Archive for January 30, 2013


Barbra Streisand To Perform On The Oscars® For The First Time In 36 Years

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BEVERLY HILLS, CA – Two-time Academy Award® winner Barbra Streisand, who has sung on the Oscars only once before, will perform on the upcoming Oscar® telecast on February 24. Streisand last sang the love theme from “A Star Is Born” on the March 28, 1977 show, winning the Best Original Song Oscar for “Evergreen” that same night.

“In an evening that celebrates the artistry of movies and music,” said producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron, “how could the telecast be complete without Barbra Streisand? We are honored that she has agreed to do a very special performance on this year’s Oscars, her first time singing on the show in 36 years.”

Streisand won her first Oscar for Best Actress in “Funny Girl” (1968), and was nominated again in 1973 for her lead performance in “The Way We Were.” She was also nominated for producing the Best Picture nominee “The Prince of Tides” (1991), which she also directed, and for co-writing the original song “I Finally Found Someone” from “The Mirror Has Two Faces” (1996).

Oscars for outstanding film achievements of 2012 will be presented on Oscar Sunday, February 24, at the Dolby Theatre™ at Hollywood & Highland Center®, and will be hosted by Seth MacFarlane live on the ABC Television Network. The Oscar presentation also will be televised live in more than 225 countries worldwide.
ABOUT CRAIG ZADAN AND NEIL MERON
Craig Zadan and Neil Meron are producers of critically acclaimed and award-winning feature films, television movies, series, and Broadway productions. Their feature films include The Bucket List, Footloose, Hairspray, and Chicago, which won six Academy Awards including one for “Best Picture.” For television, they’ve produced films of “Steel Magnolias,” “Life with Judy Garland,” and “A Raisin in the Sun,” among many others and the series “Smash” and “Drop Dead Diva.” They recently returned to their roots in live theater by producing Broadway revivals of the Tony-winning “Promises, Promises” and the Tony-winning 50th Anniversary revival of “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.”

source: oscars.org

 

If Spotify and Pandora Are the Future, Do Artists Have One?

Psy
“Wait, 1.2 billion views and you’re paying me 0.6 cents a view?” / Photo by Getty Images

Streaming services’ growth stirs debate over slim royalties

The New York Times has seen the future of music, and it doesn’t look good for musicians.

As the Times reports, the comparatively teensy amount artists earn from streaming services has caused concern throughout the industry.

While the average musician might earn 7 to 10 cents on an iTunes download, artists receive a fraction of a fraction of a cent each time their songs are played on streaming services. That’s not terrible if you’re Psy, who a Google executive recently said had earned $8 million on the 1.2 billion views for “Gangnam Style,” a rate of roughly 0.6 cents per view. It’s less good if you’re Zoe Keating, a self-described “avant cello” musician who late last year revealed that despite getting more than 1.5 million plays on Pandora in a six-month span, she received less than $1,700. Spotify was a bit kinder: Her 131,000 plays last year yielded almost $550.

Pandora, for one, lobbied last year for permission to lower its royalty rates, which unlike Spotify’s are set by law. A wide range of artists, from Brian Wilson to Rihanna, opposed the leigslation, the so-called Internet Radio Fairness Act. So did the American Association of Independent Music, which represents many prominent indie labelsBillboard reports that the legislation isn’t completely dead and is “just hibernating.”

Artists might dream of penny royalties, but streaming service providers are swimming in big bucks. Pandora is publicly traded, with a share price that values it at nearly $2 billion. Spotify isn’t public, but its investors have reportedly pegged its value at $3 billion. To put that into perspective, the entire music industry saw revenues of roughly $7 billion in 2011, according to the Recording Industry Association of America.

Streaming service companies might be worth a lot on paper, but they’re not contributing much to the record business just yet. Pandora had $202 million in “content acquisition costs” in its last four reported quarters, and Spotify recently said it had made $500 million in royalty payments, the Times notes. That pales in comparison to music downloads’ $2.6 billion in 2011 sales.

Read more here: http://www.spin.com/articles/streaming-services-artist-royalties-spotify-pandora-youtube-debate?utm_source=spintwitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=spintwitter

Album Review: Pillowfight – Pillowfight

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Throughout the 43 minutes of Pillowfight’s self-titled debut LPvocalist/lyricist/violinist Emily Wells constructs verses that challenge Taylor Swift for the accolade of most innocent pop songstress. Backed by Dan the Automator’s collection of subtle ivory runs, muffled trumpet trills, and abbreviated string arrangements, Wells recounts the frustrations of a tumultuous relationship on “Sleeping Dogs”: “I can’t seem to give up, please don’t say goodbye / I’ll call you up and say, ‘I’ve been thinkin’ bout you baby and I’m back to stay’ / You were never just a memory, I knew we’d meet again / Thank you for forgiveness, thanks for giving in.” Fortunately for Swift, the darker side of Well’s past relationships, most vividly recalled on album opener “Used to Think”, eliminate her from such a prize.

Read more here: http://bit.ly/14rJF8G

Fourteen years Wells’s senior, Dan the Automator has stepped up as a mentor for her ongoing unification of classical music with hip-hop. Dan may have multiple hits credited to his production, but no ego avails on Pillowfight, as he chooses instead to tone down his own propensity for sample-oddities to focus on tones of Wells’ voice and visceral lyrical expressions. This is certainly a project that deserves further attention from each artist.

 

The Canadian twin sisters prepare to release their 7th studio album. Listen to it now.

Courtesy Warner Bros.

Courtesy Warner Bros.

Tegan & Sara were once heralded for their folky indie-rock sound. But as of late, the twin sisters have become an even bigger mainstream success, riding their self-made wave of 80′s inspired pop-rock-infused love songs. With their latest album Heartthrob taking on even happier synth sounds, unbridled love and sexual overtones, could they be the Vince Clarke and Andy Bell (Erasure) of 2013?

Building a base of real rock fans hit high gear when The Black Keys asked them to open a series of concert dates last October. “This is the thing, people that like licks, also like dance hits,” joked Tegan in an interview. But according to Sara, rock’s not the only genre they’d like to conquer. Although the duo recently collaborated with dance maven David Guetta, Sara said she’d even enjoy working with the masters of metal, Mastadon, proving the girls are truly up for anything.

Read more here http://x1075lasvegas.cbslocal.com/2013/01/28/tegan-sara-stream-new-pop-rock-album-heartthrob/

Discussing the weathered look of the album art, Sara confesses, “I love the idea that we make these albums and that they feel so in the moment and modern and vibrant and relevant and then like in two years, you feel it sort of slip away.”

Heartthrob hits stores tomorrow, January 29th. Listen to the album in its entirety here.

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