Archive for February 18, 2013


A scene from “Child’s Pose.”

Romanian director Calin Peter Netzer has won this year’s Golden Bear Award at the 2013 Berlinale. “Child’s Pose” focuses on the wealthy mother of a man charged with killing a young boy in an automobile accident who attempts to save her son from harsh punishment.  Upon winning the award, the film’s producer, Ada Solomon, took the stage (video uploaded to Facebook) to see the film’s win as a victory for women and storytelling and to decry the recent news that the Romanian government would curtail support for its country’s cutting edge filmmaking community. Read more here: http://bit.ly/Za7Cy4Golden Bear: “Child’s Pose” by Calin Peter Netzer (Romania)

Silver Bear – The Jury Grand Prize: “An Episode in the Life of an Iron Picker” by Danis Tanovic (Bosnia and Herzeogvina/France/Slovenia)

Silver Bear – Best Director:David Gordon Green, “Prince Avalanche” (USA)

Silver Bear – Best Actress:Paulina Garcia in “Gloria” (Chile/Spain)

Silver Bear – Best Actor: Nazif Mujic in “An Episode in the Life of an Iron Picker” (Bosnia and Herzeogvina/France/Slovenia)

Silver Bear – Best Screenplay:“Pardé (Closed Curtain),” by Jafar Panahi (Iran)

Silver Bear – Artistic Contribution: Aziz Zahmbakyjev, cinematographer of “Harmony Lessons” (Kazakhstan / Germany / France)

Alfred Bauer Prize: Denis Côté, “Vic and Flow Saw a Bear” (Canada)

Best First Feature Award: “The Rocket” by Kim Mordaunt (Australia)

Special Mention:  “Layla Fourie” by (Germany/South Africa/France/The Netherlands)

Special Mention: “Promised Land” by Gus Van Sant (U.S.)

Golden Bear for Best Short Film: “Fugue” by Jean-Bernard Marlin (France)
Silver Bear for Best Short Film: “remains quiet” by Stefan Kriekhaus (Germany)

DAAD Short Film Award: “Ashura” by Köken Ergun (Turkey/Germany)
A list of awards previously announced at the festival follows:

Crystal Bear for the Best Kplus Feature Film: “The Rocket” by Kim Mordaunt (Australia)
Special Mention: “Satellite Boy” by Catriona McKenzie (Australia)

Crystal Bear for the Best Kplus Short Film: “The Amber Amulet” by Matthew Moore (Australia)
Special Mention: “Ezi un lielpilseta” by Ēvalds Lācis (Latvia)

The Grand Prix of the Generation Kplus International Jury for Best Feature Film with € 7,500 by the Bundeszentrale für Politische Bildung (Federal Agency for Civic Education): “Mammu, es Tevi mīlu” by Jānis Nords (Latvia)
Special Mention: “Satellite Boy” by Catriona McKenzie (Australia)

The Grand Prix of the Generation Kplus International Jury for Best Short Film with € 2,500 by the Bundeszentrale für Politische Bildung (Federal Agency for Civic Education): “Cheong” by Kim Jung-in (Republic of Korea)
Special Mention: “Ezi un lielpilseta” by Ēvalds Lācis (Latvia)

Crystal Bear for the Best 14plus Feature Film: “Baby Blues” by Kasia Rosłaniec (Poland)
Special Mention: “Pluto” by Shin Su-won (Republic of Korea)

Crystal Bear for the Best 14plus Short Film: “Rabbitland” by Ana Nedeljković, Nikola Majdak (Serbia)
Special Mention: “Treffit” by Jenni Toivoniemi (Finland)

The Grand Prix of the Generation 14plus International Jury for Best Feature Film with € 7,500 by the Bundeszentrale für Politische Bildung (Federal Agency for Civic Education): “Shopping” by Mark Albiston, Louis Sutherland (New Zealand)
Special Mention: “Baby Blues” by Kasia Rosłaniec (Poland)

The Grand Prix of the Generation 14plus International Jury for Best Short Film with € 2,500 by the Bundeszentrale für Politische Bildung (Federal Agency for Civic Education): “Första gången” by Anders Hazelius (Sweden)
Special Mention: “Barefoot” by Danis Goulet (Canada)

Panorama Section Audience Award, Fiction Film: “The Broken Circle Breakdown” by Felix van Groeningen (Belgium/Netherlands)
Second Place: “Reaching for the Moon” by Bruno Barreto (Brazil)
Third Place: “Inch’Allah” by Anaïs Barbeau-Lavalette (Canada/France)

Panorama Section Audience Award, Documentary Film: “The Act of Killing” by Joshua Oppenheimer (Denmark/Norway/Great Britain)
Second Place: “Salma” by Kim Longinotto (Great Britain)
Third Place: “A World Not Ours” by Mahdi Fleifel (Lebanon/Great Britain/Denmark)

EFA Nominee Berlin (Best European Short Film): “Misterio” by Chema García Ibarra (Spain)

 

Argo, Zero Dark Thirty and Searching for Sugar Man have scooped the top screenplay honours from the Writers Guild of America.

The adapted screenplay award went to Argo writer Chris Terrio. The film, directed by Ben Affleck, is based on the 1980 CIA operation to extract six US personnel out of revolutionary Iran.

Terrio based his screenplay on The Master of Disguise, a book written by Antonio J Mendez on whom Affleck’s lead character is based, and Wired magazine article The Great Escape by Joshuah Bearman.

It beat competition from the writers of Life of Pi, Lincoln, The Perks of Being a Wallflower and Silver Linings Playbook.

It adds to Argo’s awards haul, which includes trophies for best film and director at both the BAFTAs and Golden Globes, and builds momentum for the Academy Awards, where the film has garnered seven nominations.

