Archive for February 16, 2013


Journey, Walking Dead and Far Cry 3 dominate in refreshed awards format, which includes Best British Game for the first time

  • Journey
Journey: up for eight awards at this year’s Bafta Video Game event

It looks like US developer Thatgamecompany is going to have to clear some more space in its already bulging trophy cabinet – the studio’s poetic adventure title Journey is nominated in eight categories at this year’s British Academy Games Awards. Amid the 17 categories, survival horror hit Walking Dead and open-world shooter, Far Cry 3 have also received a lot of attention.

For the first time, the event, which takes place in London on 5 March, will include a Best British game category. It’s a mix of indie titles and console big-hitters, with two racing stars, Need For Speed: Most Wanted and Forza Horizon, slugging it out against experimental oddity Dear Esther and compelling puzzler, The Room. 2012 was clearly a good year for UK indie talent with Mike Bithell’s Thomas Was Alone, Ed Key’s Proteus and Dene Carter’s Incoboto also making it into several categories. Scottish team 4J Studios is also in there for its fantastic conversion of Minecraft to the Xbox 360.

Elsewhere, action epics Mass Effect 3, Halo 4 and Far Cry 3 are battling it out on a range of fronts spanning Best Story, Best Actions Game and Best Game. The latter lines up Dishonored, Far Cry 3, Fifa 13, Journey, Mass Effect 3 and The Walking Dead.

Read more here: http://bit.ly/YeyOsL

Once again, the awards also feature the Ones to Watch category, which recognises student developers from the Dare to Be Digital development competition. This year’s competitors, Pixel Story, Project Thanatos and Starcrossed all show great potential.

Here’s the complete list of nominations:

Action

Borderlands 2
Development Team
Gearbox/2K Games
Call of Duty: Black Ops 2
Development Team
Treyarch/Activision
Far Cry 3
Dan Hay, Patrick Plourde, Patrik Methe
Ubisoft Montreal/Ubisoft
Halo 4
Development Team
343 Industries/Microsoft Studios
Hitman: Absolution
Development Team
Io – Interactive/Square-Enix
Mass Effect 3
Development Team
BioWare/EA

Artistic Achievement

Borderlands 2
Development Team
Gearbox/2K Games
Dear Esther
Robert Briscoe
Thechineseroom/thechineseroom
Far Cry 3
Jean Alexis Doyan, Genseki Tanaka, Vincent Jean
Ubisoft Montreal/Ubisoft
Halo 4
Development Team
343 Industries/Microsoft Studios
Journey
Development Team
That Game Company/Sony Computer Entertainment Europe
The Room
Mark Hamilton, Rob Dodd, Barry Meade
Fireproof Games/Fireproof Games

Audio Achievement

Assassin’s Creed III
Mathieu Jeanson
Ubisoft Montreal/Ubisoft
Beat Sneak Bandit
Simon Flesser, Magnus “Gordon” Gardebäck,
Simogo/Simogo
Dear Esther
Jessica Curry
Thechineseroom/thechineseroom
Far Cry 3
Dan Hay, Tony Gronick, Brian Tyler
Ubisoft Montreal/Ubisoft
Halo 4
Development Team
343 Industries/Microsoft Studios
Journey
Development Team
That Game Company/Sony Computer Entertainment Europe

Best Game

Dishonored
Development Team
Arkane Studios/Bethesda Softworks
Far Cry 3
Dan Hay, Patrick Plourde, Patrik Methè
Ubisoft Montreal/Ubisoft
FIFA 13
David Rutter, Nick Channon, Aaron McHardy
EA Canada/EA
Journey
Development Team
That Game Company/Sony Computer Entertainment Europe
Mass Effect 3
Casey Hudson
BioWare/EA
The Walking Dead
Development Team
Telltale Games/Telltale

