Archive for February 24, 2013


The Archive: Luis Bunuel, Andrei Tarkovsky, Stanley Kubrick, Akira Kurosawa & More

The Archive is a collection of cinephile-friendly findings around the web, including rare or never-before-seen photos, interviews, footage or any other bits related to classic cinema made by TheFilmStage. Check out the rundown below. Or read more here: http://bit.ly/ZrKM5l

Luis Buñuel was born on this day in 1900. See a photo of him with Catherine Deneuve on the set of Belle du Jour and a one-hour documentary on his 21-film stretch of making films in Mexico below. [The Guardian/Cinephilia & Beyond]

Wim Wenders discusses Wings of Desire in 13-minute commentary. [Digifruitella]

Andrei Tarkovsky‘s movies are streaming for free. [Open Culture]

Watch a visual essay on the three different aspect ratios (1.33:1 ; 1.66:1; 1.85:1) for On the Waterfront and watch Martin Scorsese discuss the film.

Michael Haneke‘s take on Mozart‘s Cosi Fan Tutte is debuting in Spain this weekend. [Teatro Real]

Humphrey Bogart‘s make-up test for John Huston‘s The Maltese Falcon (notice the misspelling). [tylerweaver]

Clark Gable, Shirley Temple, Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland at MGM. [emmafgreen]

Watch all of Krzysztof Kieślowski’s 10-part masterpiece Dekalog. [Xanthinusa4]

Stanley Kubrick on the Spain set of Spartacus in 1959. [FilmmakerIQ]

Watch Alex Cox‘s 50-minute documentary on Akira Kurosawa, featuring the late Donald Richie. [iambags]

Wes Anderson‘s ten favorite New York movies includes The Apartment, The Sweet Smell of Success, Rosemary’s Baby and more.  [NY Daily News]

Marlon Brando prepping on the set of Francis Ford Coppola‘s Apocalypse Now. [Reddit]

The five unusual habits of Orson Welles. [InkTank]

Watch a 45-minute documentary on the making of Stanley Kubrick‘s Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb. [Filmmaker IQ]

Yasujiro Ozu on the set of Late Spring. [Criterion Corner]

How cinematographer Roger Deakins got ten famous shots. [Vulture]

Michelangelo Antonioni and Jack Nicholson on the set of The Passenger. [FilmmakerIQ]

Watch a video detailing Saul Bass‘ title sequences for Alfred Hitchcock‘s Vertigo, North by Northwest and Psycho.

Satyajit Ray, Michelangelo Antonioni and Akira Kurosawa at the Taj Mahal. [Kino Images]

See more from The Archive here 

 

Silver Linings Playbook Feel Good Movie - H 2013

The Weinstein Company
The 28th annual Independent Spirit Awards gala, hosted by Andy Samberg, is held as a luncheon in a tent on Santa Monica beach on Saturday, Feb 23. The Hollywood Reporter‘s live blog of the event can be found here or here: http://bit.ly/VErzxB

Below is a list of the nominees, with the winners marked in bold:

Best Feature
“Beasts Of The Southern Wild”
“Bernie”
“Keep The Lights On”
“Moonrise Kingdom”
Winner: “Silver Linings Playbook”

Best Director
Wes Anderson – “Moonrise Kingdom”
Julia Loktev – “The Loneliest Planet”
Winner: David O. Russell – “Silver Linings Playbook”
Ira Sachs – “Keep The Lights On”
Benh Zeitlin – “Beasts of the Southern Wild”

Best First Feature
“Fill The Void”
“Gimme The Loot”
“Safety Not Guaranteed”
“Sound Of My Voice”
Winner: “The Perks Of Being A Wallflower”

John Cassavetes Award
“Breakfast With Curtis”
“The Color Wheel”
Winner: “Middle Of Nowhere”
“Mosquita y Mari”
“Starlet”

Best Male Lead
Jack Black – “Bernie”
Bradley Cooper – “Silver Linings Playbook”
Winner: John Hawkes – “The Sessions”
Thure Lindhart – “Keep The Lights On”
Matthew McConaughey – “Killer Joe”
Wendell Pierce – “Four”

Best Female Lead
Linda Cardenelli – “Return”
Emayatzy Corinealdi – “Middle Of Nowhere”
Winner: Jennifer Lawrence – “Silver Linings Playbook”
Quvenzhane Wallis – “Beasts Of The Southern Wild”
Mary Elizabeth Winstead – “Smashed”

Best Supporting Male
Winner: Matthew McConaughey – “Magic Mike”
David Oyelowo – “Middle Of Nowhere”
Michael Pena – “End Of Watch”
Sam Rockwell – “Seven Psychopaths
Bruce Willis – “Moonrise Kingdom”

Best Supporting Female
Rosemarie DeWitt – “Your Sister’s Sister
Ann Dowd – “Compliance”
Winner: Helen Hunt – “The Sessions”
Brit Marling – “Sound Of My Voice”
Lorraine Toussaint – “MIddle Of Nowhere”

