more sustainable levels. In the meantime, it’s nice to know the artists who embrace them aren’t shooting themselves in the foot by doing so.

Streaming may have promise, but it’s no silver bullet. The music market’s digital future is going to be a hybrid of approaches, some of which will work better than others in particular circumstances. Timberlake’s success is interesting — meaningful, even — but the way forward still isn’t a simple one.

Photo via Flickr user Edward Kustoff, CC 2.0

 

Regardless if you’re a musician or music consumer, your music life is about to change. Slowly but surely digital music distribution has been evolving from downloads to streaming, but that transition has been really picking up speed over the last 12 months. With Spotify leading the way thanks to reams of publicity, more and more consumers are finding that the joy of renting music beats owning it by a long shot.

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While it’s been long rumored that Apple has their own streaming service up their sleeve, several developments reveal the change that is about to come.

First is the fact that Jimmy Iovine’s Daisy project (named after the first computer generated song) just received a $60 million injection from the likes of Warner Music Group’s owner Len BlavatnikFort Worth billionaire Lee Bass and Australian financier James Packer. This is a serious investment by some deep pockets that know what they’re doing and don’t like to lose. Then comes word that Apple’s Tim Cook recently took a meeting with Iovine to be briefed on the project. Does that mean a collaboration? We don’t know, but at the very least, Apple has a good working relationship with Iovine, since he was one of the first to sign Universal Music onto iTunes back in 2001. Together they’d be a powerhouse, a true 1200 pound gorilla. Chances are that Apple will chose to go it alone and just stay at 800 pounds though. It doesn’t need a partner, but if there’s something there worth buying, they have lots of money.

Then comes word that Google has been quietly making deals with all the major labels for their own YouTube-based subscription streaming service to be launched later in the year.

If all this were happening a couple of years ago we would’ve looked to only one of these prospective services to be left standing at some point, with the others falling by the wayside. But this is a different time, with the streaming business far more mature thanks to the likes of Spotify, Pandora, Rdio, Slacker, et al. It’s now probably possible that all of these new services survive if they’re at least half-way decent in their user operation and offerings.

This is definitely going to be a big win for consumers, with nearly an unlimited selection of songs available for a relatively small monthly fee (not sure what the price point will end up being, but $9.95 keeps being mentioned). Consumers are quickly seeing the advantages of renting their music.

It will be a different story for artists and songwriters however. By now everyone knows how little the royalty can be from a stream, with stories abounding about income lost by the writer and artist. Although a full transition to streaming will be a godsend for the labels, with steady monthly income actually bolstering their bottom line, you can bet that not much of that will trickle down to the artists – at least at first.

It’s not going to happen overnight, but within a matter of time, you’ll see the entirety of the management and law categories of the music business devise a better way to get paid, and eventually force the labels to fall in line. And when that happens, it will trickle down to the DIYers who insist on doing it their way. To what degree this all takes place, we’ll have to wait and see.

While we’re currently in the era of Music 3.0, we’re about to see the next stage of the music business. Welcome to Music 3.5! Read more here: http://bit.ly/X6Yx7o

Google In Talks For Music Streaming Service
 Warner Music Group has struck a licensing deal with Google for two music services the technology giant is launching later this summer, according to executives familiar with the agreement. Google will offer two distinct subscription services – one through its YouTube online video property and another via its Google Play platform.

Executives at Warner, which is the first record label to commit to Google’s proposed music service, declined to comment. A YouTube spokesman issued the following statement: “While we don’t comment on rumor or speculation, there are some content creators that think they would benefit from a subscription revenue stream in addition to ads, so we’re looking at that.”

Google is also in deep negotiations with Universal Music Group, Sony Music Entertainment and other labels to nail down an agreement similar to the one it now has with Warner.

Read more here: http://bit.ly/15waxVi

Google will be jumping into a fiercely fought market for on-demand music streaming. Spotify, Rhapsody, Muve Music, Slacker, Samsung Music Hub, Sony Music Unlimited and Rdio are among the current players slugging it out for dominance. And later this summer, Beats Electronics will re-launch a revamped MOG service, branded as Beats Music.

