Archive for January 11, 2013


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David Bowie has released a single!

In a stroke of media brilliance David Bowie has returned on his 66th birthday with a great brooding single in which he sings about his life and with which he managed to swerve the whole of the news media.

In these times where everybody knows everything about everything else (or thinks they do) and Twitter has the news before it’s news Bowie has done a Stone Roses by suddenly reappearing into the middle of the music debate with a single that is better than anything else he has done for years.

Working in New York with Tony Visconti, who was repsonsable for his great work in his seventies, the single sings about his time in Berlin and other key moments in his life in a track that is reminscent of his ‘Low’ period. the song is brooding and dark and has a certain world weariness to it as it builds to its climax.

Bowie’s new 17 track album, The Next Step, is due in March.

The glam-rock legend has released the recording as a download. It will be followed by a new album, ‘The Next Day’ in March.

Bowie has not performed live since 2006 and has rarely been seen in public since then.
The new track was recorded in New York and produced by the singer’s long-time collaborator Tony Visconti.

The single’s appearance online was “a genuine surprise”, said John Wilson, presenter of BBC Radio 4’s Front Row.

“He’s a proper artist. He doesn’t release records because it’s time for another record. He releases records when there’s something for him to say.”

Where Are We Now? is a simple, unfussy ballad – Bowie singing mournfully over a piano motif that slowly builds to an understated crescendo.

The song includes several references to the city of Berlin, where Bowie and Visconti produced a critically-acclaimed trilogy of albums – Low, Heroes and Lodgers – in the 1970s.

 

written by john robb for louderthanwar.com image from telegraph.co.uk

Singer expected to unveil new single on Monday, his first solo material since 2006

Justin Timberlake in 2012

Photograph: Matt Sayles/AP

On Monday morning, Justin Timberlake is coming back. A surprise countdown on the singer’s website promises that something – expected to be a new single – will be released at the beginning of next week.

According to Billboard and the Hollywood Reporter, Timberlake has recorded around 20 songs for his third solo album. “Someone asked me the other day, ‘So are you just done with music?'” the 31-year-old said in a new video, posted to his website on Thursday. “[But] I don’t wanna put anything out that I don’t love … You have to wait for it.”

“Look I’ve only done two albums in 10 years,” Timberlake explained. “I’m the one that sits and is obsessive about it before you even get to hear it.” Yet now, for the first time since 2006’s FutureSex/LoveSounds, “I’m ready,” Timberlake said. The clip finishes with the singer standing by a microphone, wearing a pair of headphones.

Reading on mobile? Click here to listen

With Timberlake’s clock ticking down, his protege Justin Bieber weighed in: “u got a good reason to be ready,” Bieber tweeted. “i have heard some stuff … #greatmusic.”

Bieber also confirmed that Timberlake is collaborating with producer Timbaland. The engineer Carl Paul had previously tweeted that Timberlake was working with Timbaland, Beyoncé and Jay-Z. “Justin, Jay Z, Timberland (sic). New record Monday,” promised the New York DJCharlamagne Tha God.

In the six years since his last LP, Timberlake’s focus has been on acting. He was nominated for a Screen Actors Guild award for his role in The Social Network, and also starred in Friends with Benefits and In Time. Still, the former *N Sync star’s biggest triumphs are musical: both of his albums topped the charts in the UK, garnering three Brit awards and selling more than 20m copies worldwide.

 

written by sean michaels for guardian.co.uk

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This morning the Academy Award nominationswere revealed, and as usual, they’re bound to inspire debates over who got snubbed.

In light of today’s news (and, ahem, no Best Actor nomination for Jamie Foxx’s work in Django Unchained), we’re looking back at the biggest Oscar snubs of all time. To be clear, we’re not squabbling about nominees who should’ve won their categories—we’re talking about iconic and classic performances or films that were inexplicably overlooked and failed to even receive nominations.

15. Gary OldmanSid and Nancy (1986)
Overlooked for: Best Actor
Nominated Instead: Paul Newman (The Color of Money), Dexter Gordon (Round Midnight), William Hurt (Children of a Lesser God), Bob Hoskins (Mona Lisa), James Woods (Salvador)
It’s always tough to play a real person, but to play a punk icon/raging drug addict/probable murderer less than a decade after his high-profile death is a nearly impossible task. Oldman transformed into Sid Vicious for this film, both physically (at one point being hospitalized for losing too much weight for the role) and emotionally, pouring himself into the role.