Best Screenplay
Wes Anderson – “Moonrise Kingdom”
Zoe Kazan – “Ruby Sparks”
Martin McDonagh – “Seven Psychopaths”
Winner: David O Russell – “Silver Linings Playbook”
Ira Sachs & Mauricio Zacharias – “Keep The Lights On”

Best First Screenplay
Rama Burshtein – “Fill The Void”
Winner: Derek Connolly – “Safety Not Guaranteed”
Christopher Ford – “Robot & Frank
Rashida Jones & Will McCormack – “Celeste & Jesse Forever
Jonathan Lisecki – “Gayby”

Best International Feature
Winner: “Amour”
“Once Upon A TIme In Anatolia”
“Rust & Bone”
“Sister”
“War Witch”

Best Documentary
“The Central Park Five”
“How To Survive A Plague”
Winner: “The Invisible War”
“Marina Abramovic: The Artist Is Present”
“The Waiting Room”

Best Cinematography
Winner: Ben Richardson, “Beasts Of The Southern Wild”
“End Of Watch”
“Here”
“Moonrise Kingdom”
“Valley Of The Saints”

Piaget Producers Award
Mynette Louie – “Stones In The Sun”
Derrick Tseng – “Prince Avalanche”
Alicia Van Couvering – “Nobody Walks”

Someone To Watch Award
David Fenster – “Pincus”
Adam Leon – “Gimme The Loot”
Rebecca Thomas – “Electrick Children”

Stella Artois Truer Than Fiction Award
Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Verena Pravel – “Leviathan”
Peter Nicks – “The Waiting Room”
Jasonyyyee Tippet and Elizabeth Mimms – “Only The Young”

Robert Altman Award
“Starlet”

 

1. Barbara Streisand’s Sheer Pantsuit (1969)

2. Demi Moore’s Bike Shorts with a Bustier and Huge Coat (1989)

Demi Moore's Bike Shorts with a Bustier and Huge Coat (1989)

Image by Darlene Hammond/Hulton Archive / Getty Images

3. Bon Jovi’s Baggy Purple Velvet Tux (1991)

Bon Jovi's Baggy Purple Velvet Tux (1991)

4. Geena Davis’ Pink Tutu (1992)

Geena Davis' Pink Tutu (1992)

5. Whoopi Goldberg as Mary Poppins Meets Barney (1993)

Whoopi Goldberg as Mary Poppins Meets Barney (1993)

Via: WireImage

6. Lizzy Gardiner’s Dress Made Out of American Express Gold Cards (1995)

Lizzy Gardiner's Dress Made Out of American Express Gold Cards (1995)

7. Nicole Kidman as a Curtain with Tasseled Trim (1997)

Nicole Kidman as a Curtain with Tasseled Trim (1997)

She basically dressed as a drawing room.

Image by Kevin Mazur/WireImage

8. Juliette Binoche as Velvet Dracula (1997)

Juliette Binoche as Velvet Dracula (1997)

9. Celine Dion in This All-White Getup (1999)

Celine Dion in This All-White Getup (1999)

She basically wore white pants, a long-sleeved turtleneck, and a fedora.

Image by Stringer / Getty Images

10. Trey Parker and Matt Stone as J.Lo and Gwyneth Paltrow (2000)

Trey Parker and Matt Stone as J.Lo and Gwyneth Paltrow (2000)

Image by David McNew / Getty Images

11. Faith Hill as Technicolor Cotton Candy (2001)

Faith Hill as Technicolor Cotton Candy (2001)

Image by Vince Bucci / Getty Images

12. Juliette Binoche as a Flapper (2001)

Juliette Binoche as a Flapper (2001)

She looks fine, almost, but the Oscars are not a costume party!

Image by Chris Weeks / Getty Images

13. Björk’s Swan Dress (2001)

Björk's Swan Dress (2001)

“Stop looking at me, swan!”

Via: SGranitz

14. Diane Keaton as Charlie Chaplin (2004)

Diane Keaton as Charlie Chaplin (2004)

Image by Vince Bucci/Stringer / Getty Images

15. Sally Kirkland’s Exploding Tent Dress (2007)

Sally Kirkland's Exploding Tent Dress (2007)

made by hillary reinsberg for buzzfeed.com read more here: http://bit.ly/VEqlCw

 

 

Nine Oscar speeches that changed the world

You’re never going to win an Oscar. But whether you’re conscious of it or not, you’ve probably already given an Oscar speech.

They may be the most secretly influential forms of American rhetoric. The rhythms and tropes of wealthy filmmakers accepting career-peak trophies echo in every weepy retirement speech, every smug valedictorian address, every comic icebreaker the CEO uses to kick off his PowerPoint presentation. Movie stars show us how to kiss, how to dress. Of course we learn public discourse from them,  too. Read more here: http://wapo.st/XLTATs

Here are 9 speeches that changed the world by Amy Argetsinger from washingtonpost.com

Actress Sally Field accepts her Academy Award for best actress in the film "Places in the Heart" at the Oscar ceremonies in Los Angeles March 26, 1985. (AP)

Actress Sally Field accepts her Academy Award for best actress in the film “Places in the Heart” at the Oscar ceremonies in Los Angeles March 26, 1985. (AP)

“You know what you want to say, you want to be grounded, be yourself, be totally honest about how you’re feeling,” says Roger Ross Williams, recalling his 2010 Oscar moment. Not ringing a bell? More on him later, as we recall nine landmark Oscar speeches and their legacies.