Google, however, will be coming to the party with several formidable advantages – YouTube and Android.

Its YouTube platform attracts 800 million unique viewers a month. That’s vastly more than the tens of millions of people worldwide who are estimated to be using on-demand streaming music services — both free and paid. In addition, Google’s Android operating system powered 68.4% of all smartphones shipped globally in 2012, compared with 19.4% for Apple’s iOS, according to Strategy Analytics.

 

In Rainbows

Thom Yorke, the ethereal-voiced lead singer of the music group Radiohead, isn’t a fan of what Apple, Google, and other technology companies are doing to media. In an interview with UK-publication The Guardian, Yorke lamented what he said were attempts by tech companies to turn songs into commodities.

“They have to keep commodifying things to keep the share price up,” Yorke said. “But in doing so they have made all content, including music and newspapers, worthless in order to make their billions. And this is what we want? I still think it will be undermined in some way.”

Five years ago, Yorke and Radiohead became Internet heroes when they self released the album In Rainbows over the Web and told fans to pay what they wanted for the work. In the interview, Yorke sounded more skeptical about that kind of distribution now. http://bit.ly/YXV1j4

 

Computers Laptops iPads - H 2012

Regulatory body issues first report aimed at curbing the streaming and downloading of copyrighted content.

PARIS: Already home to some of the strictest anti-piracy laws for users, France’s Internet Authority (HADOPI) has  issued a new report examining ways to curb usage of streaming and direct download sites.

Looking to stop piracy at the source, the report suggests a combination of techniques including site blocking or domain seizures if operators do not comply.

The authority suggests the implementation of content recognition by site owners, including digital fingerprinting technology. These systems could be used to remove content upon the request of copyright holders, similar to YouTube or DailyMotion, or restrict user access based on location.

If site operators are unwilling to add these mechanisms or if illegal content reappears on the site, the report suggests initial steps such as search engine de-listings. If sites fail to comply with the warnings, HADOPI suggests it could also resort to involving the the courts in order to seize or permanently block the domains.

The agency would also seek to target the finances of any sites subject to the copyright alerts, taking steps to block PayPal accounts, the use of credit cards and third party advertising. Again looking to the courts, HADOPI suggests that if financial partners refused to cooperate, it would seek legal action.

Read more about the story here: http://bit.ly/149BUlC

The HADOPI report will be reviewed further before the agency decides on any action.

 

CBS Sony Logo Split - H 2012

Pivotal Research Group’s Brian Wieser said CBS would gain exposure in fast-growing countries.

CBS should buy Sony Pictures Entertainment, a Wall Street analyst said in a research note Tuesday.

Brian Wieser of Pivotal Research Group told clients that CBS will have cash for major acquisitions now that it has decided to turn CBS Outdoor in the Americas into an REIT while selling off the European portion of that business, as hollywoodreporter.com

“First and foremost, among potential targets we think that at the right price, SPE offers a very strong fit for CBS,” he wrote.

“If we assume SPE were worth around $10 billion in enterprise value and were capable of high-single-digit profit margins, such an acquisition would not be dilutive and would be strategically beneficial,” wrote Wieser. Read more about the article here: http://bit.ly/10vMIbW

The analyst also noted that CBS chief executive Leslie Moonves has expressed an interest in SPE.”Moonves indicated in the press that SPE is the kind of business that CBS would be interested in purchasing,” Wieser wrote. “However, Sony has reiterated several times that the division is not for sale.”

PSY’s “Gangnam Style” Video Hits One Billion Views on YouTube

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There’s clearly no stopping PSY!

The South Korean rapper, whose “Gangnam Style” video became the most-watchedYouTube video of all time last month, can now brag that it has been viewed more one-billion (yes, billion!) times. What’s more, it is also the first time a video has reached that milestone.

So, how did it accomplish such a feat?