14. Kathleen TurnerBody Heat (1981)
Overlooked for: Best Actress
Nominated Instead: Katherine Hepburn (On Golden Pond), Diane Keaton (Reds), Marsha Mason (Only When I Laugh), Susan Sarandon (Atlantic City), Meryl Streep (The French Lieutenant’s Woman)
As femme fatale Matty Walker in this neo-noir, Kathleen Turner made her film debut, but her performance makes it seem as though she’s been doing this forever—oozing the style, confidence and sensuality of a bygone era.

13. Steven SpielbergJaws (1975)
Overlooked for: Best Director
Nominated Instead: Milos Forman (One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest), Robert Altman (Nashville), Federico Fellini (Amarcord), Stanley Kubrick (Barry Lyndon), Sidney Lumet (Dog Day Afternoon)
Sure, the directors’ category was pretty stacked in 1975, and it’s tough to decide who we’d bump to make room for him, but with Jaws, Steven Spielberg essentially created the summer blockbuster and forever changed how we see movies while laying the groundwork for the auteur’s impressive career—no small feat.

12. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
Overlooked for: Best Picture
Nominated InsteadOliver!Funny GirlThe Lion in WinterRachel, RachelRomeo and Juliet
As we wrote when we declared this one of the slowest (but also greatest) movies of all time, “Straddling the boundary between art film and sci-fi epic, Stanley Kubrick’s space-age fantasia is loaded with arresting images. The legendary opening, with the apes and the bone—would you really want that passage hurried? The scene builds like a symphony, and then hurtles us into space, where the action moves with appropriate gravity. The menace of HAL is partly in the deliberateness with which he operates. If you’re looking for exploding Death Stars and quippy little alien creatures, you’ve come to the wrong place. Kubrick takes interstellar life seriously.” If you’re still not convinced, think about how visually stunning the film remains to this day and consider what it’d be like to watch it in 1968—before we’d even put a man on the moon.

11. Dennis HopperBlue Velvet (1986)
Overlooked for: Best Supporting Actor
Nominated Instead: Michael Caine (Hannah and Her Sisters), Tom Berenger (Platoon), Willem Dafoe (Platoon), Denholm Elliot (A Room With A View), Dennis Hopper (Hoosiers)
The Academy chose the wrong 1986 Dennis Hopper performance. He’s great in Hoosiers, but as Frank Booth in David Lynch’s Blue Velvet, he’s positively terrifying. Booth is one of the most memorable movie villains of all time—sometimes funny, frequently disturbing and always riveting. Plus, he was drinking PBRbefore it was cool.

10. The Dark Knight (2008)
Overlooked for: Best Picture
Nominated InsteadSlumdog MillionaireThe Curious Case of Benjamin ButtonFrost/NixonMilkThe Reader
The Dark Knight was more than just a movie; it was an event. Christopher Nolan’s sequel to Batman Begins managed to transcend genre and become much more than a simple comic-book movie. It’s a visually stunning morality tale that raises some important questions about good and evil, and Heath Ledger’s performance as The Joker—hideous, deranged and yet hugely charismatic—is one for the ages.

9. Bette Davis, Of Human Bondage (1934)
Overlooked for: Best Actress
Nominated Instead: Claudette Colbert (It Happened One Night), Grace Moore (One Night of Love), Norma Shearer (The Barretts of Wimpole Street)
There was such a massive public outcry when Bette Davis was snubbed for her star-making performance in Of Human Bondage that the Academy essentially owned up to their mistake and actually allowed a special write-in campaign to get her on the ballot.

8. Alfred Hitchcock, North By Northwest (1959) (but also basically every other film he made)
Overlooked for: Best Director
Nominated Instead: William Wyler (Ben-Hur), Jack Clayton (Room at the Top), Billy Wilder (Some Like It Hot), George Stevens (The Diary of Anne Frank), Fred Zinnerman (The Nun’s Story)
The fact that one of the greatest—if not the greatest—directors of all time never received a Best Director Oscar seems unreal and borderline criminal. Despite making almost 60 films, the lion’s share of which his directorial work is more than worthy of a nomination, Hitch was only nominated for the award five times and never won.

7. The Shining (1980)
Overlooked for: Best Picture
Nominated InsteadOrdinary PeopleCoal Miner’s DaughterThe Elephant ManRaging BullTess
Though it’s considered a classic today, The Shining failed to receive the recognition it deserved when it initially came out; in fact, it actually received two Razzie nominations—a Worst Actress nod for Shelley Duvall and a Worst Director nomination for Stanley Kubrick. Thankfully, audiences have since come to their senses and realized what a gem this Stephen King adaptation truly is.