British Game

Dear Esther
Daniel Pinchbeck, Robert Briscoe, Jessica Curry
Thechineseroom/thechineseroom
Forza Horizon
Development Team
Playground Games/Turn 10 Studios/Microsoft Studios
LEGO: The Lord of the Rings
Development Team
TT Games/Warner Brothers Interactive Entertainment
Need for Speed Most Wanted
Development Team
Criterion Games/EA
The Room
Mark Hamilton, Rob Dodd, Barry Meade
Fireproof Games/Fireproof Games
Super Hexagon
Terry Cavanagh, Niamh Houston, Jenn Frank
Terry Cavanagh/Terry Cavanagh

Debut Game

Deadlight
Raul Rubio, Luz Sancho, Oscar Cuesta
Tequila Works/Microsoft Studios
Dear Esther
DanielPinchbeck, Robert Briscoe, Jessica Curry
Thechineseroom/thechineseroom
Forza Horizon
Development Team
Playground Games/Turn 10 Studios/Microsoft Studios
Proteus
Ed Key, David Kanaga
Twisted Tree Games/Twisted Tree Games
The Room
Mark Hamilton, Rob Dodd, Barry Meade
Fireproof Games/Fireproof Games
The Unfinished Swan
Ian Dallas, Nathan Gary
Giant Sparrow/Sony Computer Entertainment Europe

Game Design

Borderlands 2
Development Team
Gearbox/2K Games
Dishonored
Development Team
Arkane Studios/Bethesda Softworks
Far Cry 3
Patrick Methè, Jamie Keen
Ubisoft Montreal/Ubisoft
Journey
Development Team
That Game Company/Sony Computer Entertainment Europe
The Walking Dead
Development Team
Telltale Games/Telltale
XCOM: Enemy Unknown
Development Team
Firaxis/2K Games

Family

Clay Jam
Chris Roem Iain Gilfeather, Michael Movel
Fat Pebble/Zynga
Just Dance 4
Alkis Argyriadis, Matthew Tomkinson, Veronique Halbrey
Ubisoft Paris/Ubisoft
LEGO Batman 2: DC Super Heroes
Jon Burton, Jonathan Smith, John Hodskinson
TT Games/Warner Brothers Interactive Entertainment
LEGO the Lord of the Rings
Development Team
TT Games/Warner Brothers Interactive Entertainment
Minecraft: XBOX 360 Edition
Development Team
Mojang/4J Studios/Microsoft Studios Xbox LIVE Arcade
Skylanders Giants
Paul Reiche, Fred Ford, Scott Krager
Toys For Bob/Activision

Game Innovation

Call of Duty: Black Ops II
Development Team
Treyarch/Activision
Fez
Development Team
Polytron Corporation/Microsoft Studios Xbox LIVE Arcade
Journey
Development Team
That Game Company/Sony Computer Entertainment Europe
Kinect Sesame Street TV
Development Team
Soho Productions/Microsoft Studios
The Unfinished Swan
Ian Dallas, Nathan Gary
Development Team
Giant Sparrow/Sony Computer Entertainment Europe
Wonderbook: Books of Spells
Development Team
London Studio/ Sony Computer Entertainment Europe

Mobile & Handheld

Incoboto
Dene Carter
Fluttermind/Fluttermind
LittleBigPlanet (Vita)
Tom O’Connor, Mattias Nygren, Lee Hutchinson
Tarsier Studios/Sony Computer Entertainment Europe
New Star Soccer
Simon Read
New Star Games/New Star Games
The Room
Mark Hamilton, Rob Dodd, Barry Meade
Fireproof Games/Fireproof Games
Super Monsters Ate My Condo
Development Team
Adult Swim Games/Adult Swim Games
The Walking Dead
Development Team
Telltale Games/Telltale

Online – Browser

Amateur Surgeon Hospital
Development Team
Mediatonic/Adult Swim Games
Dick and Dom’s HOOPLA!
Adam Clay
Team Cooper/CBBC
Merlin: The Game
Development Team
Bossa Studios/Bossa Studios
Runescape
Development Team
Jagex/Jagex
The Settlers Online
Christopher Schmitz, Guido Schmidt, Rainer Reber
Blue Byte Software/Ubisoft
SongPop
Olivier Michon, Thibaut Crenn, Daouna Jeong
FreshPlanet/FreshPlanet