PSY’s controversial anti-American protest song video surfaces

Well, according to Google, which owns YouTube, the video is watched seven million to 10 million times a day on average, the BBCreports.

In November, the video, which was posted to the site in July, surpassed Justin Bieber‘s “Baby” after logging just over 800 million views.

PSY is no doubt doing a little celebratory dance right about now. In his own special way, of course.

 

by Peter Gicas for eonline.com

YouTube’s Top Ten Viral Videos of 2012

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It’s harder to stumble into viral video fame these days. But YouTube has just released a list of the top ten videos that managed to find massive viral viewership this year. Five years ago, when YouTube pieced together its first list of the year’s top ten videos, many were accidental home videos or amateurish films never designed for widespread consumption, said Kevin Allocca, a trends manager for the company. With nine of the ten videos that made this year’s YouTube list coming from professional producers, making a video that appears to be an accidental hit is becoming increasingly typical. The list was released Tuesday morning. “There are more and more people who know how to build an audience, how to use YouTube,” Allocca said. “There are companies who spend millions and millions of dollars trying to do create these videos.” The only video on this year’s list not professionally produced was “Facebook Parenting,” a brash video that shows a father shooting his daughter’s laptop after she used it to make disparaging and profane remarks about him. It created a wealth of controversy, with some parents appreciating the “hard love” parenting style, while others saying he went overboard. The list, topped by the ubiquitous “Gangnam Style,” was cobbled together primarily by views. But YouTube also considered how many times the video had been shared, parodied and commented on by users. Several other trends emerged from this year’s list, Allocca said. The most-popular videos are generally growing lengthier — this year’s longest, “Kony 2012″ spanned 31 minutes. It also attracted more than 30 million page views during a single day in March, giving it the all-time 24-hour record. Also, more of the videos are drawing worldwide appeal, Allocca said, citing “Gangnam Style.” Its catchy beat crossed oceans, even if many of the listeners had no clue what the lyrics meant. Given the 2012 election, politics certainly tinged this year’s list: videos of Obama and Romney were viewed more than two billion times, according to YouTube. The most popular video? “Epic Rap Battles: Obama vs. Romney,” which featured two hilarious rappers — albeit ones that didn’t look much like the candidates. “I’m not gonna let this battle be dictated by facts,” a Romney impersonator rhymes to open the video. “I’m rich. I’ve got fat stacks and super PACs.” Here are this year’s top 10 videos, along with brief descriptions. What were your favorites? What videos should have been included?

1) PSY – Gangnam Style: Do you know what this video is really about? Do you care? Just keep dancing.

2) Walk off the Earth: This was the year’s most popular cover song, with more than 140 million views.

3) KONY 2012: Even though this video lasted more than 30 minutes, it attracted more than 30 million viewers during a single day in March, giving it the all-time 24 hour record.

4) Call Me Maybe – Bieber, Gomez, Pena: Even economic writers were using the lyrics of this song to explain the complications of the euro zone crisis.

5) Epic Rap Battles – Obama vs. Romney: Why watch the candidates discuss substantive issues when you can watch impersonators blend half-truthful caricatures into hilarious rap battles?

6) Dramatic Surprise: More people watched this video of a mysterious sign in the middle of a Flemish square than the population. Keep calm and carry on, people.

7) Why You Asking All Them Questions: Why do girls ask so many questions? Why did more than 39 million people watch this video? Where did they get that delicious fried chicken?

8) Lindsey Stirling: C’mon. You knew dubstep  – mixed with a violin — would be on the list. Right? Welcome to 2012.

9) Facebook Parenting: This dad, whose daughter disparaged him on her Facebook FB -0.23% account, wasn’t happy. So he took her laptop into a field and peppered it with a barrage of bullets. Seems logical, right?

10) Stratos Highlights: Why was Felix Baumgartner jumping from 128,000 feet into our atmosphere? No clue, but eight million people tuned in to watch live.

by By Joshua Dawsey from blogs.wsj.com

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