6. Anthony Perkins, Psycho (1960)
Overlooked for: Best Actor
Nominated Instead: Burt Lancaster (Elmer Gantry), Spencer Tracy (Inherit The Wind), Trevor Howard (Sons and Lovers), Jack Lemmon (The Apartment), Laurence Olivier (The Entertainer)
Like the director himself, Alfred Hitchcock’s actors were historically overlooked by the Academy. As the villainous Norman Bates, Perkins played against type and delivered an iconic, creepy, yet wildly sympathetic performance. Norman’s a murderer with his dead mom stuffed in the attic, but he’s also a seemingly sweet, awkward guy who just got pushed to the brink by an unbearable relative. Hey, we all go a little mad sometimes, right?

5. Gene Kelly, Singin’ in the Rain (1952)
Overlooked for: Best Actor
Nominated Instead: Gary Cooper (High Noon), Marlon Brando (Viva Zapata!), Kirk Douglas (The Bad and the Beautiful), Jose Ferrer (Moulin Rouge), Alec Guinness (The Lavender Hill Mob)
The epitome of Old Hollywood glamour—and a triple threat if ever there was one—Gene Kelly received a special Oscar in 1952 (the same year he stunned in An American in Paris) for “his versatility as an actor, singer, director and dancer, and specifically for his brilliant achievements in the art of choreography on film.” That same year, he turned in arguably his most iconic performance in Singin’ In The Rain, but despite his exuding grace and pure joy in the titular number, the Academy rained on his parade at the following ceremony and failed to recognize him.

4. Sidney Poitier, In the Heat of the Night (1967)
Overlooked for: Best Actor
Nominated Instead: Rod Steiger (In the Heat of the Night), Warren Beatty (Bonnie and Clyde), Dustin Hoffman (The Graduate), Paul Newman (Cool Hand Luke), Spencer Tracy (Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner)
In 1967, Sidney Poitier starred in not one, but two extremely important films about race. At a time when Civil Rights tensions were boiling over, Poitier brought a glimpse of the African-American experience to the mainstream. His white co-stars (Rod Steiger for In the Heat of the Night and Spencer Tracy for Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner) were both nominated for their portrayals of men who must confront their own prejudices, but Poitier himself wasn’t rewarded for his work. His performance as homicide detective Virgil Tibbs in In the Heat of the Night is especially profound, as he brings a quiet, restrained anger to the performance.

3. Do The Right Thing (1989)
Overlooked for: Best Picture
Nominated InsteadDriving Miss DaisyBorn on the Fourth of JulyDead Poets SocietyField of Dreams,My Left Foot
As Scott Wold wrote when we declared it the third-best movie of the ’80s, “the violence of Do the Right Thing erupts as an extension of literal and metaphorical long-simmering neighborhood temperatures, and finally boils over as something of a catharsis while never coming off as mawkish, or giving audiences the ability to escape conversation after the credits roll. A remarkable cast sells the complicated relationship with their Brooklyn neighborhood flawlessly.” The titular “right thing” in the film is hazy and thought-provoking, but instead, Driving Miss Daisy—a story about race with a much more upbeat, Hollywood ending in which the two protagonists put aside their differences and share a piece of pie—took home the top prize.

2. Hoop Dreams (1994)
Overlooked for: Best Documentary Feature
Nominated InsteadMaya Lin: A Strong Clear VisionComplaints of a Dutiful DaughterD-Day RememberedFreedom on My MindA Great Day in Harlem
Hoop Dreams is one of the best films of the ‘90s—documentary or otherwise—and despite appearing on more critics’ Top 10 lists than any other movie in a stacked year that included Pulp FictionForrest Gumpand The Shawshank Redemption, it failed to make even the shortlist for the Oscars. There was (justifiable) outrage, and many campaigned for the film to be nominated for Best Picture, but sadly, director Steve James and his team got shafted. History repeated itself last year when James’ The Interrupters was overlooked as well.