Online-Multiplayer

Assassin’s Creed III
Damien Kieken, Mathieu Granjon, Yann Le Guyader
Ubisoft Montreal/Ubisoft
Borderlands 2
DevelopmentTeam
Gearbox/2K Games
Call of Duty: Black Ops II
Development Team
Treyarch/Activision
Halo 4
Development Team
343 Industries/Microsoft Studios
Journey
Development Team
That Game Company/Sony Computer Entertainment Europe
Need For Speed Most Wanted
Development Team
Criterion Games/EA

Original Music

Assassin’s Creed III
Lorne Balfe
Ubisoft Montreal/Ubisoft
Diablo III
Development Team
Blizzard Entertainment/ Blizzard Entertainment
Journey
Austin Wintory
That Game Company/Sony Computer Entertainment Europe
Thomas Was Alone
David Housden
Mike Bithell/Mike Bithell
The Unfinished Swan
Joel Corlitz, Ian Dallas, Peter Scaturro
Giant Sparrow/Sony Computer Entertainment Europe
The Walking Dead
Development Team
Telltale Games/Telltale

Performer

Adrian Hough (Haytham) – Assassin’s Creed III
Danny Wallace (The Narrator) – Thomas Was Alone
Dave Fennoy (Lee Everett) – The Walking Dead
Melissa Hutchinson (Clementine) – The Walking Dead
Nigel Carrington (The Narrator) – Dear Esther
Nolan North (Nathan Drake) – Uncharted: Golden Abyss

Sports/Fitness

FIFA 13
David Rutter, Nick Channon, Aaron McHardy
EA Canada/EA
F1 2012
Development Team
Codemasters Birmingham/Codemasters Racing
Forza Horizon
Development Team
Playground Games/Turn10 Studios/Microsoft Studios
New Star Soccer
Simon Read
New Star Games/New Star Games
Nike+ Kinect Training
Development Team
Sumo Digital Ltd/Microsoft Studios
Trials Evolution
Development Team
Antti llvessup, Kim Lahti
RedLynx/Microsoft Studios

Story

Dishonored
Development Team
Arkane Studios/Bethesda Softworks
Far Cry 3
Jeffrey Yohalem, Lucien Soulban, Jeffrey Yohalem
Ubisoft Montreal/Ubisoft
Journey
Development Team
That Game Company/Sony Computer Entertainment Europe
Mass Effect 3
Mac Walters
BioWare/EA
Thomas was Alone
Mike Bithell
Mike Bithell/Mike Bithell
The Walking Dead
Development Team
Telltale Games/Telltale

Strategy

Dark Souls: Prepare To Die
Development Team
From Software/Namco Bandai Games
Diablo III
Development Team
Blizzard Entertainment/Blizzard Entertainment
Football Manager 2013
Development Team
Sports Interactive/SEGA
Great Big War Game
David Moss, Steve Venezia, Paul Johnson
Rubicon Development/Rubican Development
Total War Shogun 2: Fall of the Samurai
Development Team
The Creative Assembly/SEGA
XCOM: Enemy Unknown
Development Team
Firaxis/2K Games

BAFTA Ones to Watch Award in association with Dare to Be Digital

Pixel Story
Martin Cosens, Thomas McParland, Ashley Hayes, Benhamin Rushton, Luke Harrison
(Loan Wolf Games)
Project Thanatos
Hugh Laird, Andrew Coles, Thomas Laird, Alexandra Shapland, Thomas Kemp
(Raptor Games)
Starcrossed
Kimi Sulopuisto, Vili Viitaniemi, Minttu Meriläinen, Petri Liuska, Andrew MacLean

via puu.sh

Pirate Bay documentary TPB AFK premieres today at the German Berlinale film festival, but you can watch it online — right now — for free. Director Simon Klose has posted his Creative Commons-licensed film in three resolutions on The Pirate Bay, as he announced in late January. TPB AFK follows The Pirate Bay’s founders through long-running battles with the Swedish and US governments, including their arrest and conviction for running the file-sharing site.