Greer Garson: Her acceptance of the 1942 Best Actress prize (for “Mrs. Miniver”) is legendary as the longest in show history — an estimated seven minutes — but it also set the pace for gassy self-regard. The British star pontificated on the meaning of awards, her journey to the U.S., the marvelous support Hollywood was getting from the troops.Legacies: Time limits. Self-mythologizing stars (Halle Berry: “this moment is so much bigger than me”; Hilary Swank: “just a little girl from a trailer park with a dream”). RNC speeches that barely mention the nominee. The worst banquets you’ve ever attended.

Ed Begley: The veteran character actor, winning the 1962 Best Supporting Actor for “Sweet Bird of Youth,” thanked his producer, his director…“but most of all, and this is from the heart, my agent, George Morris.” The room was shocked. This was a first! “Really and truly!” the actor protested, explaining that Morris worked overtime to get him the role.Legacies: Thanking your agent, your publicist, your hairdresser. Taking your bifocals and a folded list onstage with you. (“Titanic” producer Jon Landau name-checked 55 people.) Four-page author acknowledgements. Watch the speech.

Marlon Brando: The eccentric “Godfather” star skipped the 1972 ceremony and sent “Sacheen Littlefeather” (actress-activist Marie Cruz) to refuse his Best Actor prize — in protest, she said, of “the treatment of American Indians” by Hollywood and the government. A political statement? Whatever. It was really the birth of Punk’d culture.Legacies: Five-second delays. Howard Stern fans crank-calling live news broadcasts. Sacha Baron-Cohen’s career. Kanye West interrupting Taylor Swift.

Louise Fletcher: The Best Actress winner for “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975) kept it short, gracious and barely memorable — until she completed her speech in sign language to thank her deaf parents “for teaching me to have a dream. You are seeing my dream come true.” Nothing like a good awards-show cry. Legacies: Cambodian refu­gee Haing S. Ngor’s win (“this is unbelievable, but so is my entire life”). Timothy Hutton’s shout-out to his late dad Jim Hutton. Ving Rhames regifting his Golden Globe to his hero Jack Lemmon. The very best rehearsal-dinner toasts.

Vanessa Redgrave: What was more shocking: When the Palestine advocate and Best Supporting Actress of 1977 (“Julia”) thanked the academy for standing up to “Zionist hoodlums” who opposed her? Or the hisses from the audience and subsequent scolding from presenter Paddy Chayefsky? Legacies: Susan Sarandon, Tim Robbins and Richard Gere getting in trouble for mouthing off about politics at the podium. Michael Moore calling out the president (“we are against this war, Mr. Bush!”) and getting booed. Rep. Joe Wilson’s State of the Union heckle (“you lie!”). Cable news warfare in general.

Meryl Streep: Everyone knew she would win Best Supporting Actress for 1979’s “Kramer Vs. Kramer,”  but she politely acted surprised: “Holy mackerel!” Cute, unconvincing and soon the new standard. Legacies: All of Kate Winslet’s faux-shocked acceptance speeches. Kooky, self-deprecating opening lines. (Admiral James Stockdale, vice-presidential debate of 1992: “Who am I? Why am I here?”) Later and better Streep speeches, eventually honed to a fine art.

Sally Field: What she actually said, accepting the 1984 Best Actress prize: “And I can’t deny the fact that you like me. Right now, you like me!” What it meant: A subtle reference to a line from her 1979 movie “Norma Rae.” What it turned into: The single most quoted, imitated, joked-about moment from the Oscars, ever. Legacies: Director James Cameron’s “Titanic” acceptance (“I’m king of the world!”). Meme culture. The pressure to make a funny joke on Twitter about what just happened on TV.

Jack Palance: Exulting in his 1991 Best Supporting Actor trophy (“City Slickers”), the 73-year-old dropped to the floor and did three one-armed push-ups. Legacies: Roberto Benigni climbing over the seats to accept his Best Actor prize. Adrian Brody soul-kissing Halle Berry to accept his. Obnoxious end-zone dances.

Roger Ross WilliamsRemember? He’s the 2009 Best Documentary Short director whose carefully planned speech was cut short when estranged producer Elinor Burkett rushed the stage. “Everyone was talking about it the next day,” he marvels. Legacies: A “Larry King” guest spot, a “Simpsons” parody, a “Letterman” skit, a coveted Sundance spot for “God Loves Uganda,” his new full-length documentary. Williams laughs about it now: “That attention helped my career in a big way.”

 

Watch Thom Yorke and Nigel Godrich Perform Live in London

Photo by Erez Avissar

Last night, as promisedThom Yorke and Nigel Godrich performed in London to celebrate the release of their Atoms for Peace album Amok(It’s out Monday in Europe and Tuesday in the U.S. via XL Recordings.) Now, watch a 30-minute clip of last night’s show via Consequence of Sound.

Read more here: http://bit.ly/XLN530

Stream Amok:

 

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