1. Vertigo (1958)
Overlooked for: Best Picture, Best Actor (James Stewart), Best Director (Alfred Hitchcock)
Nominated Instead: Best Picture: GigiCat on a Hot Tin RoofAuntie MameSeparate TablesThe Defiant Ones
Vertigo is Alfred Hitchcock’s masterpiece, and it features frequent collaborator Jimmy Stewart’s finest performance. As we wrote when we declared it to be the best Hitchcock film, “His typically warm everyman on-screen persona is gone, and here he’s neurotic, cold and obsessed—and brilliant. It’s also regarded as Hitchcock’s most personal film; the idea of a man remaking a woman in the image of another he’s lost is often said to reflect the director’s decision to keep casting Grace Kelly-esque blondes after feeling abandoned by Kelly, who retired from acting in 1956.” So, what did Vertigo get at the Oscars? Squat, save for a few minor technical nominations. For shame, Academy voters, for shame.

 

— image taken from fineartamerica.com articles written by bonnie stiernberg for paste magazine

 

James McAvoy searches for a lost painting

The first trailer has gone online for Trance, Danny Boyle’s new film in which James McAvoy plays a fine art auctioneer with a light-fingered tendency to pocket some of the more expensive pieces that come his way.

All is going lucratively until McAvoy takes a bump on the head and forgets where he’s stashed the spoils of his latest heist. And it isn’t just a case of lost profit, since Vincent Cassel’s ringleader isn’t best pleased with McAvoy’s bungling.
Enter Rosario Dawson’s hypnotherapist, who is charged with extracting the info from McAvoy’s brain in order to recover the missing painting…
Take a look, below:
Above everything else, our predominant feeling about this one is that it seems like a whole heap of fun, with the plot rattling along at breakneck speed and McAvoy and co. clearly having a ball.
Co-starring Tuppence Middleton and Danny Sapani, Trance opens in the UK on 27 March 2013.

 

— article by george wales for totalfilm.com image from total film.com

Alice in Chains have released the music video for their previously released new song “Hollow.” The track will be featured on the band’s highly anticipated, as-yet-untitled new album, which is due this spring. Check out the clip below, and let us know what you think in the comments.

 

Quvenzhane Wallis
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences made history Thursday nominating both the oldest — Emmanuelle Riva, 85, in “Amour” — and the youngest –Quvenzhane Wallis, 9, in “Beasts of the Southern Wild” — actresses in the best actress category.
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The two will compete against Naomi Watts for her role in“The Impossible,” Jessica Chastain for “Zero Dark Thirty”and Jennifer Lawrence for “Silver Linings Playbook.” Wallis, who shot the part when she was only 6, had never acted before starring in Benh Zeitlin’s tale of life in the Bayou, while Riva has been at her craft since 1958. Both are nominated for the first time.
Yet they are up against three actresses, all with previous nominations to their name. Chastain was an unknown two years ago, yet today marks the 35-year old actress’s second nomination in two years for her lead role as CIA analyst Maya in Kathryn Bigelow‘s drama“Zero Dark Thirty.” (She was nominated last year for a supporting role in “The Help.”) Lawrence, 22, is also an over-achiever, landing her second nomination Thursday morning for her role as a neurotic young widow in David O. Russell‘s romantic dramedy. Her first nomination was for 2010’s “Winter’s Bone.” She was named best actress by the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn. and is nominated for both a Golden Globe and SAG Award. Lawrence is vowing to have a better time this year then in 2011, when the pressure of the night and the events leading up to the show led her call it quits on Oscar night by 10:30. “I was already in bed by then,” she said.
It should help that her castmates Bradley Cooper, Jackie Weaver and Robert DeNiro will all be on hand as fellow nominees to help her celebrate. “I have a feeling that no one will allow me to do that this time around,” said Lawrence, who admitted feeling overwhelmed by both the fashion stress and the red carpet interviews. “There is so much pressure that last time I didn’t enjoy it so much. This time I’m going to not let there be too much pressure and just have fun.” Naomi Watts, 44, was nominated for her part in Juan Antonio Bayona’s harrowing disaster tale “The Impossible.” The actress, 44, previously was nominated for the 2003 drama “21 Grams.” She’s also nominated this year for a Golden Globe and SAG Award.
The news is sweet for Watts, who watched the nominations on TV even though she vowed she wouldn’t for fear of being disappointed. While she wishes more of the cast and filmmakers from “The Impossible” were recognized for their work, she was thrilled to receive well wishes from them Thursday morning–and to specifically receive an email from Maria Belon, the real-life woman on whom her role was based. “She wrote something, like she always does, that made me cry,” said Watts. “It’s the message I was waiting for.” Watts is going to try to approach the remainder of the season with the same attitude she believes Belon would. “I feel so connected to this movie and to Maria and her story,” she added. “She would enjoy it. She’s someone that has such a joy of life. I’m always trying to take a page out of her book.” Last year, Viola Davis (“The Help”) and Meryl Streep (“The Iron Lady”) went head to head throughout the Oscar season with Streep taking home the ultimate prize, for the first time in 29 years. The 85th Academy Awards will take place Feb. 24 at Hollywood’s Dolby Theatre.
— article written by nicole sperling for latimes.com riva’s image from telegraph.co.uk