In our recent interview, Klose called the film not only a chronicle of The Pirate Bay but a call to reform copyright, saying that “the ability to share with culture is out of sync with the right to share culture.” Creative Commons is in some ways a pragmatic decision given the film’s focus on piracy, but it’s also an expression of his idealism: “I want to prove that it can be a viable business idea to give away a film for free.” TPB AFK can also be purchased as a stream or DVD pre-order on Klose’s site.

http://bit.ly/Yeyw58

The Lords of Salem Logo

“From the singular mind of horror maestro Rob Zombie comes a chilling plunge into a nightmare world where evil runs in the blood. The Lords of Salem tells the tale of Heidi (Sheri Moon Zombie), a radio station DJ living in Salem, Massachusetts, who receives a strange wooden box containing a record, a “gift from the Lords.” Heidi listens, and the bizarre sounds within the grooves immediately trigger flashbacks of the town’s violent past. Is Heidi going mad, or are the “Lords of Salem” returning for revenge on modern-day Salem?”

The Lords of Salem will be in theaters April 15, 2013.

Watch the trailer here: http://t.co/WKTnsFNV

all content courtesy of best-horror-movies.com

Do you wonder about the origins of the cinematic horror?  Are you curious about the evolution of vampire films, zombie films, or the other subgenres?  Do you just want to be entertained by actors no longer breathing?  Classic horror movies are a great place to start.

The films that follow were pivotal contributions to the genre and helped it evolve to its current state.  There is no such thing as an original spark of brilliance.  The ‘genius’ we appreciate in story and direction is always built on a foundation of earlier works.  When we say something is ‘original’ what we really mean is that it is a non-hackneyed transition point.  Every film is a product of previous works, but some directors weave earlier elements together in such a way that they appear as ‘original’ threads in and of themselves and stand alone as masterpieces – taking the genre in a direction previously ignored. The two most pivotal transition points were probablyPsycho (1960) and The Exorcist (1973).  In deciding where to draw the line between classic and contemporary horror, I chose the latter.   Psycho was an unprecedented milestone, but I found its foundation too limiting and horror classics of the 1960s introduced many essential elements of the contemporary genre.

So, which classic horror films should you take the time to enjoy?  These are John Strands’ picks for best-horror-movies.com.  I present them chronologically and highlight the gems in each, but if you want to jump ahead to how they measure up to each other – numbered and scored according to originality (most cleverly stolen ideas), story, scares, gore and creepy theme – jump to the end.

The Cabinet of Dr Caligari

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919) is pure brilliance even by today’s standards.  Released in Germany, the impetus for its disturbing nature stemmed in part from the unfavorable conclusion of the most devastating war in the history of Europe (World War I) the previous year.   A MUST SEE FOR ALL FANS OF HORROR.*

Nosferatu movie poster

Nosferatu (1922) is also a product of German silent cinema.  It is the first on screen depiction of the undead and granddaddy of all vampire movies.  Although not as original as Cabinet, it infused the genre with a richer core with its introduction of make-up effects. *

Dracula 1931 movie poster

Dracula (1931) was the first authorized silverscreen depiction of the Bram Stoker classic and film for which horror actor mainstay, Bela Lugosi, is best known.  It leaves behind the silent era and its grainy photography and brings vampires to life in a way that allows for the first jump-out-of-your-seat scares.

King Kong 1933 movie poster

King Kong (1933).  Hitler’s favorite movie!  Okay, so that is not much of a selling point.  But the favorite movie of one of the most despicable human being’s to ever exist probably appeals to a twisted sense of curiosity in some of us – something common among horror freaks.  The original monster movie is Golem (1920), which features a supernatural being conjured by oppressed Jews to wreak havoc on gentiles.