Zero Dark Thirty writer, Mark Boal, picked up the original screenplay prize at the awards, which were unveiled simultaneously at ceremonies on Sunday night (Feb 17) held by the WGA West in Los Angeles and WGA East in New York City.

The film, about the hunt for Osama bin Laden, beat nominees for Flight, Looper, The Master and Moonrise Kingdom.

In addition, Searching for Sugar Man saw Malik Bendjelloul win for best documentary screenplay. Read more for Michael Rosser’s review here: http://bit.ly/Za4gv3

_silver-linings-playbook-poster

Seven days left until the Oscars, and the final precursor awards roll out this weekend. Tonight sees the WGA Awards, and last night was the ACE Eddie Awards, run by the organization for film editors, and rewarding the best editing in cinema in 2012.

And we’re sure it won’t come as a huge surprise to you that “Argo” was the big winner of the night with the film’s cutter, William Goldenberg,  wrote Oliver Lyttelton for blogs.indiewire.com. Read more here: http://bit.ly/XfDzG8

While ‘Silver Linings’ is certainly an Oscar contender in many categories, it seems unlikely to be a real threat in the Editing category, so this seems to clear the way for Goldenberg to pick up the Academy Award (indeed, his closest competition is probably… himself, as co-editor with Dylan Tichenor of “Zero Dark Thirty.”).

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (DRAMATIC)
Argo
William Goldenberg, A.C.E.

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (COMEDY/MUSICAL)
Silver Linings Playbook
Jay Cassidy, A.C.E. and Crispin Struthers

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (ANIMATED)
Brave
Nicholas C. Smith, A.C.E. & Robert Grahamjones, A.C.E

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE):
Searching for Sugar Man
Malik Bendjelloul

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (TELEVISION):
American Masters – Phil Ochs: There But For Fortune
Pamela Scott Arnold

BEST EDITED HALF-HOUR SERIES FOR TELEVISION:
Nurse Jackie: “Handle Your Scandal”
Gary Levy

BEST EDITED ONE-HOUR SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Breaking Bad: “Dead Freight”
Skip MacDonald A.C.E.

BEST EDITED ONE-HOUR SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
The Newsroom: “We Just Decided To (Pilot)”
Anne McCabe, A.C.E.

BEST EDITED MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE FOR TELEVISION:
Hemingway & Gellhorn
Walter Murch, A.C.E.

BEST EDITED NON-SCRIPTED SERIES:
Frozen Planet: “Ends of the Earth”
Andy Netley & Sharon Gillooly

STUDENT COMPETITION
Michael Smith – AFI

 

 

With Quentin Tarantino‘s Django Unchained recently becoming the director’s most successful film at the worldwide box office, it’s only a matter of time before he completes his much-rumored final film in his unofficial revenge trilogy, which kicked of with Inglourious Basterds.

His Oscar-winning star Christoph Waltz stopped by Saturday Night Live to host this weekend and delivered a fun little short that changes history once again, but this time with the resurrection of Jesus, as Jordan Raup for thefilmstage.com reported. With Djesus Uncrossed, Waltz plays our “hero” and he’s joined by Ving Rhames, Brad Pitt, Samuel L. Jackson, buckets of blood and thankfully, no sign of a Tarantino cameo. Check it out the video here: http://bit.ly/XfBLgm

From Die Hard to the Whole Nine Yards, we seek out the best on-screen moments from the man who first teamed up ‘yippee-kay-aye’ with an unpublishable obscenity

Bruce Willis

Hard nut … Bruce Willis. Photograph: Jim Spellman/WireImage

An action hero who’s equally at home in comedy roles and straight dramaBruce Willis has been an A-lister for 25 years. While his presence in a film isn’t necessarily always a sign of quality.

Here are five of guardian.co.uk favourite moments from Bruce Willis’s filmography, including recommendations from @guardianfilm. Read more here: http://bit.ly/XfzsKv

1. Pulp Fiction

If you rearranged Pulp Fiction into chronological order, this would be the final scene – Butch and Fabienne riding out of town on Zed’s chopper. Who’s Zed? “Zed’s dead, baby – Zed’s dead.”

Reading on mobile? Watch the clip on YouTube

2. Hudson Hawk

Bruce carries out a fantastically choreographed robbery to the jaunty strains of Swinging On a Star. Fans of his singing might wish to check out his much-derided solo album The Return of Bruno, featuring his cover ofUnder the Boardwalk, a No 2 chart hit in the UK.

Reading on mobile? Watch the clip on YouTube

3. Moonrise Kingdom

The most recent film on our list, last year’s Moonrise Kingdom, featured Bruce in typically authoritative form as, well, a character neatly summed up in this brief scene.

Reading on mobile? Watch the clip on YouTube

4. Beavis and Butt-Head Do America

Bruce plays straight man to Mike Judge‘s sniggering simpletons in one of the stupidest, most childish and most consistently funny animated films of all time.

Reading on mobile? Watch the clip on YouTube

5. The Die Hard films

The most-nominated Bruce Willis moment was him reciting his sweary catchphrase in the Die Hard films. So here it is. It’s probably stating the obvious, but this video might not be for you if you’re offended by bad language.

Reading on mobile? Watch the clip on YouTube

• What would you add to the list?

Pieter M. van Hattem

Last night, Alabama Shakes played “Saturday Night Live” for the first time. The rootsy rockers performed their breakout hit “Hold On” and “Always Alright,” which was written for the “Silver Linings Playbook” soundtrack. And even though host Christoph Waltz messed up their name in his monologue (“Alabama Shake is here!”) the band made the most of their big late-night moment. Check out videos of the performances below.

Alabama Shakes on ‘SNL’: Watch ‘Hold On’ and ‘Always Alright’ (VIDEO) – Spinner.


 

 

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