 

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Olympics queen Emeli Sandé has four nominations, with Alt-J and Mumford and Sons each picking up three. See the full list of nominees for the 2013 Brit Awards.

Emeli Sandé leads the nominations for the 2013 Brit Awards with four, including one in the coveted British Album category.

The Scottish singer, who won the Critics’ Choice award at last year’s Brits, is also nominated twice in the British Single category, for Next to Me and Beneath Your Beautiful (with Labrinth), and could be crowned best British Female.

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British folk band Mumford and Sons are nominated in three categories, as are Mercury Prize winners Alt-J. The two acts will go head-to-head in the British Group and British Album categories. The other nominees for British Album are Paloma Faith and Plan B.

The Rolling Stones, who celebrated their 50th anniversary as a band last year, are nominated for Best British Live Act – an award which returns after last being handed out in 2009 – and have been confirmed as one of the performers at the ceremony, as well as Muse, Sandé and One Direction.

The veteran British rock band, who sold out two dates at London’s O2 Arena in November 2012 in less than ten minutes, were also nominated at the inaugural Brit Awards ceremony in 1977, losing out to the Beatles in the Best British Group category.

However, they will not receive the Outstanding Contribution to British Music award – won last year by Blur – as this prize has been omitted from the 2013 ceremony. Previous winners of the award have included Sir Paul McCartney, Paul Weller and Status Quo.

Adele is up for two awards, despite not having released an album since January 2011. Her theme to the James Bond film Skyfall is nominated for British Single, while she will take on boy band One Direction and Mumford and Sons for the new Global Success award which will recognise a British act’s worldwide success.

Amy Winehouse is posthumously nominated in the British Female category. The British singer-songwriter died at her home in Camden last year aged 27, with a second inquest recently confirming that accidental alcohol poisoning was the cause of death.

Elsewhere, Bruce Springsteen is up against Frank Ocean in the International Male category, while Rihanna, Lana Del Rey and Taylor Swift are among the nominees for International Female.

It had already been announced that this year’s Critics’ Choice Award will go to Chichester-born singer-songwriter Tom Odell.

The Brit Awards 2013 take place on Wednesday, February 20, and will be hosted by James Corden.

The Complete List Nominees:

British Breakthrough Act

Alt J
Ben Howard
Jake Bugg
Jessie Ware
Rita Ora

British Female

Amy Winehouse
Bat for Lashes
Emeli Sandé
Jessie Ware
Paloma Faith

British Group

Mumford and Sons
Muse
One Direction
The xx

British Live Act

Rolling Stones
Coldplay
Mumfords
Muse
Vaccines

British Male

Ben Howard
Calvin Harris
Ollie Murs
Richard Hawley
Plan B

Global Success

Mumford and Sons
Adele
One Direction

British Producer

Damon Albarn
Jake Gosling
Paul Epworth

British Single

Adele, Skyfall
Alex Clare, Too Close
Coldplay + Rihanna, Princess of China
Rita Ora/DJ Fresh, Hot Right Now
Emile Sandé, Next To Me
Florence+ the Machine, Spectrum
James Arthur, Impossible
Jessie J, Domino
Labrinth ft. Emeli Sandé, Beneath Your Beautiful
Ollie Murs, Troublemaker
Rita Ora, RIP
Rizzle Kicks, Mama Do The Hump
Robbie Williams, Candy
Rudimental, Feel the Love
Stooshe, Black Heart

Special Prize

War Child

Critics’ Choice

Tom Odell

International Female

Rihanna
Alicia Keys
Cat Power
Lana del Ray
Taylor Swift

International Group

Alabama Shakes
Black Keys
Fun
Killers
Script

International Male

Bruce Springsteen
Frank Ocean
Gotye
Jack White
Michael Buble

British Album

Alt J
Emeli Sandé
Mumford and Sons
Paloma Faith
Plan B

— source: telegraph.co.uk image from spin.com and nme.com

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