The Body Snatcher poster

The Body Snatcher (1945). From Frankenstein to a crypt dwelling mummy, Boris Karloff is famous for his portrayal of supernatural creatures in the 1930s and 1940s.  Yet, his most disturbing role is that of John Gray in this cinematic breakthrough.  Based on a Robert Louis Stevenson story by the same name, the film revolves around the unseemly business of illegally acquiring cadavers in Edinburgh, Scotland.

The Bad Seed movie poster

The Bad Seed (1956).  John Gray may have marked the turn towards human monsters, but this film demonstrated just how unnervingly sharp the angle of that turn could be.  Predating Psycho by four years, Norman Bates is, ironically, much easier to stomach than this killer.

The Horror of Dracula

The Horror of Dracula (1958)  The film is low budget and there are lingering questions that are never answered, but it is truly a horror milestone for two reasons: 1) It was a successful remake that revitalized the old monsters by capitalizing on sensational imagery and plot twists; 2) The film demonstrated the powerful effects of full color gore – complete with a couple of very bloody kill scenes.  Following The Horror of Dracula’s success, Hammer Horror successfully franchised this money-making concepts in remakes of other classic monster tales.

Psycho horror movie poster

Psycho (1960).  Although, Bad Seed explored psychopathy in a manner never before undertaken in cinema, Hitchcock demonstrated how the phenomenon could scare audiences beyond what was thought possible for a film.  Psycho shattered the ceiling of creepy themes and disturbing story lines – laying the groundwork for all cinematic killers.  Whether your preference is for superhuman slashers such as Jason, or the more diabolical Hannibal, they all are the perverted offspring of Hitchcock’s knife-wielding madman, Norman Bates.

Village of the Damned Poster
Village of the Damned (1960).  1960 was a banner year for horror.  Although, not as groundbreaking as PsychoVillage of the Damned brought sci-fi horror to a new level of originality.  An English town is possessed by an alien force that impregnates all women of child-bearing age.  Each gives birth to blonde-haired children with piercing eyes.

Black Sunday Movie Poster
Black Sunday (Mask of the Demon) 1960.  A classic not fully appreciated by the English-speaking world.  It was one of the first Italian horror films – combining gothic legend with an unprecedented amount of gore.   Witches/vampires (they are the same in this legend) rise from the dead to feed on the living in 19th century Moldova (between Russia and Romania).

Carnival of Souls

Carnival of Souls (1962) explored the boundary between the living and the dead in a way never before attempted.  This independent gem is not widely hackneyed and thus has appeal for contemporary audiences.

The Birds Poster

The Birds (1963) lifted gore effects to heights on par with advances in scares and creepy themes.  In classic horror, Hitchcock deserves at least two mentions and although his seminal work must be considered Psycho, the blood and pecked out eyes depicted in full color in The Birds.

Rosemarys Baby

Rosemary’s Baby (1968)   The film was a breakthrough in its depiction of a woman’s struggle between her traditional role and one of empowerment, as in the end, she is left to fend for herself and become her own savior.  It is probably the first modern psychological horror film and capitalizes on our fear of betrayal by those around us – reminding us that we are only able to rely on ourselves… If that.

Night of the living dead poster

Night of the Living Dead (1968). If any zombie lover has not seen the original – GET OFF YOUR ASS AND PUT IT IN YOUR QUEUE. Romero combines the effects of Black Sunday and the desperation of Carnival of the Souls to create an apocalyptic glimpse into a world where the rotting corpses of the dead walk amongst the living.  Although without the vividness of the zombie effects he would employ in Dawn of the Dead and Day of the Dead, the film was a breakthrough in possibility – creating the most grotesque images since Nosferatu. Considered sensational at the time and still formidable by contemporary standards, Night of the Living Dead is also probably the most creative independent horror film ever – single-handedly giving birth to the zombie subgenre without directly drawing from any literature.  Although, the first film appearance of zombies was in White Zombie (1932), they were possessed and controlled by a cunning Haitian sorcerer as part of a Vodou ritual.  Romero adapted that concept to all the dead without a mastermind in control – just blind instinct – and in the process created the reason many of us became interested in horror.

Read more reviews about those films above here: http://bit.ly/VWEvkB

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